Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat abatement plan for competition and land degradation by rabbits (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008adh) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
VIC:Flora and Fauna Guarantee Action Statement 73-Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Venn, D.R., 2003) [State Action Plan].
State Listing Status
SA: Listed as Endangered (National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (South Australia): June 2011 list)
VIC: Listed as Threatened (Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Victoria): May 2014 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
VIC: Listed as Vulnerable (Advisory List of Rare or Threatened Plants in Victoria: 2005)
Scientific name Acacia glandulicarpa [8838]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Reader
Infraspecies author  
Reference The Victorian Naturalist 13 (4 Mar. 1897) 146.
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Acacia glandulicarpa

Common name: Hairy-pod Wattle

Conventionally accepted as Acacia glandulicarpa (CHAH 2010).

The Hairy-pod Wattle is a dense, spreading shrub growing between 0.5–2 m high, with many branches. The olive-green foliage may be dull or bright. The grey-brown branches are terete (cylindrical and often tapering), covered in short hairs, with small raised leaf-bases along the stems. Phyllodes (modified stems that function as leaves) of the Hairy-pod Wattle are unevenly oblong-obovate (egg-shaped with narrow end attached to the stalk) to more or less elliptic (egg-shaped) and 5–13 mm long and 3–8 mm broad. Often thick, smooth and stiff, they are sometimes covered with a sticky coating when young, and the lower margins are usually wavy, with the apex shortly pointed. Phyllodes are 2-veined, the central vein being more prominent than the obscure laterals (Entwisle et al. 1996; Jessop & Toelken 1986).

Inflorescences (flowerheads) are simple, axillary (growing at the join between stem and leafstalk), solitary or paired, with 8–20 bright yellow flowerheads. Peduncles (flower stalks) are about as long as the phyllode. The narrow, oblong seed pods are 30 mm long and 2–5 mm wide, straight or curved, sticky, and covered with glandular shining hairs (Entwisle et al. 1996; Jessop & Toelken 1986).

The Hairy-pod Wattle is known from south-east SA and western Victoria with a number of populations in the Wimmera area of western Victoria; the Northern Mount Lofty Ranges in SA, in the Booborowie, Burra Gorge, Hanson and Farrell Flat areas; and Wertaloona Station, SA (Carter 2011). In western Victoria, the species is scattered in 100 woodland sites, with most localities in the south-west Wimmera, from south-west of Horsham to north of Nhill, with a disjunct occurrence in the Big Desert, approximately 31 km south-west from Rainbow (Carter 2011; Stuwe 1982; Venn 2003). The species was probably once widespread on moderately fertile soils, but is now largely confined to poorer soils (Venn 2003).

The Hairy-pod Wattle was originally surveyed by Stuwe in 1981–82, with further surveys by the Horsham Branch of the Field Naturalists Club of Victoria in the Wimmera district in 2003 identifying previously undocumented roadside sites (Venn 2003).

Approximately 6000–12 000 Hairy Pod Wattle plants are known from approximately 75 locations, the majority of these occurring in the Wimmera region of western Victoria. Only seven of these locations occur in SA. Most populations comprise less than 20 plants, though 50% of the total number of plants occur in just seven populations. One population in the Little Desert National Park in Victoria accounts for about 25% of the total population of the species (Carter 2011). Most populations comprise ageing plants, though after heavy spring rain in 2003 some recruitment was observed at several sites (Venn 2003; Whibley & Symon 1992).

Sixty of the known Victorian populations occur on roadsides, railway reserves or small Crown Land remnants scattered within developed agricultural land or on the fringes of developed agricultural land. These remnants generally occur on slopes in the transition zone between heavy clay soils and sandy soils. Many of the occurrences along roadsides are close together (within 100 m of each other) and therefore the number of breeding populations may be as low as 50 (Carter 2011; Venn 2003). It is considered that further locations may be found along roadsides and possibly on adjoining private land that still support remnant native vegetation in the Victorian Wimmera and adjacent areas in SA (Jessop & Toelken 1986 cited in Carter 2011).

The population trend for the Hairy-pod Wattle may be considered to be in decline. Small, fragmented stands are vulnerable to disturbance, with little opportunity to expand. The species has disappeared from at least two known sites as a result of physical disturbance, and similar threats still exist at many sites. Whilst age classes at sites have been classed as ranging from senescing (old and dying) plants to young vigorous ones, the overall population trend is predominantly ageing (Carter 2011).

Nine Hairy-pod Wattle sites have been described as important based on regeneration, population size, land tenure, patch and landscape condition, and geographic location (Carter 2011). These are outlined in the following table:

Site Population size (year) Threats Comments
Victoria
Little Desert National Park: Kiata Lowan Sanctuary 2900–3900 (2003) Grazing, weed invasion, visitor damage and track maintenance Largest known population in two separate groups. A small proportion (<10%) of the population extends into adjoining private land that has a conservation covenant.
Little Desert National Park: McHabes Hut Track East 500–1000 (2003) Weed invasion and inappropriate fire regimes  
Little Desert National Park: McHabes Hut Track West 300–900 (2003) Weed invasion, inappropriate fire regimes and recreational vehicle damage About one third of the population extends onto adjoining private land that has a conservation covenant.
Gerang Gerung Flora Reserve and adjoining public land 1100–2400 (2003) Weed invasion One of the largest known populations, it includes 50-100 plants in a stand of planted, non-indigenous Eucalyptus species.
Junction Dam Flora Reserve 700–2000 (2003) Weed invasion  
Sheepwash Flora Reserve 200–500 (2003) Weed invasion, grazing and trampling by stock, and lack of recruitment  
South Australia
Hopkins Creek Conservation Park < 50 (2003) Grazing by stock and feral herbivores, weed invasion, erosion and road work/maintenance Population relatively small and localized.
Wertaloona Pastoral Lease, Frome Downs 330 'clumps' (1993) Grazing by stock and feral herbivores, weed invasion and erosion  
Farrell Flat/Hanson, roadside Unknown Road work/maintenance, weed invasion and agricultural spray drift Range of age classes present.

The Hairy-Pod Wattle occurs in Little Desert National Park, Gerang Gerung Flora Reserve, John Smith Memorial Reserve, Wyperfeld National Park, Junction Dam Flora Reserve, Sheepwash Flora Reserve, Hopkins Creek Conservation Park (Carter 2011; Stuwe 1982). Gerang Gerung, Winiam East (between the Little Desert National Park and Gerang Gerung) and the John Smith Memorial Reserve were specifically reserved for "the preservation of native plants" including the Hairy-pod Wattle (Venn 2003).

The Hairy-pod Wattle occurs in semi-arid environments with a mean annual rainfall of 400–500 mm. Many sites coincide with gentle slopes at the transition zone between heavy clay/gravel soils on the flats and sandy soils on the rises (Venn 2003). The species is generally uncommon, where Buloke is the dominant overstorey tree, and is sparse to absent where Broombush dominates the understorey (Carter 2011). It occurs in the following habitat types:

Area Structure Soil Overstorey Understorey Source
Victoria Mallee Gravelly or sandy, well-drained soils

Yellow Mallee (Eucalyptus incrassata), Water Mallee (E. dumosa), Wimmera Mallee-box (E. wimmerensis) or Bull Mallee (E. behriana)

Golden Pennants (Glischrocaryon behrii), Blue Flax-lily (Dianella revoluta), Gold-dust Wattle (Acacia acinacea), Flame Heath (Astroloma conostephioides), Feather Speargrass (Austrostipa elegantissima), Annual Spear-grass (Austrostipa macalpinei), Austrodanthonia spp., Silver Broombush (Babingtonia behrii), Blackthorn (Bursaria spinosa subsp. spinosa), Coarse Dodder-laurel (Cassytha melantha), Common Eutaxia (Eutaxia microphylla), Small-leaf Goodenia (Goodenia benthamiana), Pink Velvet Bush (Lasiopetalum behrii), Broombush (Melaleuca uncinata) and Clammy Daisy-bush (Olearia decurrens) Carter (2011), Venn (2003)
Grassy and shrubby woodland Heavier soil (Wimmera loam) Yellow Gum (Eucalyptus leucoxylon), Grey Box (E. microcarpa), Buloke (Allocasuarina luehmannii) or Black Box (E. largiflorens Gold-dust Wattle, Blue Flax-lily, Feather Speargrass, Common Eutaxia, Reed-leaf Wattle (Acacia euthycarpa), Small-leaved Clematis (Clematis microphylla), Foxtail Mulga Grass (Neurachne alopecuroidea), Common Bog-rush (Schoenus apogon), Wedge-leaf Hop-bush (Dodonaea viscosa subsp. cuneata), Goodenia spp., Chrysocephalum spp., Austrostipa spp., Austrodanthonia spp., Lemon beauty heads (Calocephalus citreus), Pink Mulla Mulla (Ptilotus exaltatus), Fuzzweed (Vittadinia cuneata) and Small Vanilla-lily (Arthropodium minus) Carter (2011)
Burra Creek Gorge, South Australia Open scrub vegetation Skeletal, hard, alkaline red duplex soils on rocky hillside Red Mallee (Eucalyptus socialis), Chindoo mallee (E. brachycalyx) and Southern Cypress Pine (Callitris gracilis)   Davies (1986); Whibley and Symon (1992)
Shrubland Light sandy clay loams Narrow-leaved Hopbush (Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima), Clammy Daisy-bush and Felted Wallaby Bush (Beyeria lechnaultii)   Carter (2011)
Hanson, South Australia Shrubby woodland   Dominant Needle Wattle (Acacia carneorum) and Sand Sida (Sida ammophila), and subdominant Needlewood (Hakea leucoptera subsp. leucoptera) and Dead Finish (Acacia tetragonophylla)   Carter (2011); Whibley and Symon (1992)
Tall shrubland Skeletal soils with outcropping shale Golden Wattle (Acacia pycnantha) and Kangaroo Thorn (A. paradoxa) Bitter Cryptandra (Cryptandra amara) and Kangaroo Grass (Themeda triandra) Carter (2011); Whibley and Symon (1992)

The Hairy-pod Wattle has bright yellow flowers that appear from July to October (Venn 2003). Populations in South Australia have been noted as being partly clonal (sprouting from root-suckers) (Whibley & Symon 1992), but this habit has not been reported for Victorian populations. Regeneration occurs following ground disturbance, such as grading or ploughing of firebreaks (Venn 2003), but seedlings will also grow in the absence of fire or soil disturbance (Morcom pers. comm. cited in Venn 2003). Successful propagation from seed has been recorded (Venn 2003).

The Hairy-pod Wattle can look similar to Hedge Wattle (Acacia paradoxa). The species has been mistaken for Hedge Wattle and sprayed with herbicide during weed control programs (Venn 2003).

Loss of Habitat

Clearing of habitat for agriculture is likely to have caused significant decline in the distribution and abundance of the Hairy-pod Wattle. Many known populations are in remnant vegetation, often roadsides, in heavily cleared areas. The previous abundance within mallee vegetation communities is not known (Carter 2011; Venn 2003).

Weed invasion

Problematic weed species include Bridal Ceeper (Asparagus asparagoides), Cape Weed (Arctotheca calendula), Patterson's Curse (Echium plantagineum) and pasture grasses, such as Avena spp., Bromus spp., Perennial Veldtgrass (Ehrharta calycina) and Lolium spp. Degraded sites and small linear remnants (roadside reserves) often have suppressed recruitment due to weeds. At Gerang Gerung, dense post-fire exotic grass growth may have restricted establishment of new Hairy-pod Wattle individuals (Carter 2011; Venn 2003).

Disturbance

Road, powerline and firebreak construction and maintenance all threaten roadside remnants containing the species. Several stands have been damaged or destroyed by previous road works. Whilst some seedling regeneration has been observed following disturbance, the species disappeared from at least two sites (a railway line and a cemetery) prior to 1996 as a result of physical disturbance activities. The site at Kiata Lowan Picnic Ground is a popular recreation location and trampling of vegetation and habitat may occur (Carter 2011; Venn 2003).

Grazing

Livestock may compact soil, increase weed spread and limit regeneration of the Hairy-pod Wattle. Many sites do not experience heavy grazing, and grazing is formally excluded from important populations on flora reserves. However, some farmers may run their stock through reserves or on roadsides during dry seasons. The thick and rigid phyllodes make the Hairy-pod Wattle less likely to be eaten, but in poor seasons they are grazed and the removal of shoots and buds by stock and feral herbivores may inhibit regeneration. Control activities for the Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), such as warren ripping, may also damage individuals and stands (Carter 2011; Venn 2003).  

Herbicide use

As many roadside populations occur adjacent to farmland, these may be damaged by aerial drift from agricultural herbicides. The species is also threatened by misidentification or accidental spraying during roadside weed control programs (Carter 2011; Venn 2003).

Changed fire regimes

The optimal fire regimes for the Hairy-pod Wattle are not known, though frequent burning, for example at intervals less than the maturation time of the species, may prevent seed set, especially at sites where weeds dominate. A low intensity autumn fire at Gerang Gerung Flora Reserve killed adult plants and no post-fire regeneration was observed, though Rabbit browsing may have influenced this. Some large, apparently healthy sites such as Kiata Picnic Ground, have not been burned for more than 100 years (Braithwaite pers. comm. cited in Carter 2011), indicating that long-term absence of fire may not be detrimental (Carter 2011; Venn 2003).

Pathogens

Extensive galling, thought to be produced by a rust fungus similar to that known to infect Jumping-jack Wattle (Acacia enterocarpa), was observed on plants in the largest population at Kiata in the late 1990s, with the loss of some individual plants. Galling might be initiated by plants suffering environmental stress, especially during extended drought periods, or may be just part of natural cycle. However, it could be highly detrimental to many roadside populations where only a few plants are recorded (Carter 2011; Venn 2003).

The National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle (Carter 2011) outlines a number of objectives to help recover the species that include:

  • determine distribution, abundance and population structure
  • determine habitat requirements
  • manage threats to populations
  • identify key biological functions
  • determine growth rates and viability of populations
  • establish a population in cultivation
  • build community support for conservation.

The Action Statement for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Venn 2003) also outlines management actions for the protection and recovery of the species that include:

  • survey and monitor known and potential sites
  • manage reserves where the species is known
  • revegetate private and public land
  • protect the species on private lands.

Management documents relevant to the Hairy-pod Wattle are at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006i) [Internet].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat alteration (vegetation, soil, hydrology) due to trampling and grazing by livestock National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat modification, destruction and alteration due to changes in land use patterns National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006i) [Internet].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Mechanical disturbance during construction, maintanance or recreational activities Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006i) [Internet].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:inappropriate conservation measures National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Recreational Activities:Soil disturbance and/or trampling due to bushwalking National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006i) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Ehrharta calycina (Perennial Veldtgrass) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Avena barbata (Bearded Oats) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Echium plantagineum (Paterson's Curse, Salvation Jane, Purple Bugloss, Blue Echium, Blueweed, Blue Weed, Lady Campbell Weed, Plantain-leaf Viper's Bugloss, Purple Echium, Riverina Bluebell) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Arctotheca calendula (Capeweed, Cape Dandelion) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Avena fatua (Wild Oats) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Asparagus asparagoides (Bridal Creeper, Bridal Veil Creeper, Smilax, Florist's Smilax, Smilax Asparagus) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Pollution:Airborne Agricultural pollutants:Herbicide drift Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006i) [Internet].
Protected status:Protected status:Lack of secure conservation land tenure Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006i) [Internet].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006i) [Internet].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development of roads and railroads National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Utility and Service Lines:Habitat modification due to maintenance of water pipeline easement National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Utility and Service Lines:Powerline easement maintenance and construction; mortality due to collision with powerlines National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa (Carter, O., 2011) [Recovery Plan].

Carter, O. (2011). National Recovery Plan for the Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa. [Online]. Melbourne, Victoria: Department of Sustainability and Environment. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/acacia-glandulicarpa.html.

Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) (2010). Australian Plant Census. [Online]. Australian National Herbarium, Australian National Botanic Gardens and Australian Biological Resources Study . Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/chah/apc/.

Davies, R.J.P. (1986). Threatened Plant Species of the Mt Lofty Ranges and Kangaroo Island Regions of South Australia. Conservation Council of South Australia.

Entwisle, T.J., B.R. Maslin, R.S. Cowan & A.B. Court (1996). Mimosaceae. In: Walsh, N.G. & T.J. Entwisle, eds. Flora of Victoria. 3:585-658. Inkata Press, Melbourne.

Jessop, J.P. & H.R. Toelken, eds. (1986). Flora of South Australia. Adelaide, South Australia: SA Government Printing Division.

Stuwe, J. (1982). Rare and endangered Victorian plants. III. Acacia glandulicarpa. Victorian Naturalist. 99:62-65.

Venn, D.R. (2003). Flora and Fauna Guarantee Action Statement 73-Hairy-pod Wattle Acacia glandulicarpa. [Online]. Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment. Available from: http://www.dse.vic.gov.au/plants-and-animals/flora-and-fauna-guarantee-act-action-statements-index-of-approved-action-statements.

Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment (Vic. DSE) (2005a). Advisory List of Rare or Threatened Plants in Victoria - 2005. [Online]. East Melbourne, Victoria: Department of Sustainability and Environment. Available from: http://www.dse.vic.gov.au/dse/nrenpa.nsf/93a98744f6ec41bd4a256c8e00013aa9/cfd982b7b4c0bc93ca256fa2007affbc/$FILE/Advisory%20List%20of%20Rare%20or%20Threatened%20Plants%20in%20Victoria%20-%202005.pdf.

Whibley, D.J.E. & D.E. Symon (1992). Acacias of South Australia. Adelaide, South Australia: Flora and Fauna of South Australia Handbook Committee.

EPBC Act email updates can be received via the Communities for Communities newsletter and the EPBC Act newsletter.

This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia glandulicarpa in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sun, 21 Sep 2014 21:25:36 +1000.