Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
 
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Amytornis barbatus barbatus (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ye) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey Guidelines for Australia's Threatened Birds. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.2 (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2010l) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (31/01/2005) (Grey Grasswren (Bulloo), Black-throated Finch (southern)) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2005l) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Grey Grasswren endangered species listing. NSW Scientific Committee-final determination (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2004) [Internet].
NSW:Grey Grasswren - profile (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2005x) [Internet].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Endangered (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013 list)
QLD: Listed as Rare* (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): Near Threatened species: May 2014 list )
SA: Listed as Rare* (National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (South Australia): Rare species: June 2011 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
NGO: Listed as Endangered (The Action Plan for Australian Birds 2010)
Scientific name Amytornis barbatus barbatus [67065]
Family Maluridae:Passeriformes:Aves:Chordata:Animalia
Species author Favaloro & McEvey, 1968
Infraspecies author  
Reference Schodde, R. & Christidis, L. 1987. Genetic differentiation and subspeciation in the Grey Grasswren Amytornis barbatus (Maluridae). The Emu 87(3): 189
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Queensland: At the species level, Amytornis barbartus is listed as Near Threatened under the Nature Conservation Act 1992. This listing also covers the Bulloo subspecies.

South Australia: At the species level, Amytornis barbartus is listed as Rare under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972. This listing also covers the Bulloo subspecies.

Scientific name: Amytornis barbatus barbatus.

Common name: Grey Grasswren (Bulloo).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is a conventionally accepted subspecies of the Grey Grasswren (Schodde & Christidis 1987; Schodde & Mason 1999).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is a small bird about 18 to 21 cm long. It has a wingspan of about 17 to 21 cm and a mass of about 15 to 21 g (Hardy 2002; Higgins et al. 2001). The adults are brown with white streaking on the upperbody, and mainly white on the underbody, but with some black streaks on the breast, and a pale red-brown tinge to the flanks and thighs. They have a distinctive pattern on the head, which consists of a white face; black marks around the eyes, and on the throat, ears and cheeks; and black and white streaks across the top of the head. They have a grey-black to black bill, dark brown irides, and dark grey-brown to grey-black legs and feet. Adult males and females appear similar, but the females can be distinguished by the narrower black markings on the face, and the slightly less extensive and slightly fainter streaks on the breast (Higgins et al. 2001).

Juveniles are broadly similar to the adults, but they appear shorter and more fluffy, and have a more square tip to the tail (the tip of the tail is graduated in the adults). They are duller and darker brown on the upperbody, and have duller and less extensive markings on the face. They do not have any streaking on the breast, and they have a pale grey bill, an obvious cream gape, and paler purplish-grey feet and legs. Juvenile males and females are alike. Immatures can not be separated from the adults in the field (Higgins et al. 2001).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) occurs singly and in pairs and small groups (Chapman 1996; Cooper 1989; Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Hardy 2002; Robinson 1973; Schodde 1982). It can occur in high densities (and is claimed to sometimes congregate in groups of 30 or 40 birds) in small patches of suitable habitat during drought conditions (Hardy 2002; Schodde 1982).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) occurs on floodplains in the drainage basin of the Bulloo River, in southwestern Queensland and northwestern NSW (Barrett et al. 2003; Blakers et al. 1984; Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Schodde & Christidis 1987; Schodde & Mason 1999). In Queensland, it has been recorded at Tickalara Station, and near the NSW border at Wompah Gate and Adelaide Gate, and there is a possible record from the Wilson River in the Grey Range (Britton & Britton 1990; Carpenter 2002; Hardy 2002; Higgins et al. 2001; Stewart 1984). In NSW, it has been recorded between Wompah Gate and Adelaide Gate, east to near Bindara, and south through Caryapundy Swamp to Connulpie Station, Teurika Station and the northern margin of the Bulloo Overflow (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Higgins et al. 2001; McAllan 2000; McAllan & Cooper 1995; Morris 2002, 2004, 2006; Morris & Burton 1999; Robinson 1973).

The Grey Grasswren has also been recorded in the Cooper Creek system (including one report from Embarka Waterhole in northeastern South Australia), and at Lake Cudappan, which lies between the Cooper and Diamantina River systems in southwestern Queensland (Carpenter 2002; Schodde & Christidis 1987). However, it has not been established whether these sightings represent populations of the Bulloo subspecies of the Grey Grasswren. The Embarka Waterhole and Lake Cudappan populations had been presumed to consist of birds of the Diamantina River subspecies of the Grey Grasswren, A. b. diamantina (Schodde & Christidis 1987). However, some populations found on the Cooper Creek system in southwestern Queensland are geographically closer to the Bulloo River (subspecies barbatus) than they are to the Diamantina River (subspecies diamantina) (Carpenter 2002), and the possibility that these populations (and perhaps the other outlying populations at Embarka Waterhole and Lake Cudappan) consist of birds of the Bulloo subspecies can not be excluded.

The extent of occurrence is estimated, with medium reliability, to be 100 km². It is impossible to determine if there has been any long-term change in the extent of occurrence because the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) was recorded on only two occasions prior to 1967 (in 1921 and 1942) (Chenery 1922; Favaloro & McEvey 1968; McAllan 2000) and thus a comparison between the historical and current distribution is not possible. However, the small number of opportunistic records that have been reported since 1967 (Barrett et al. 2003; Blakers et al. 1984; McAllan & Cooper 1995; Robinson 1973) suggest that the extent of occurrence has remained basically unchanged (Garnett & Crowley 2000) for the past 40 or so years.

The area of occupancy is estimated, with medium reliability, to be 100 km². As with estimates of the extent of occurrence, the paucity of records prior to 1967 make it impossible to determine if there has been any long-term change in the area of occupancy (Chenery 1922; Favaloro & McEvey 1968; McAllan 2000). However, the small number of opportunistic records that have been reported since 1967 (Barrett et al. 2003; Blakers et al. 1984; McAllan & Cooper 1995; Robinson 1973) suggest that the area of occupancy has remained basically unchanged (Garnett & Crowley 2000) for the past 40 or so years.

Given that the entire known population of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) occurs in a single location (the Bulloo River drainage basin), the population is vulnerable to catastrophic events such as fire, severe drought, or any single event that affects the entire location (Garnett & Crowley 2000).

There are no captive populations of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (ISIS 2006d). No population re-introductions have been attempted or proposed.

The distribution and habitat of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) are severely, but naturally, fragmented. The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) inhabits isolated patches of dense vegetation that are subject to seasonal inundation (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Garnett 1993; Hardy 2002; Higgins et al. 2001; McAllan & Cooper 1995; Robinson 1973; Rowley & Russell 1997; Schodde 1982). These patches are often separated from one another by sand dunes and areas of open ground, and it is likely that these areas of unsuitable habitat prevent the birds from moving between the isolated patches of preferred habitat (TSSC 2005u).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) has been poorly surveyed. Its distribution is known only from a small number of opportunistic records. There have not been any broad-scale targeted surveys for the subspecies, but an intensive survey over two days in the Caryapundy Swamp in July 2006 failed to locate any birds (Hardy 2006, pers. comm.).

The population size of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is poorly known. This is because no broad-scale surveys have been conducted to establish numbers or population densities. The population was speculatively estimated at 10 000 breeding birds in 2000 (Garnett & Crowley 2000), but the population size has probably suffered a major decline since this estimate was made due to the severe drought conditions that have been prevalent in recent years, and to grazing by rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus and rooting (digging) by feral pigs Sus scrofa, which have combined to greatly reduce the amount of suitable habitat that is available. The impact of these processes is illustrated by an intensive survey in the Caryapundy Swamp in July 2006 which failed to locate a single bird (Hardy 2006, pers. comm.).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is claimed to occur in a single, contiguous population (Garnett & Crowley 2000). However, it inhabits isolated patches of dense vegetation that are separated from one another by unsuitable habitat, and it is likely that this unsuitable habitat prevents the birds from moving between the isolated patches of its preferred habitat (TSSC 2005u). Furthermore, the Grey Grasswren has been recorded at a few locations between the Diamantina River (subspecies A. b. diamantina) and the Bulloo River (subspecies A. b. barbatus). The subspecific status of these populations is unknown (Carpenter 2002; Schodde & Christidis 1987), so they could potentially be additional and discrete populations of the Bulloo River subspecies. On the basis of this information, it seems possible that there could be multiple, isolated subpopulations of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo).

The lack of information on numbers and population densities makes an analysis of population trends extremely difficult. However, the severe drought conditions that have been prevalent in recent years, in combination with the effect of grazing by rabbits and rooting (digging) by feral pigs, have greatly reduced the area of suitable habitat that is available to the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo), and have probably caused a major decline in population size (Hardy 2006, pers. comm.). The fact that there are a number of potentially threatening processes operating in areas occupied by the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) suggests that the population may have declined prior to the recent drought, but no data are available to confirm this (TSSC 2005u).

The area of occupancy of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is subject to extreme natural fluctuations during drought conditions (TSSC 2005u). This is because the birds congregate and seek refuge in patches of optimal habitat during periods of drought, when there is less suitable habitat available (Hardy 2002; Schodde 1982).

The generation length is estimated, with low reliability, to be three years (Garnett & Crowley 2000).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is not known to cross-breed with the Diamantina River subspecies of the Grey Grasswren, A. b. diamantina, or with any other species.

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) does not occur in any conservation reserves. It has only been recorded on a small number of leasehold properties that are managed for grazing purposes (TSSC 2005u).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) occurs on periodically-inundated swampy floodplains in the Bulloo River drainage basin. It inhabits patches of dense vegetation that are comprised of thickets of Muehlenbeckia cunninghamii, 1.0 to 2.5 m tall, with clumps of Eragrostis australasica, about 1 or 2 m tall, and/or clumps of Atriplex nummularia (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Hardy 2002; Higgins et al. 2001; McAllan & Cooper 1995; Robinson 1973; Rowley & Russell 1997; Schodde 1982). It also sometimes occurs in areas of Halosarcia pergranulata that lie adjacent to more typical habitat (McAllan & Cooper 1995).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) congregates in high densities in small and isolated patches of habitat that persist and provide refuge during drought conditions (Hardy 2002; Schodde 1982).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) does not occur in any of the threatened ecological communities listed under the EPBC Act 1999. It is not known to associate with any other threatened species or subspecies listed under the EPBC Act 1999.

Banding studies have shown that the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is capable of living for more than three years in the wild (Hardy 2002). No information is available on the ages of sexual maturity or natural mortality.

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) has been recorded breeding in July and August (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Hardy 2002; Robinson 1973; Schodde 1982). It builds a semi-domed nest that is made of grass and lined with soft grass, plant down, rootlets and sometimes a few feathers (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Robinson 1973). The nest, which has a large opening in one side, is placed close to the ground in a clump of Eragrostis australasica or Muehlenbeckia cunninghamii (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Hardy 2002; Robinson 1973).

Clutches consist of two or possibly three eggs (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Robinson 1973; Hardy 2006, pers. comm.). The eggs are white and have spots and blotches of brown that often form a cap around the broader end (Favaloro & McEvey 1968). The role of the adults in incubation, and the duration of the incubation period, have not been specifically recorded for the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo), but at the species level, incubation in the Grey Grasswren is by the female only (Rowley & Russell 1997; Schodde 1982), and the incubation period, although unknown, is likely to be about 13 to 15 days in length (as recorded for the Striated Grasswren A. striatus) (Hutton 1991a; Rowley & Russell 1997; Schodde 1982).

The young are fed by both parents (Robinson 1973). The role of the adults in brooding, and the duration of the nestling period, have not been specifically recorded for the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo), but at the species level, brooding in the Grey Grasswren is by the female only (Rowley & Russell 1997), and the nestling period, although unknown, is likely to about 12 to 14 days in length (as recorded for the Striated Grasswren) (Hutton 1991a; Rowley & Russell 1997). The young accompany their parents for several weeks (and sometimes possibly for several months) after departing the nest (Higgins et al. 2001; Robinson 1973; Schodde 1982).

The breeding success of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) has not been quantified. No causes of breeding failure have been identified.

The diet of the Gray Grasswren (Bulloo) consists of seeds and insects (including ants and beetles) (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Robinson 1973).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) gleans (pecks) food items from the ground (in open areas of short grass) and in shrubs (Chapman 1996; Robinson 1973; Schodde 1982).

The Grey Grasswren is described, at the species level, as being sedentary (Schodde & Christidis 1987) and resident (Rowley & Russell 1997). Its restricted distribution, occurrence in small and apparently isolated populations, and geographical variation suggest that few, if any, movements occur (Higgins et al. 2001). It is claimed that family groups abandon their territories and wander locally at the completion of the breeding season, and that, when the breeding season begins again, parties disperse into territorial pairs (Schodde 1982).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) appears to make some short-distance movements in response to seasonal conditions. During floods, it seems to move into dry areas at the margins of its preferred habitat, and then returns to its normal habitats again in drier years (Hardy 2002; Higgins et al. 2001; McAllan & Cooper 1995). During drought, it seems to congregate in large groups in patches of remaining suitable habitat (Hardy 2002; Schodde 1982).

Pairs of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) occupy territories of about 0.5 to 2.0 ha during the breeding season (Hardy 2002; Schodde 1982).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) could be confused with the Diamantina River subspecies of the Grey Grasswren, A. b. diamantina, which is very similar in appearance, but it is unlikely to be confused with any other species (Higgins et al. 2001).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is described as secretive and elusive, and is said to usually be difficult to observe (Robinson 1973). However, it sometimes perches (and is readily visible) in the upper branches of Muehlenbecki cunninghamii and Atriplex, or at the top of clumps of Eragrostis australasica (Favaloro & McEvey 1968; Marr 1991; Robinson 1973).

The recommended method for surveying for the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is to conduct area searches or transect surveys in patches of suitable habitat (Birds Australia 2006, pers. comm.). The use of mist nests, placed from the ground up in clumps of Muehlenbeckia cunninghamii, is also effective (Hardy 2002). The birds can be detected by sight, or by identification of the call (Robinson 1973). It is recommended that surveys be conducted early in the morning (Hardy 2002), although calls may be heard into the evening (Marr 1991).

The only current accepted threat to the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is the degradation and loss of its habitat. The known sources of habitat loss and degradation are grazing and trampling by cattle Bos, grazing by rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus, and rooting (digging) by feral pigs Sus scrofa. The application of unsuitable fire regimes might also have an adverse effect on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) habitat. The impact of all of these processes is (or is likely to be) more severe during dry conditions (Garnett & Crowley 2000; Hardy 2002, 2006, pers. comm.; McAllan & Cooper 1995; TSSC 2005u). The threat posed by cattle grazing may be less severe than is believed, given that the Bulloo region has been subjected to grazing for more than a century (Garnett 1993), and cattle densities are likely to be lower now than they were in the past (Palmer 1994). There is some possibility that the habitat could come under pressure in future from the spread of invasive and noxious weeds (such as Parthenium and Prosopis) (TSSC 2005u), or the diversion of water from the Bulloo River. However, there are no current plans for water to be diverted from the Bulloo River, or for any other detrimental land use to occur (Garnett 1993; Garnett & Crowley 2000).

Another potential threat to the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is predation by feral cats Felis catus and foxes Vulpes vulpes. The extent of predation is unknown; it is thought to occur (TSSC 2005u), but one study found that, although cats were numerous in the Bulloo River region, there was no evidence that they were preying upon the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Hardy 2002).

Drought exacerbates the extent of habitat loss and degradation (Hardy 2002; TSSC 2005u) and, because the birds congregate in high densities in small patches of habitat during dry conditions (Hardy 2002, 2006, pers. comm.; Schodde 1982), drought also renders the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) more vulnerable to potentially catastrophic events such as fire (TSSC 2005u).

The long-term survival of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) mainly depends on maintaining the extent and quality of its habitat (Garnett & Crowley 2000; Hardy 2002; NPWS 2003; TSSC 2005u).

The Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is listed under the EPBC Act 1999, and a draft recovery plan has been produced for the birds that occur in NSW (NPWS 2003). No other specific recovery actions have been introduced or attempted, although the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) is likely to benefit from general efforts by land managers to control feral animals such as rabbits and pigs (McAllan & Cooper 1995).

The following specific recovery actions were recommended in the draft recovery plan for the Grey Grasswren in NSW (NPWS 2003) and by the TSSC (2005u):

  • Assess and map suitable habitat in the Bulloo River drainage basin.

  • Survey suitable habitat to locate additional populations.

  • Monitor population size.

  • Introduce measures to mitigate the impact (or potential impact) of feral animals.

  • Develop a fire management plan for Bulloo River region.

  • Liaise with land managers to develop and implement appropriate strategies to manage grasswren habitat.

  • Liaise with interstate conservation agencies to coordinate the exchange of information and the implementation of recovery actions.

  • Liaise with state and federal authorities to ensure that the needs of the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) are taken into account when considering any changes to existing water management regimes.

There have only been two published major studies on the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo): a banding study conducted at Pyampa Station, in southwestern Queensland (Hardy 2002); and a comparison of the morphology and genetics of Grey Grasswren specimens from the Bulloo River drainage system and Goyder Lagoon, in the Diamantina River drainage system (Schodde & Christidis 1987).

A draft recovery plan has been prepared for the Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) population in NSW (NPWS 2003).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat alteration (vegetation, soil, hydrology) due to trampling and grazing by livestock Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Droughts:Drought Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Prosopis spp. (Mesquite, Algaroba) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by unspecified weeds Parthenium hysterophorus (Parthenium Weed, Bitter Weed, Carrot Grass, False Ragweed) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Vulpes vulpes (Red Fox, Fox) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Capra hircus (Goat) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Amytornis barbatus barbatus (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ye) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Equus caballus (Horse) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Amytornis barbatus barbatus (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ye) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Sus scrofa (Pig) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Alterations to hydrology through water extraction Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Amytornis barbatus barbatus (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ye) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2005u) [Listing Advice].

Barrett, G., A. Silcocks, S. Barry, R. Cunningham & R. Poulter (2003). The New Atlas of Australian Birds. Melbourne, Victoria: Birds Australia.

Birds Australia (2006). Personal communication. October 2006.

Blakers, M., S.J.J.F. Davies & P.N. Reilly (1984). The Atlas of Australian Birds. Melbourne, Victoria: Melbourne University Press.

Britton, P.L. & H.A. Britton (1990). The Queensland Ornithological Society Bird Report, 1988. Sunbird. 20:18--32.

Carpenter, G. (2002). The Grey Grasswren on Cooper Creek, south-west Queensland. Sunbird. 32:52-54.

Chapman, G.S. (1996). The grasswrens: A brief pictorial. Wingspan. 6:20-27.

Chenery, A. (1922). Notes on birds seen during the a recent visit to the western Darling, New South Wales. Part 3. South Australian Ornithologist. 6:153-155.

Cooper, R.M. (Ed.) (1989). 1985 New South Wales Bird Report. Australian Birds. 22:1--40.

Favaloro, N.J. & A. McEvey (1968). A new species of Australian grass-wren. Memoirs of the National Museum of Victoria. 28:1-9.

Garnett, S.T., ed. (1993). Threatened and Extinct Birds of Australia. Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union Report 82 2nd (corrected) Edition. Melbourne: Royal Australian Ornithology Union and Canberra: Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Garnett, S.T. & G.M. Crowley (2000). The Action Plan for Australian Birds 2000. [Online]. Canberra, ACT: Environment Australia and Birds Australia. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/action/birds2000/index.html.

Hardy, J. (2006). Personal communication. December 2006.

Hardy, J.W. (2002). A banding study of the Grey Grasswren Amytornis barbatus barbatus in the Carypundy Swamp of south-western Queensland. Corella. 26:106-109.

Higgins, P.J., J.M. Peter & W.K. Steele (Eds) (2001). Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds. Volume Five - Tyrant-flycatchers to Chats. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Hutton, R.H. (1991a). Australian softbill management. Singil Press, NSW Australia.

International Species Information System (ISIS) (2006d). Locations of captive species of birds. [Online]. www.isis.org. [Accessed: 30-May-2006].

Marr, N. (1991). Those grasswrens!. Bird Observer. 712:92.

McAllan, I.A.W. (2000). On some New South Wales records of the Grey Grasswren and the Thick-billed Grasswren. Australian Bird Watcher. 18:244-246.

McAllan, I.A.W. & R.M. Cooper (1995). The distribution of the Grey Grasswren in New South Wales. Australian Birds. 28:65-70.

Morris, A.K. (2002). New South Wales Annual Bird Report 2000. Australian Birds. 33:1-75.

Morris, A.K. (2004). New South Wales Annual Bird Report 2002. Australian Birds. 33:165-242.

Morris, A.K. (2006). New South Wales Annual Bird Report 2003. Australian Birds. 33:249-328.

Morris, A.K. & A. Burton (1999). New South Wales Annual Bird Report 1996. Australian Birds. 31:86-137.

New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) (2003). Grey Grasswren (Amytornis barbatus) Draft Recovery Plan. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service, Hurstville, New South Wales.

Palmer, R.H. (1994). A miracle of recovery. In: Lunney D, S. Hand, P. Reed, & D. Butcher, eds. Future of the Fauna of Western New South Wales. Page(s) 193-200. Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman, New South Wales.

Robinson, L. (1973). The Grey Grass-Wren. Australian Bird Watcher. 4:251-256.

Rowley, I. & E. Russell (1997). Fairy-Wrens and Grasswrens. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

Schodde, R. (1982). The Fairy-Wrens. A Monograph of the Maluridae. Lansdowne Editions, Melbourne.

Schodde, R. & I.J. Mason (1999). The Directory of Australian Birds: Passerines. Melbourne, Victoria: CSIRO.

Schodde, R. & L. Christidis (1987). Genetic differentiation and subspeciation in the Grey Grasswren Amytornis barbatus (Maluridae). Emu. 87:188-192.

Stewart, D.A. (1984). Queensland Bird Report, 1983. Sunbird. 14:45-65.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2005u). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Grey Grasswren (Bulloo) (Amytornis barbatus barbatus). [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/amytornis-barbatus-barbatus.html.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Amytornis barbatus barbatus in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:55:26 +1000.