Key threatening process nominations not prioritised for assessment

Key threatening process nominations no longer eligible for automatic consideration

The following nominations have been considered for prioritisation by Committee for two consecutive years and are no longer eligible for automatic consideration for prioritisation. If additional information becomes available a new nomination could be submitted for consideration for prioritisation.

KTP name Years considered Reasons the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) recommended that the nomination was not prioritised
1080 poison baiting used for the control of vertebrate ‘pest’ species 2007 & 2008 The use of 1080 poison is subject to a controlled, licensing scheme and there is a limited amount of evidence available regarding the impact of the process on non-target species. However, there is some evidence to suggest the process is impacting on the Dingo, and an investigation of the conservation status of the Dingo may be pursued, depending on resources.

Nomination - 1080 poison baiting used for the control of vertebrate ‘pest’ species (PDF - 453.02 KB) | (DOC - 212.5 KB)

Death or injury to marine species as a direct result of boat strike on the east coast of Australia 2007 & 2008 The Committee recognises that boatstrike is a known cause of death for individuals of Dugong and some turtle species in certain areas. However, there is insufficient evidence available to assess the impact of the process on these species at a population level and a lack of data regarding the impact of the process across its national extent.

Nomination - Death or injury to marine species as a direct result of boat strike on the east coast of Australia (PDF - 1.15 MB) | (DOC - 1005.5 KB)

Ecosystem degradation, habitat loss and species decline due to invasion in southern Australia by introduced Tall Wheat Grass (Lophopyrum ponticum) 2010 & 2011 This nomination falls fully within the assessment of the broader KTP ‘Novel biota and its impact on biodiversity’.

Nomination - Ecosystem degradation, habitat loss and species decline due to invasion in southern Australia by introduced Tall Wheat Grass (Lophopyrum ponticum) (PDF - 464.4 KB) | (DOC - 637 KB)

Ecosystem degradation, habitat loss and species decline due to urban, semi-urban, industrial & other similar development (e.g. infrastructure development) and subsequent human occupation affecting nationally critically endangered, endangered or vulnerable species or ecological communities or those likely to become so 2009 & 2010
Resubmitted and considered 2011 & 2012
It is a very broad KTP nomination, to the extent that it encompasses the effects of a number of other listed and/or nominated KTPs. Full assessment would take a considerable amount of resources and would duplicate work completed or underway. The proposed KTP is insufficiently defined, extending across multiple ecosystems and multiple sub-threats (land clearance, invasive species, greenhouse gases, predation by feral foxes and cats etc.). The definition would require significant refining to distinguish it from other KTPs. In addition, an assessment of the KTP’s eligibility for listing would require extensive examination of the impact on listed threatened species and communities and implications for planning and other regulations in multiple jurisdictions. The Australian Government has commenced development of a Sustainable Population Strategy for Australia, taking into account the economic, social and environmental impacts of such a strategy. This KTP would require extensive consultation across a range of portfolios and sectors and would likely duplicate work undertaken in other areas. The listing of this process as a KTP is unlikely to be an effective mechanism by which to achieve any tangible reduction in ecological impacts from urban development.

Nomination - Ecosystem degradation, habitat loss and species decline due to urban, semi-urban, industrial & other similar development (e.g. infrastructure development) and subsequent human occupation (PDF - 638.03 KB) | (DOC - 478 KB)

Ecosystem degradation, habitat loss and species decline in arid and semi-arid Australia due to the invasion of buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris and C. pennisetiformis) 2012 & 2013 Buffel grass is having a negative impact on biodiversity in Australia’s rangelands. It threatens biodiversity by out-competing native vegetation and increasing fuel loads to produce hotter and more intense wildfires. Buffel grass is described as a ‘transformer weed’ in the Australian rangelands. It is widely considered to be the most debilitating ’fatal injury weed of natural ecosystems in arid and semi-arid Australia and directly or indirectly displaces and threatens a large percentage of native and endemic plants and animals.
The Committee notes that this threat is recognised in the overarching KTP ‘Novel biota and their impact on biodiversity’. Novel biota refers to organisms that are new to an ecosystem, and the scope of this broader KTP covers all invasive species including weeds. However, the Committee recommends that specific threat abatement guidelines be developed to address this threat.

Nomination - Ecosystem degradation, habitat loss and species decline in arid and semi-arid Australia due to the invasion of buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris and C. pennisetiformis) (PDF - 1.22 MB) | (DOC - 319.5 KB)

Fatal injury to marine mammals, reptiles, and other large marine species through boat strike on the Australian coast 2012 & 2013 Adverse impacts of this process on individuals of marine wildlife have been recorded, but the data in the nomination relate mostly to marine turtles in one geographic area (the coast of urban parts of Queensland). While the nomination presented important information, the case for the threat being significant at the species level is not quantified.

Nomination - Fatal injury to marine mammals, reptiles, and other large marine species through boat strike on the Australian coast (PDF - 1 MB) | (DOC - 429 KB)

Herbivory and Habitat Degradation by Feral Deer 2011 & 2012 This nomination falls fully within the assessment of the broader KTP ’Novel biota and its impact on biodiversity’.

Nomination - Herbivory and Habitat Degradation by Feral Deer (PDF - 874.38 KB) | (DOC - 487.5 KB)

Human population growth in Australia 2010 & 2011 Human population growth is a major driver of impacts on the environment, as recognised in a range of government documents. However, it is a process that is influenced by a broad range of economic and social drivers, only some of which are under governmental control. Of those that may be influenced by government policy, many of these are in sectors beyond the control of the EPBC Act. Where the EPBC Act may be effective, a human population growth KTP would overlap significantly with existing KTPs, such as Land Clearance and Greenhouse Gases. Additionally, since this nomination was received, the Australian Government has commenced development of a Sustainable Population Strategy for Australia, taking into account the economic, social and environmental impacts of such a strategy. A human population growth KTP would require extensive consultation across a range of portfolios and sectors and would likely duplicate work undertaken in other areas. The listing of this process as a KTP is unlikely to be an effective mechanism by which to achieve any tangible reduction in ecological impacts from human population growth.

Nomination - Human population growth in Australia (PDF - 575.32 KB) | (DOC - 563.5 KB)

Loss of habitat and native flora due to expansion of the weed Lippia (Phyla canescens)’ 2008 & 2009 The impacts of this process will be addressed through the assessment of ‘‘The introduction of novel biota and its impact on biodiversity” key threatening process nomination. Therefore there is no additional conservation benefit from considering this nomination separately.

Nomination - Loss of habitat and native flora due to expansion of the weed Lippia (Phyla canescens) (PDF - 332.52 KB) | (DOC - 233.5 KB)

Recreational game fishing - competition game fishing especially for sharks, tuna and marlins 2012 & 2013 The physiological impacts and survival rates of catch-and-release of game fish are important issues that require further research and consideration. While the nomination presented important information, the case for the threat being significant at the species level is not quantified.

Nomination - Recreational game fishing - competition game fishing especially for sharks, tuna and marlins (PDF - 1.49 MB) | (DOC - 684.5 KB)

The invasion, establishment and spread of Lantana camara impacts negatively on native biodiversity including many EPBC listed species and communities. 2008 & 2009 The impacts of this process will be addressed through the assessment of "The introduction of novel biota and its impact on biodiversity" key threatening process nomination. Therefore there is no additional conservation benefit from considering this nomination separately.

Nomination - The invasion, establishment and spread of Lantana camara impacts negatively on native biodiversity including many EPBC listed species and communities (PDF - 311.33 KB) | (DOC - 244.5 KB)

Key threatening process - possible future consideration

The following nominations have not been prioritised but are eligible for consideration in the next assessment cycle.

KTP name Years considered Reasons the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) recommended that the nomination was not prioritised
Marine seismic activities 2013 The current understanding of the science, as presented in the nomination, demonstrates relatively small impacts (mostly behavioural) over short time scales. The case for this process leading to any species becoming threatened, or a threatened species being elevated to a higher category, is not made quantitatively. The principal effects that are currently known are to marine mammals and marine turtles and these are widely recognised and addressed in current policy as applied to environmental assessment of applications to conduct seismic activities. The Committee considers this is an important area for future research.