Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered as Hibbertia puberula subsp. glabrescens
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice for Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (a shrub) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2013dv) [Conservation Advice].
 
Commonwealth Listing Advice for Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (a shrub) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2013dy) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, the Threatened Species Scientific Committee recommended that there should not be a recovery plan for this species as recovery actions would be better achieved through the provision of conservation advice (19/12/2008).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (74) (19/12/2008) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008b) [Legislative Instrument] as Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06).
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (156) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2013y) [Legislative Instrument] as Hibbertia puberula subsp. glabrescens.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:River-Flat Eucalypt Forest on Coastal Floodplains - profile (NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change (NSW DECC), 2005o) [Internet].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Critically Endangered (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013) as Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06)
Scientific name Hibbertia puberula subsp. glabrescens [86645]
Family Dilleniaceae:Dilleniales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author  
Infraspecies author Toelken
Reference Toelken, H.R. & Miller, R.T., (2012) Notes on Hibbertia (Dilleniaceae) 8. Seven new species, a new combination and four new subspecies from subgen. Hemistemma... Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens 25: 84, Fig. 2CC-EE [tax. nov.]
Other names Hibbertia sp. nov. (Bankstown Airport) [81854]
Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) [81969]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) was first noted in 2006 during the first botanical inspection of Bankstown Airport in which it was determined to be H. puberula. However, the former's prostrate habit, as well as microscopic examination of tomentum character, revealed it to vary from this species on a number of diagnostic features (Toelken 2000). Tomentum characteristics are a major diagnostic feature in Hibbertiaand a major review of the genus is currently underway.

Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) is a prostrate shrub. It has few to numerous spreading, glabrous, wiry branches which are up to 40 cm in length. Its leaves are oblong-lanceolate to almost linear, 3–6 mm long by 0.8–1.4 mm wide. The flowers are yellow with notched petals (TSSC 2009).

Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) is only known from Bankstown Airport within the Bankstown Local Government Area (LGA) south-west of Sydney, NSW. Since 1986, comprehensive vegetation surveys have occurred throughout remnant vegetation in the Bankstown Local Government Area and no further sites of this species have been located (TSSC 2009).

H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) occurs over an area covering two hectares. This restricted extent of occurrence makes this species vulnerable to stochastic events (TSSC 2009).

Historical aerial photography depicts continual modification of habitat and removal of native vegetation from Sydney Basin, the Bankstown LGA, Georges River floodplain and land in and around Bankstown Airport. This modification of habitat has affected individual species and is likely to have affected the occurrence of H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06), especially as the location of this species is bound by urban development (TSSC 2009). Although the extent of decline is unknown it is inferred that this species has reduced in extent due to land clearing and associated urbanisation.

Comprehensive vegetation surveys of all known remnant vegetation in the Bankstown LGA have been undertaken since 1986 without finding further populations. Other unsuccessful targeted surveys have occurred at Voyager Point, Liverpool LGA (Gibson 2008, pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2009).

The full population extent of Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) is unknown. Extant above ground population is estimated at less than 50 individuals. The potential for recruitment from the soil stored seed bank is unknown (TSSC 2009).

As H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) was first observed in October 2006 there are limited historical population data available. It is suspected that this species has undergone a reduction in numbers as historical aerial photography shows a continual modification and degradation of suitable habitat of this species.

Since 2006, approximatly 18 plants have been lost which corresponds to one subpopulation and some plants from another subpopulation (TSSC 2009). The cause of this reduction is unknown and original population character was only recorded in limited detail (TSSC 2009).

It can be inferred that the extent of occurrence; area of occupancy; area, extent and quality of habitat; and the number of mature individuals of H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) will continue to decline given the very low number of mature individuals and the potential threat from stochastic events. There is interest to further develop areas in proximity to this species, however the details of these plans are not finalised and the impacts are unclear (Bankstown Airport 2005; TSSC 2009).

No population exist within reserved land. A portion of Bankstown Airport is designated as an "Environment Protection Zone" (Bankstown Airport 2005), however, it is unclear whether Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) occurs within this zone.

The area of the airport in which Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) occurs is highly modified Georges River Tertiary Alluvium Floodplain Communities. The NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service has completed broadscale vegetation mapping of the area where this population is found and mapped the area as modified Sydney Coastal Riverflat Forest - Alluvial Woodland. Due to habitat clearence these lands are maintained as modified grassland (TSSC 2009).

The geology of the site where H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) occurs is sandy tertiary alluvium with high silt content. Associated indicative species present on site include canopy species (which are rare) such as Rough-barked Apple (Angophora floribunda), Coast Banksia (Banksia integrifolia), Forest Red Gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis), Parramatta Red Gum (E. parramattensis) and Melaleuca decora. Understorey species include Sweet Wattle (Acacia suaveolens), Aristida warburgii, Pale Grass-Lily (Caesia parviflora), Dianella longifolia, Goodenia hederacea, Fan Flower (G. paniculata), Mat Guinea-flower (Hibbertia diffusa), White Kunzea (Kunzea ambigua), Laxmannia gracilis, Leptospermum polygalifolia, Slender Onion-orchid (Microtis parviflora), Kangaroo Grass (Themeda australis) and Slender Sun-orchid (Thelymitra pauciflora) (e.g. NSW DECC 2005o).

The Sydney Coastal Riverflat Forest ecological community is listed, under the name River-Flat Eucalypt Forest on Coastal Floodplains, as Endangered under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (NSW).

Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) flowers from October to December and seed set usually occurs from October to January. As this species is a prostrate shrub, vegetative reproduction is possible, however the species has not been observed to reproduce vegetatively (TSSC 2009).

When not in flower Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) is cryptic as it is a relatively small prostrate shrub. Surveys would be best undertaken during the flowering period when the large yellow flowers are prominent (TSSC 2009). Specific habitat intensive searches should be undertaken as well as random meander searches across adjoining habitat types. Mid mornings on mild to warm sunny to bright overcast days are best for maximum flowering. Dry hot days should be avoided as few flowers may open (TSSC 2009).

The major threats to Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) are potential airport development, significant habitat change and weed invasion. The current distribution of this species is likely to be a contraction of past extent as a result of land clearing. Although many proposals have been put forward to develop land in the vicinity of this species, none have eventuated. Proposed airport developments include sporting fields, roads (including a link road through the airport) and other infrastructure. Development threatens the survival of this species directly (clearing of habitat, trampling, compaction, altered hydrology, increased weed invasion etc.) and indirectly by nutrification of ground and surface waters from fertilisers (TSSC 2009). The population's close proximity to residential land may amplify development pressures (TSSC 2009).

H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) is found in a section of Bankstown Airport that is dominated by pasture species and introduced weeds. One survey identified 18 introduced weed species including African Love Grass (Eragrostis curvula) and Kikuyu Grass (Pennisetum clandestinum) (TSSC 2009).

Stochastic events (such as disease and extreme weather) also threaten this species due to its restricted habit and low population number (TSSC 2009).

Minister's reasons for recovery plan decision

The Threatened Species Scientific Committee recommended that there should not be a recovery plan for this species as recovery actions would be better achieved through the provision of Conservation Advice.

Bankstown Airport environment management

The Airport Environment Strategy (Bankstown Airport 2005) aims to promote and implement sound environment management policies and practices; conserve bushland adjacent to Deverall Park as a habitat, protecting its flora and fauna (it is unknown if Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) occurs at this site); and contribute to the protection of native flora and fauna and their habitat on and around the airport.

Priority actions

The Conservation Advice for Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (TSSC 2009f) outlines a number of priority actions that include:

  • More precisely assess population size, distribution, the effect of the current mowing/ slashing regime on the species, ecological requirements of the species and the relative impacts of threatening processes.
  • Undertake survey work in suitable habitat and potential habitat to locate any additional populations.
  • Undertake seed germination or vegetative propagation trials to determine the requirements for successful establishment.
  • Monitor known populations to identify key threats or the progress of recovery, including the effectiveness of management actions and the need to adapt them if necessary; assist existing monitoring programs.
  • Minimise adverse impacts from land management activities at Bankstown Airport.
  • Ensure chemicals or other mechanisms used to eradicate weeds do not have a significant adverse impact on H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06).
  • Ensure road development and maintenance activities (or other infrastructure or development activities as appropriate) in the area where H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) occurs do not adversely impact on this population.
  • Identify, remove and prevent introduction of weeds in the local area, which could become a threat to H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06), especially African Love Grass and Kikuyu Grass, using appropriate methods.
  • Raise awareness of H. sp. Bankstown (R.T.Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) within the local community.
  • Undertake appropriate seed collection and storage and undertake germination trials.
  • Investigate options for establishing additional populations.
  • Documents that may assist in the management of this species include the Bankstown Airport Environmental Strategy 2005 (Bankstown Airport 2005) and the Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (TSSC 2009f).

    The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

    Threat Class Threatening Species References
    Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009) [Listing Advice].
    Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009) [Listing Advice].
    Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009f) [Conservation Advice].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Eragrostis curvula (African Lovegrass, Weeping Lovegrass, Weeping Love Grass, Boer Lovegrass, Weeping Grass) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009) [Listing Advice].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Pennisetum clandestinum (Kikuyu) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009) [Listing Advice].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009f) [Conservation Advice].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation caused by exotic pasture species Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009) [Listing Advice].
    Residential and Commercial Development:Commercial and Industrial Areas:Recreational, commercial and industrial development Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009) [Listing Advice].
    Residential and Commercial Development:Residential and Commercial Development:Habitat modification (clearance and degradation) due to urban development Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009f) [Conservation Advice].
    Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009f) [Conservation Advice].
    Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development of roads and railroads Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009) [Listing Advice].

    Bankstown Airport (2005). Airport Environment Strategy. [Online]. Available from: http://www.bankstownairport.com.au/corporate/CIN045.asp.

    NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change (NSW DECC) (2005o). River-Flat Eucalypt Forest on Coastal Floodplains - profile. [Online]. Available from: http://www.threatenedspecies.environment.nsw.gov.au/tsprofile/profile.aspx?id=10787.

    Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2009). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/81969-listing-advice.pdf.

    Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2009f). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Hibbertia sp. Bankstown (R.T. Miller & C.P.Gibson s.n. 18/10/06). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/81969-conservation-advice.pdf.

    Toelken, H.R. (2000). Notes on Hibbertia (Dilleniaceae) 3. H. sericea and associated species. Journal of the Adelaide Botanical Gardens. 19:1-54.

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    This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

    Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Hibbertia puberula subsp. glabrescens in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 18 Apr 2014 18:54:48 +1000.