Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered as Acacia equisetifolia
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2006bl) [Listing Advice].
 
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium = Acacia equestifolia (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008zp) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (43) (14/08/2006) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2006g) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium.
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178, 181 and 183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (160) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2014h) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806).
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178, 181 and 183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (163) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2014j) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia equisetifolia.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NT:Threatened Species of the Northern Territory - Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (Kerrigan, R., I. Cowie & K. Brennan, 2006) [Information Sheet].
State Listing Status
NT: Listed as Critically Endangered (Territory Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 2000 (Northern Territory): 2012 list) as Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium
Scientific name Acacia equisetifolia [87480]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Maslin & Cowie
Infraspecies author  
Reference Maslin, B.R. & Cowie, I.D., (2014) Acacia equisetifolia, a rare, new species of Acacia sect. Lycopodiifoliae (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) from the Top End of the Northern Territory. Nuytsia 24: 2-4, Fig. 1 [tax. nov.]
Other names Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (DNA D19063) [79225]
Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium [81625]
Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) [87195]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.nretas.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/10939/Acacia_graveside_CR.pdf

Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge was previously collected in Kakadu National Park in 1981. At that time it was identified as Acacia hippuroides, a Western Australian species, to which it is closely related. Vague locality details and the lack of additional collections in the following years led botanists at the NT Herbarium to doubt the validity of this collection (DIPE 2006).

Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge is a very distinct, grey-green shrub immediately obvious in the field although vegetatively similar to Drummondita calida. The leaves are narrow and needle-like, 10-15 mm long, hairy and arranged in whorls around the stem. The inflorescence is globular and the pods are short. It is closely related to A. hippuroides, a Kimberley (Western Australia) species (DIPE 2006).

A summary of plant collections across the Northern Territory shows that Kakadu National Park is a jurisdiction with one of the highest records/km2 in the Northern Territory. This is a result of numerous surveys and collection trips which are too extensive to list here. The number of collections recorded from the quarter degree grid cell where this taxon was found has 1530 plant records. This collection effort offers confidence that our current knowledge provides an accurate reflection of the extent and abundance of Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge. There are inaccessible, remote and diverse areas of the Park that remain unsurveyed and other populations may exist (Kerrigan 2003).

The only locality of Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge is in Kakadu National Park. While this Park is not currently managed for this species, Parks Australia provided funding for the survey work carried out by Kerrigan (2003, 2004) and Cowie (2004).

Very little is known about the habitat of Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge. Collection notes record it as growing on a rocky sandstone slope at cliff line in sandstone woodland (DIPE 2006).
Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge occurred with Corymbia arnhemensis and Eucalyptus miniata gigantangion over sandstone with Templetonia hookeri and Triodia plectrachnoides (DIPE 2006).

Specimens of Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge were fruiting when collected in March and October (DIPE 2006).

Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge appears to be an obligate seeder currently exposed to unfavourable fire regimes. Russell-Smith et al. (1998, 2002) suggest that in some cases current fire regimes are impacting on obligate seeders in sandstone heath communities and inappropriate fire regimes are a potential threat to this species.

Unfortunately the generation time for this species has not been assessed and the potential for frequent fire events to kill individuals before reproductive maturity has not been evaluated. Similarly, seed bank stores, seed longevity and germination and establishment requirements are unknown. With such a small population size and limited distribution the species is vulnerable to catastrophic events such as inappropriate fire regimes.

A fire in late 2003 or early 2004 has reduced the likelihood of an imminent fire but as fuel loads increase fire becomes increasingly probable. Although little is known about the seed bank longevity of this taxon there is little doubt that a fire event at this locality, before seedlings have reached reproductive maturity, is likely to kill all living individuals (DIPE 2006).

Threat abatement strategies for Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge will be dependent on the outcomes of research suggested under 'Management Documentation' (see below) (DIPE 2006).

No targeted surveys of Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge have been undertaken. However, survey of potential habitat by Kerrigan (2003, 2004) and Cowie (2004) did not uncover additional populations (DIPE 2006).

No management plans have been prepared for Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge although Kerrigan (2004) suggested:

  • that regular monitoring in the short term is required to establish the persistence of seedlings and time taken to reproductive maturity;
  • further survey is required to locate other populations;
  • research into the role of fire and other ecological processes in the distribution and abundance of the species is required; and
  • collection of propagation material and translocation to botanic gardens may protect the species from stochastic fire events.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2006bl) [Listing Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2006bl) [Listing Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia sp. Graveside Gorge (V.J.Levitzke 806) NT Herbarium = Acacia equestifolia (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008zp) [Conservation Advice].

Cowie, I. (2004). Kakadu Threatened Flora Report. Results of a threatened flora survey, November 2004. Unpublished report to Parks Australia North from the Northern Territory Herbarium.

Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment (DIPE) (2006). Biodiversity Conservation Section, Northern Territory Government.

Kerrigan, R.A. (2003). Kakadu Threatened Flora Report. Results of a threatened flora survey. Unpublished report to Parks Australia North from the Northern Territory Herbarium.

Kerrigan, R.A. (2004). Kakadu Threatened Flora Report. Results of a threatened flora survey. Unpublished report to Parks Australia North from the Northern Territory Herbarium.

Russell-Smith, J., P. G. Ryan, D. Klessa, G. Waight and R. Harwood (1998). Fire regimes, fire-sensitive vegetation and fire manage ment of the sandstone Arnhem Plateau, monsoonal northern Australia. Journal of Applied Ecology. 35 (6):829-846. British Ecological Society, Blackwell Press.

Russell-Smith, J., P.G. Ryan & D.C. Cheal (2002). Fire regimes and the conservation of sandstone heath in monsoonal northern Australia: frequency, interval, patchiness. Biological Conservation. 104:91-107.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia equisetifolia in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:20:59 +1000.