Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Acacia georgensis
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice for Acacia georgensis (Bega Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2014cd) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, the approved conservation advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and mitigate against key threats (29/04/2014).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia georgensis.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Recovery Plan for Threatened Flora of Rocky Outcrops in South Eastern New South Wales (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2003) [State Recovery Plan].
NSW:Bega Wattle - profile (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2005f) [Internet].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Vulnerable (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013 list) as Acacia georgensis
Scientific name Acacia georgensis [9848]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Tindale
Infraspecies author  
Reference Tindale, M.D. (1980) Notes on Australian taxa of Acacia No. 6. Telopea 1(6): 446; plate XXV [tax. nov.]
Other names Racosperma georgense [30632]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images

Acacia georgensis is an erect or spreading shrub or tree, usually betwen 4 m and 12 m high (Tindale 1980; Briggs & Leigh 1990; Harden 1991; Tame 1992; Orchard & Wilson 2001a).

This species is endemic to the south coast and adjacent tablelands of NSW (Harden 1991; Orchard & Wilson 2001a; NSW NPWS 2003b). In 2002, it was known from seventeen sites spanning a range of c. 70 km from Wadbilliga NP south to the Towamba River (NSW NPWS 2003b).

Details of the populations from Briggs & Leigh (1990) and NSW NPWS (2003b) are:
- the type locality on Dr George Mt 5.5 km east-north-east of Bega supports c. 2000 plants. within an area of c. 2.5 ha. Plants show a wide variation in age from young to old with many seedlings present.
- at Kianinny Bay, Bournda NP, near Tathra, consisting of 10 000 plants over c. 3 ha and three much smaller populations 3 km to the south near Kangarutha Point and also within the National Park. Most of the population at Kianinny Bay consists of one or several cohorts which germinated following a past fire. There are no seedlings present in this stand.
- at Towamba River in the Coolangubra section of the South East Forests NP, an outlying population of 45 individuals.
- in Wadbilliga NP, nine populations containing c. 15 000 individuals extending from Belowra in the north to Warrigal Fire Trail in the south.
- at Desert Creek in the Bemboka section of the South East Forests NP, two populations numbering c. 400 individuals.

This species is locally abundant on dry northerly and westerly slopes of rocky granite, rhyolite and sandstone hillsides and headlands (Tindale 1980; Briggs & Leigh 1990; Harden 1991; Tame 1992; Orchard & Wilson 2001a; NSW NPWS 2003b). It grows in shallow loams (Briggs & Leigh 1990) amidst small rocks, boulders or rock sheets (NSW NPWS 2003b). The species is found between sea level and 300 m asl (Briggs & Leigh 1990).

Where it occurs, it is the dominant species, usually comprising more than 85% of the canopy and forming a low open to closed forest. Common or prominent associated woody species include Leucopogon juniperinus, Platysace lanceolata, Beyeria lasiocarpa and Leptospermum brevipes (NSW NPWS 2003b).

Specific habitat details for the two sites reported by Briggs & Leigh (1990) are:
Dr George Mt: The species occurs on the summit and slopes. The summit area has shallow soils and many exposed granite slabs, supporting a shrub community dominated by the species and also containing Kunzea ambigua, Eriostemon myoporoides, Phebalium carruthersii, Boronia anemonifolia and Eucalyptus sp. aff. stricta. The shrubland grades into eucalypt woodland downslope. (Briggs & Leigh 1990; RNEDB June 2001).

Kianinny Bay: The species occurs on the rocky slopes and ridge immediately west of the bay and on associated north-facing slopes extending inland. The site is characterised by skeletal soils on outcropping rhyolite, which supports a shrub community dominated by the species and also containing Melaleuca armillaris, Commersonia fraseri, Lasiopetalum macrophyllum and Beyeria lasiocarpa. In places the shrub community grades into Eucalyptus tereticornis woodland with a dense shrub understorey (Briggs & Leigh 1990; RNEDB June 2001). Further associated species include: Zieria sp. nov. (aff cytisiodes), Lomandra longifolia, Monotoca elliptica, Platysace lanceolata, Plectranthus parviflorus, Olearia tomentosa and Dendrobium speciosum (Briggs & Leigh 1990).

The species bears pale yellow or golden yellow spikes (Tindale 1980; Briggs & Leigh 1990; Harden 1991; Tame 1992; Orchard & Wilson 2001a) from Aug. to Oct; flowering has also been recorded in Feb. (Briggs & Leigh 1990). Pods develop in Dec. (Tindale 1980). Pollination is assumed to be by insects but birds may also be involved. Seeds may be dispersed by birds and ants which are attracted to the lipid-rich aril (NSW NPWS 2003b).

Adults are killed by fire and regeneration is from seed (Briggs & Leigh 1990). Whilst severe fires stimulate mass recruitment, fire is not essential for seed germination. This is a long-lived, highly drought-tolerant species that is incapable of suckering. A dead stem from Dr George Mountain of 15 cm diameter had about 35 growth rings indicating that it was at least this age. An exceptional plant at Towamba River has reached a diameter of 70 cm and is assumed to be several hundred years old (NSW NPWS 2003b).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Acacia georgensis in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006h) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Chrysanthemoides monilifera (Bitou Bush, Boneseed) Acacia georgensis in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006h) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Acacia georgensis in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006h) [Internet].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Acacia georgensis in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006h) [Internet].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Utility and Service Lines:Powerline easement maintenance and construction; mortality due to collision with powerlines Acacia georgensis in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006h) [Internet].

Briggs, J.D. & J.H. Leigh (1990). Delineation of Important Habitats of Threatened Plant Species in South-Eastern New South Wales. Canberra: Australian Heritage Commission.

Harden, G.J. (ed.) (1991). Flora of New South Wales, Volume Two. Kensington, NSW: University of NSW Press.

Meredith, L.D. & M.M. Richardson (1990). Rare or Threatened Australian Plant Species in Cultivation in Australia. Report Series No. 15. Page(s) 1-114. Canberra: Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service.

NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service (2003b). Recovery Plan for Threatened Flora of Rocky Outcrops in South Eastern New South Wales. [Online]. NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service. Hurstville, NSW January 2003. Available from: http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/PDFs/recoveryplan_draft_flora_rocky_outcrops.pdf.

Orchard, A.E. & A.J.G. Wilson, eds. (2001a). Flora of Australia, Volume 11B, Mimosaceae, Acacia Part 2. In: Flora of Australia. Canberra, ACT: ABRS & CSIRO.

Register of the National Estate Database (RNEDB) (2001). Register of the National Estate Database.

Tame, T. (1992). Acacias of Southeast Australia. Kenthurst, Kangaroo Press.

Tindale, M.D. (1980). Notes on Australian taxa of Acacia No. 6. Telopea. 1(6):429-449.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia georgensis in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sat, 26 Jul 2014 13:33:05 +1000.