Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Grevillea glossadenia (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ql) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Vulnerable (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list)
Scientific name Grevillea glossadenia [7979]
Family Proteaceae:Proteales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author McGillivray
Infraspecies author  
Reference Telopea 1 (28 Jul. 1975) 21.
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images
http://www.anbg.gov.au/images/photo_cd/301610241712/051.html
http://www.anbg.gov.au/images/photo_cd/630930713429/062.html

Scientific name: Grevillea glossadenia

Grevillea glossadenia is a compact, dense, grey-brown shrub to 2 m tall. Leaves are elliptic with slightly recurved margins, have a silky, prominently veined lower surface and grow to 12 cm long. Deep, yellow-orange to orange-red flowers occur in loose clusters (Makinson 2000b; Wrigley & Fagg 1989).

Grevillea glossadenia occurs in north-east Queensland mainly in the Einasleigh Uplands Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA) bioregion, with a few collections from the Wet Tropics Bioregion (ALA 2013). It mainly occurs between Walkamin, Irvinebank, Herberton and Watsonville (Makinson 2000b; Olde & Marriott 1995). Localities include Mount Emerald, Mount Misery, Cooloomon Creek, Little Cooloomon Creek, Emu Creek, Granite Creek and Barkerville (Queensland Herbarium 2008b). Olde and Marriott (1995a) reported this species as occurring west of Chillagoe but it is now believed that this record refers to G. decora (Forster 2001 pers. comm.).

No collections have been made in protected areas (ALA 2013). The species has been in cultivation for more than 20 years and is widely cultivated in Queensland (Olde & Marriott 1995a; Wrigley & Fagg 1989).

Grevillea glossadenia grows in eucalypt woodland or low open forest, in shallow to skeletal granitic soils on rolling hills, gravel terraces near stream beds, and along roadsides and mining tracks (Makinson 2000b; Queensland Herbarium 2008). It occurs in areas of 1000–1300 mm rainfall and has been recorded as being able to tolerate frosts as low as -8 °C (Olde & Marriott 1995a).

Associated plant species include Gympie Messmate (Eucalyptus cloeziana), E. pachycalyx, Ramornie Stringybark (E. tindaliae), Cullen's Ironbark (E. cullenii), E. atrata, Range Bloodwood (Corymbia abergiana), Yellow Jacket (C. leichhardtii), White Bloodwood (C. trachyphloia), C. watsoniana, Lemon-scented Gum (C. citriodora), Northern Cypress Pine (Callitris intratropica), Red Ash (Alphitonia excelsa), Acacia purpureopetala, Homoranthus porteri, Leptospermum amboinense and Xanthorrhoea johnsonii (Gleed 2005; Queensland Herbarium 2008b).

Grevillea glossadenia flowers year round, but mainly in April to August and, in its natural environment, probably regenerates from seed only (Makinson 2000b). This species may favour disturbed sites (McGillivray 1993).

Grevillea glossadenia has been successfully grown ex-situ from seed, cuttings and grafts on Silky Oak (G. robusta) and G. 'Poorinda Anticipation' (Olde & Marriott 1995a). Seeds will germinate freely if given the standard peeling treatment, but cuttings are generally slow to produce roots (Olde & Marriott 1995a).

All Grevilleas are protandrous (anthers release their pollen before the stigma of the same flower is receptive) and hermaphroditic (male and female parts on flowers) (Collins & Rebelo 1987). The general foraging of pollinators (particularly birds and insects) facilitates both outcrossing and self-pollination (Collins & Rebelo 1987). Birds, mammals and arthropods have been identified as visitors to the inflorescences of many species in the Proteaceae family (Collins & Rebelo 1987; Olde & Marriott 1995a) and the most common visitors to Australian plant species in this plant family are honeyeaters, lorikeets, silvereyes and forty other bird species that may be important visitors (Collins & Rebelo 1987). For those Proteaceae species that rely on arthropods for pollination it is possible that only the larger moths, bees and beetles are important pollinators (Collins & Rebelo 1987). In most Grevilleas, the fruit set is low relative to the number of flowers produced (Collins & Rebelo 1987).

The main potential threats to Grevillea glossadenia are: disturbance associated with mining operations, invasive weeds, and extinction associated with stochastic events (ANRA 2009; Gleed 2005; Radke & Radke 1983). Habitat associated with this species is infested in places by many weeds, particularly Sisal (Agave sisalana) and Panic Grass (Panicum maximum), which may prevent growth of Grevillea glossadenia (Gleed 2005).

Managment documents relevant to Grevillea glossadenia are at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Grevillea glossadenia in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ko) [Internet].
Energy Production and Mining:Mining and Quarrying:Habitat destruction, disturbance and/or modification due to mining activities Grevillea glossadenia in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ko) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Panicum maximum (Guinea Grass, Green Panic, Hamil Grass) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Grevillea glossadenia (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ql) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Grevillea glossadenia (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ql) [Conservation Advice].
Protected status:Protected status:Lack of secure conservation land tenure Grevillea glossadenia in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ko) [Internet].
Species Stresses:Species Stresses:unspecified Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Grevillea glossadenia (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ql) [Conservation Advice].

Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) (2013). Atlas of Living Australia. [Online]. Available from: http://www.ala.org.au/.

Australian Natural Resources Atlas (ANRA) (2009). Biodiversity Assessment - Species at risk and their Recovery Process. [Online]. Available from: http://www.anra.gov.au/topics/vegetation/assessment/index.html. [Accessed: 24-Apr-2010].

Collins, B.G. & T. Rebelo (1987). Pollination Biology of the Proteaceae in Australia and southern Africa. Australian Journal of Ecology. 12:387-421.

Forster, P.I. (2001). Personal Communication.

Gleed, S. (2005). Revegetation guidelines and recommendations for Gibbs Creek, Irvinebank. [Online]. Available from: http://www.mitchell-river.com.au/publications/Gibbs%20Creek%20-%20ILG%20Report.pdf.

Makinson, R.O. (2000b). Proteaceae 2 - Grevillea. In: Flora of Australia. 17A:1-524. Melbourne: ABRS/CSIRO.

McGillivray, D.J. (1993). Grevillea (Proteaceae): a taxonomic revision. Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Press.

Olde, P.M. & N.R. Marriott (1995). The Grevillea Book; Volume 2. Kenthurst, NSW: Kangaroo Press.

Olde, P.M. & N.R. Marriott (1995a). The Grevillea Book; Volume 3. Kenthurst, NSW: Kangaroo Press.

Queensland Herbarium (2008b). Unpublished data.

Radke, P. & A. Radke (1983). Grevilleas of the Atherton Tablelands. Australian Plants. 12 No. 97:210-213.

Wrigley, J.W. & M. Fagg (1989). Banksias, Waratahs and Grevilleas and all other plants in the Australian Proteaceae family. Sydney, NSW: William Collins Publishers.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Grevillea glossadenia in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:19:34 +1000.