Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Acacia peuce
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzl) [Recovery Plan] as Acacia peuce.
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia peuce.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NT:Threatened Species of the Northern Territory-Waddy-wood Acacia peuce (Nano, C., C, Pavey, T. Bowland & R. Kerrigan, 2012) [Information Sheet].
NT:The Impact of Cattle Activity on the Northern Territory Acacia peuce Waddy-wood population (Northern Territory Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport (NT NRETAS), 2005) [Information Sheet].
NT:Recovery action implementation for threatened arid acacias. Distribution, monitoring and Indigenous ecological knowledge of A. peuce, A. undoolyana, A. pickardii & A. latzii (Northern Territory Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport (NT NRETAS), 2008) [Information Sheet].
State Listing Status
NT: Listed as Endangered (Territory Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 2000 (Northern Territory): 2012) as Acacia peuce
QLD: Listed as Vulnerable (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): July 2012) as Acacia peuce
Scientific name Acacia peuce [8301]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author F.Muell.
Infraspecies author  
Reference Mueller, F.J.H. von (1863), Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae 3(23): 151 [tax. nov.]
Other names Racosperma peuce [31582]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images
http://www.nretas.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/10951/Acacia_peuce_EN.pdf

The Birdsville Wattle is a tree up to 18 m high, usually with short horizontal branches and pendulous branchlets. This species is distinctive due to its habit (like a conifer or she-oak) and its large, flat, papery pods containing large, flat seeds (Orchard & Wilson 2001; Bowland & Kerrigan 2002).

This species is known from three disjunct locations situated in south-western Qld and south-eastern NT, on the western and eastern edges of the Simpson Desert (Orchard & Wilson 2001).

The two locations of the species in Qld, 300 km apart, are:
1. 10 to 15 km N of Birdsville on the road to Bedourie; and
2. SSW of Boulia on Montague Downs and Marion Downs stations.
Neither population is within a conservation reserve (BRI undated; Orchard & Wilson 2001).

The smallest of the three known populations of the species occurs in NT, at Andado pastoral lease south of Alice Springs. Here the species has a geographic range of around 20 km and occupies approx. 10 km², mostly within the Mac Clarke Conservation Reserve (Chuk 1982; White et al. 2000). Significant and relatively recent mortality within the remaining mature stands has been recorded by Chuk (1982). Both fire and prolonged waterlogging have been suggested as possible causes of these deaths. More recent evaluations of the stand report considerable seedling recruitment (White et al. 2000).

Locally dominant on stony flats or gibber plains areas between longitudinal dunes or on alluvial flats between ephemeral watercourses (White et al. 2000). The southern populations occur on fixed shallow sand aprons over clay and gibber slopes associated with denuded mesas. In the Boulia area, the species is associated with alluvium and paleochannels (ancient river beds) of the Hamilton and Georgina Rivers (Orchard & Wilson 2001).

Simmons (1988) reported flowering to occur mainly in Mar. and Apr., though Qld Herbarium collection records show flowers in Aug. and Sept. (BRI undated). Pods present Apr. to Aug., and Nov. (BRI undated). Flowering and seed set may correlate with large rainfall events. Germination and seedling establishment are periodic phenomena that culminate over short periods within cycles of above-average rainfall (Bowland & Kerrigan 2002). The species is known to coppice after root damage (Simmons 1988).

It is a slow growing tree with very dense wood, which has been used for fence posts in the past and is still a source for Aboriginal clubs (Pedley 1979; Orchard & Wilson 2001). Individuals may live for 500 years or longer (Bowland & Kerrigan 2002).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzl) [Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat alteration (vegetation, soil, hydrology) due to trampling and grazing by livestock National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzl) [Recovery Plan].
Acacia peuce in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006s) [Internet].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Increased competitor and/or predator activity associated with artificial watering points National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzl) [Recovery Plan].
Biological Resource Use:Gathering Terrestrial Plants:Recreational harvest Acacia peuce in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006s) [Internet].
Biological Resource Use:Logging and Wood Harvesting:Habitat loss, modification and degradation due to timber harvesting National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzl) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Storms and Flooding:Risks associated with lighting strike National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzl) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) Acacia peuce in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006s) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) National recovery plan for threatened Acacias and Ricinocarpos gloria-medii in central Australia (Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzl) [Recovery Plan].
Acacia peuce in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006s) [Internet].

Bowland, T. and R. Kerrigan (2002). Threatened species of the Northern Territory - Acacia peuce. Page(s) 3. [Online]. Parks & Wildlife Commission NT. Available from: http://www.nt.gov.au/nreta/wildlife/animals/threatened/pdf/plants/Acacia_peuce_EN.pdf.

Chuk, M. (1982). The status and ecology of Acacia peuce in the Northern Territory. Techinical Report of the Conservation Commission of the Northern Territory. 2. Conservation Commission of the NT, Alice Springs.

Fairbain, E. (1992). Australian Timbers. Department of Natural Resources, Indooroopilly.

Orchard, A.E. & A.J.G. Wilson (eds) (2001). Flora of Australia, Volume 11A, Mimosaceae, Acacia Part 1.

Pedley, L. (1979). A Revision of Acacia Mill. in Queensland. Austrobaileya. 1(3):235-337.

Queensland Herbarium (2008b). Unpublished data.

Simmons, M (1988). Acacias of Australia. Ringwood, Vic., Viking O'Neil Penguin Books Aust.

White, M., D. Albrecht, A. Duguid, P. Latz & M. Hamilton (2000). Plant species and sites of botanical significance in the Southern Bioregions of the Northern Territory. Volume 1: Significant Vascular Plants. Arid Lands Environment Centre. Alice Springs, NT.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia peuce in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 17 Apr 2014 09:39:43 +1000.