Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on ten species of Bats (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2001a) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey Guidelines for Australia's Threatened Bats. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.1 (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2010m) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (29/03/2001) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2001h) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NT:Threatened Species of the Northern Territory-Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus (Milne, D. & J. Woinarski, 2006) [Information Sheet].
QLD:Bare-rumped sheathtail bat (Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (Qld DEHP), 2013g) [State Action Plan].
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Endangered (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list)
Scientific name Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus [66889]
Family Emballonuridae:Chiroptera:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author  
Infraspecies author  
Reference Milne, D. J., Jackling, F. C., Sidhu, M., and Appleton, B. J. (2009). Wildlife Research 36, 496-508.
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus

Other scientific names: Recent synonyms for this species include Saccolaimus nudicluniatus, Taphozous saccolaimus and Taphozous nudicluniatus.

Common name: Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat.

Other names: Naked-rumped Sheathtail Bat, Naked-rumped Freetail Bat, Naked-tailed Saccolaimus, Pouched Bat, Tomb Bat.

There are differing opinions regarding the taxonomic status of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat in Australia and taxonomic clarification is required. Australian forms were first described as a full species, Taphozous nudicluniatus (De Vis 1905). Subsequently this species was placed in the genus Saccolaimus based on cranial, dental and external morphology. This species was later synonymised with Taphozous (= Saccolaimus) saccolaimus (Chimimba & Kitchener 1991; Goodwin 1979). Some authors have considered S. s. nudicluniatus to be a subspecies of the widespread S. saccolaimus (for example, Koopman 1984; Flannery 1995a, b). However, the validity of the subspecific status of S. s. nudicluniatus has been questioned (Goodwin 1979).

Based on current distributional information, the north-eastern Queensland and Northern Territory populations occur in geographically separate areas, which are a large distance apart (Churchill 1998; Menkhorst & Knight 2001). These two populations may possibly represent two different subspecies or species. The sub-species Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus has been referred to the north-eastern Queensland population (Koopman 1994) but the status of the Northern Territory population has not been considered (Duncan et al. 1999; McKean et al. 1981, Thompson 1991). However, based on a very small sample size, the Northern Territory form appears to be distinct, as it is somewhat larger, with very dark brown (almost black) fur on its back (McKean et al. 1981). This compares with the Queensland form that tends to be more uniformly brown to dark brown, and irregularly flecked with white (Compton & Johnson 1983; Hall 1995a; Troughton 1925). The EPBC Act listing follows the currently accepted taxonomy of this species and recognises one subspecies, S. s. nudicluniatus as occurring in Australia (incorporating both north-eastern Queensland and Northern Territory populations).

Appearance
The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat is a large insectivorous bat that is distinguished from other Australian sheathtail bats (Emballonuridae) by the reddish-brown to dark brown dorsal fur irregularly flecked with white, and the naked rump (Churchill 1998; Menkhorst & Knight 2001). A throat pouch is present in males and is rudimentary in females. The function of the naked rump is unknown. Northern Territory individuals may be slightly larger, darker (almost black) on the dorsal fur compared to the north-eastern Queensland specimens which have more uniformly mid to dark brown dorsal fur irregularly flecked with white (Hall 1995a; McKean et al. 1981; Troughton 1925).

Size and weight
The following table presents size and weight for North-eastern Queensland specimens (Compton & Johnson 1983; Churchill 1998):


  Weight (g) Forearm (mm) Ear (mm) Tragus (mm) Tibia (mm) Tail (mm) Head-Body (mm)
Mean 52.7 74.0 17.0 5.9 29.9 25.9 91.0
Minimum 49.0 72.3 16.0 5.2 28.6 23.0 81.2
Maximum 55.0 77.2 18.3 6.4 31.0 29.9 96.6
Sample Size 3 10 11 11 11 11 11


The following table presents size and weight for Top End, Northern Territory specimens (McKean et al. 1981; Churchill 1998):


  Weight (g) Forearm (mm) Ear (mm) Tragus (mm) Tibia (mm) Tail (mm) Head-Body (mm)
Mean 61.0 78.6 22.3 6.5 30.5 36.4 -
Minimum - 77.1 22.1 6.4 29.2 32.6 -
Maximum - 80.0 22.5 6.5 31.7 40.2 -
Sample Size 1 2 2 2 2 2 -

Sex and age variation
Poorly known due to the lack of specimens or trapped individuals.

Social structure
The social structure of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat is poorly known. The species is gregarious, with between three and 40 individuals recorded from tree hollow roosts in Australia (Churchill 1998; Compton & Johnson 1983; Murphy 2002). Outside Australia, this species has been recorded roosting in groups ranging in size from "a few individuals to a few hundred" (Bonaccorso 1998; Payne & Francis 1998).

The type locality for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat is Babinda Creek near Cardwell, North Queensland, with syntypes collected from Gowrie Creek near Cardwell (De Vis 1905). Occasional individuals have been collected from a narrow coastal region (less than 40 km inland) between Ayr and Cooktown, North Queensland, with one isolated specimen from north of Coen on Cape York Peninsula (20 specimens held in the Queensland Museum) (Coles et al. 1999; Ingram & Raven 1991). Other observations include a road-killed individual on Magnetic Island off Townsville (Queensland Museum Specimen No. JM13938); a sighting of up to 15 individuals flushed from a roost tree in the Iron Range area, Cape York, Queensland (Murphy 2002); and likely acoustic detection in an area to the west of Townsville (Balance Environmental 2012).

In the Northern Territory it was first recorded in 1979 in the Kapalga area of Kakadu National Park (McKean et al. 1981) and there have been less than five confirmed records since that time (Thomson 1991; Woinarski & Milne 2002). All of these records have been in the floodplain area of Kakadu National Park. This species may be expected to occur on the Torres Strait Islands as specimens attributed to this subspecies have been collected from the coastal plains of south-west Papua New Guinea (Waithman 1979). However, there are no confirmed records from the Torres Strait Islands, although an unconfirmed sighting was made in a sea cave on Prince of Wales Island (Coles et al. 1999). Churchill (1998) cites the location of a roost tree in the Northern Territory, however, this record was considered unsubstantiated.

There is insufficient recent data to reliably calculate current extent of occurrence or area of occupancy as:

  • There are only two records in the last two decades, both from north-eastern Queensland. One of these records was a probable road-killed individual; very unusual for a species that, based on wing morphology, is likely to primarily fly above the forest canopy or other open spaces. Such a record is anomalous and may even be the result of a vagrant individual.
  • There are no recent records from the Top End of the Northern Territory to even indicate whether the species still occurs in this region.


There is insufficient data available to indicate whether the species' distribution is severely fragmented.

The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat occurs in New Guinea, including East New Britain and Bougainville Island, Solomon Islands, Indonesia, the Malay Peninsula, Philippines, Burma, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and India (Bonaccorso 1998; Brosset 1962; Flannery 1995a; Nowak & Paradiso 1983; Payne & Francis 1998).

There is no information available on the global population's size, threats or population trends.

It is not known what percentage of the global population occurs in Australia. The percentage of the global population occurring in Australia depends on resolution of the species' taxonomy in Australia compared to elsewhere across the current species' range. Currently the distribution of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat is unclear both within Australia and in Papua New Guinea (Bonaccorso 1998; Coles et al. 1999; Schulz & Thomson 2007).

It is unclear whether the subspecies in Australia is distinct from the form(s) occurring within neighbouring Papua New Guinea. At present, there is no evidence of movements between Australia, Papua New Guinea and elsewhere within the species' distribution. A genetic study could define the likelihood of genetic interchange occurring between Australian and international subpopulations (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat has been very poorly surveyed for a number of reasons:

  • Lack of described echolocation call makes it difficult to reliably identify the species in current echolocation surveys.
  • Difficulty in trapping this species. In Australia this species has not been trapped in harp trap, mistnets or by using triplines; and it has not been located by systematic cave searches for bats (Schulz & Thomson 2007).
  • Less frequent use of shotguns as a primary technique for sampling fast-flying bats. For example, of the 20 adult specimens of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat in the Queensland Museum at least 12 had been collected using this technique (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

Consequently, it is possible this species is more widespread and common than the few recent records indicate (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

The population size of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat is poorly known. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the species occurs in low densities (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

Only two records have been made in recent times: from Magnetic Island and in the Iron Range area. Therefore, it is not known if extant populations occur in sites where this species was previously recorded prior to the early 1980s.

No interbreeding with any related species has been reported for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat in Australia or elsewhere within the species' range.

Northern Territory
All past confirmed records have been from within Kakadu National Park. However, due to the paucity of information on this species, including the current inability to target the species in surveys, there is no active management for the species, apart from protecting hollow-bearing trees from land clearance. Habitat and distribution modeling has not been conducted in the Northern Territory due to the paucity of records.

North-eastern Queensland
None of the recent or historical records have been from within reserve systems. However, it is possible/likely that populations do occur in a number of coastal reserves in this region based on BIOCLIM analysis (Schulz & Thomson 2007). In this preliminary analysis, all point locality records of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat in north-eastern Queensland were analysed using 35 biophysical parameters to predict the theoretical potential distribution of the species (Carpenter et al. 1993; Nix 1986). Note that this analysis must be regarded as very preliminary modeling due to:

  • The limited record dataset (for example, 17 point records compared to a minimum of 30–50 points used in most BIOCLIM investigations).
  • This model is based entirely on climate and does not take into account other environmental and biological parameters that may influence the actual distribution of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat, such as the presence of suitable habitat, topography, interactions with other species and disturbance regimes.

Given the limitations of the model, the predicted distribution corresponds to existing records, indicating this species to be confined to coastal areas less than 40 km inland centred on the Iron Range to the Macrossan Range area, the Cape Melville to Helenvale area, the Mossman to Gordonvale area, inland of Ingham and from Rollingstone to Ayr.

Conservation reserves supporting the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat may possibly include Bowling Green Bay National Park, Edmund Kennedy National Park, Lakefield National Park, Rokeby National Park, Jardine River National Park and likely to include the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area (Coles et al. 1999). Given the predictive modelling of Schulz and Thomson (2007) additional parks and reserves that may support populations of this species include Iron Range National Park, Cape Melville National Park, Mungkan Kandju National Park, various reserves in the Wet Tropics Management Area, Cape Pallarenda Conservation Park, lowland sections of Paluma Range National Park, Magnetic Island National Park and Townsville Common Conservation Park. Additionally, Australian Defence Force land in the Townsville area may also provide suitable habitat for this bat.

Due to the paucity of information, including the current inability to target the species in surveys, there is no active management for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat in Queensland reserve systems, apart from protecting hollow-bearing trees from land clearance in reserves.

The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat occurs mostly in lowland areas, typically in a range of woodland, forest and open environments (Schulz & Thomson 2007; Reardon et al. 2010; Dennis 2012).

The habitat adjacent to the roost in the Jerona Fauna Sanctuary at Ayr in north Queensland was in Poplar Gum (Eucalyptus platyphylla) woodland, typical of the alluvial plains adjacent to the lower Burdekin and Houghton Rivers, near Townsville (Compton & Johnson 1983). Adjacent to this habitat were woodlands dominated by Carbeen (E. tessellaris) and Ghost Gum (E. papuana). At Iron Range, Queensland, roosts were located in Darwin Stringybark woodland (E. tetrodonta) with Clarkson's Bloodwood (Corymbia clarksoniana) and Carbeen subdominant. Adjacent to the roost was a narrow strip of gallery forest along a seasonally dry watercourse and less than one kilometre away were large patches of rainforest associated with the Claudie River floodplain (Murphy 2002).  The specimen from Attack Creek, north of Coen, Queensland was collected in riverine vine forest with adjacent open forest/woodland (WildNet database, EPA, Queensland, cited in Schulz & Thomson 2007). In either case it was not known if individuals foraged over some or all of the vegetation communities in the vicinity of the roost. The Kakadu National Park specimens were collected from open Pandanus woodland fringing the sedgelands of the South Alligator River (Friend & Braithwaite 1986).

The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat has been suggested to forage over habitat edges such as the edge of rainforest and in forest clearings (Churchill 1998). There is no information is available on foraging habitat shifts between the dry and wet seasons.

The small number of confirmed roosts located in Australia have all been in tree hollows (Churchill 1998; Compton & Johnson 1983).Overseas other subspecies (perhaps distinct species to the form(s) occurring in Australia) commonly roost in caves, overhangs and man-made structures (Churchill 1998; Payne & Francis 1998). However, in Australia no individuals have been found roosting in caves. For example, a survey conducted of about 1000 coastal caves in the Wet Tropics region failed to locate this species (Clague et al. unpublished cited in Coles et al. 1999).


Roosting habitat
No studies have been conducted on the roosting ecology of this species and all located roosts are from incidental records (such as, as a result of land clearance). In Australia, all confirmed roosting records are from deep tree hollows in the Poplar Gum, Darwin Woollybutt (Eucalyptus miniata) and Darwin Stringybark (Churchill 1998; Compton & Johnson 1983; McKean et al. 1981; Murphy 2002). Hollows in these tree species have also been used as maternity roosts. Such roosts are susceptible to damage by termites and by fire (Churchill 1998; Murphy 2002). Although recorded roosting in caves overseas, a survey of approximately 1000 coastal caves in the Wet Tropics region of north-eastern Queensland failed to locate this species (Clague et al. unpub. cited in Coles et al. 1999).

Outside Australia, the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat has also been recorded roosting in human-made structures, such as the eaves of houses and in old monuments; between boulders; and in caves (Boonsong & McNeely 1977; Churchill 1998; Hall 1995a).

Foraging habitat
Only anecdotal information is available, based on habitat around roosts or from shot specimens. No information is available on foraging habitat shifts between the dry and wet seasons (Schulz & Thomson 2007). The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat has been suggested to forage over habitat edges such as the edges of rainforest and forest clearings (Churchill 1998).

Associated and sympatric species
It is likely to be associated with other bat species that require woodland with hollow-bearing trees for roosting or foraging purposes. Sympatric bat species may include the Semon's Leaf-nosed Bat (Hipposideros semoni ), Large-eared Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus philippinensis), Fawn Leaf-nosed Bat (H. cervinus), Tube-nosed Insect Bat (Murina florium) and Arnhem Leaf-nosed Bat (H. inornata), Papuan Sheathtail Bat (Saccolaimus mixtus) (Duncan et al. 1999), Northern Leaf-nosed Bat (H. stenotis) and Arnhem Sheathtail Bat (Taphozous kapalgensis).

There is no information available on the type of breeding system or breeding success in this species (Schulz & Thomson 2007). Reproduction in this species is poorly known and based on a small number of roosts incidentally located during tree-felling operations. Females lactate during the tropical wet season and one young is born but the exact periods of mating and parturition are unknown (Hall 1995a). Breeding appears to be slightly later in the Northern Territory with pregnant females recorded between January and March (Churchill 1998; McKean et al. 1981). A colony containing juveniles was recorded in April in the Northern Territory (Churchill 1998).

In Australia all breeding records have been obtained from trees that were felled during land-clearing operations. Therefore, the clearing of hollow-bearing trees in suitable habitat (although such habitat currently cannot be characterised due to the lack of systematic surveys for the species) must be considered to be a threatening process to this species.

The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat is insectivorous (Churchill 1998; Mahoney & Walton 1988), although the type of insects taken has not been documented. The species has a fast, direct flight and is likely to forage primarily for aerial insects over the woodland/forest canopy but may fly lower when foraging over open situations (Bonaccorso 1998; Churchill 1998; Woinarski & Milne 2002). In Sarawak, Churchill (1998) recorded individuals foraging in the early evening along forest edges and around a large clearing.

There is no information on temporal feeding patterns and important foraging habitat for this species (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

This species can readily be identified in the hand and distinguished from other Australian sheathtail bats (Emballonuridae) by the reddish-brown to dark brown dorsal fur irregularly flecked with white and the naked rump (Churchill 1998; Menkhorst & Knight 2001). However, the species is difficult to distinguish in the field due to the failure of conventional trapping methods and the absence of ultrasonic call identification (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

The species performs fast and highly maneuverable flight above the canopy resulting in being extremely difficult to capture (Churchill 1998) and there are currently no recognised methods to conduct targeted surveys.

The echolocation call of this bat in Australias require further definition (Balance Environmental 2012; Duncan et al. 1999; Woinarski & Milne 2002) and may have been confused in the past with other large generally high-flying bats, such as the Troughton's Sheathtail Bat (Taphozous troughtoni) and the Common Sheathtail Bat (T. georgianus) (Schulz & Thomson 2007). Echolocation calls of the White-striped Freetail Bat (Tadarida australis) in parts of north-eastern Queensland have been mistakenly attributed to this species in the past (Schulz & Thomson 2007). Elsewhere within the range of S. saccolaimus, echolocation calls have peak energy in the range 23-25 kHz, similar to the frequency band of other large sheathtail bats in Australia (Coles et al. 2004). However, due to the potential for call confusion with other large insectivorous bats (for example, sheathtail bats and some large freetail bats) and the possibility that the taxa present in Australia may be taxonomically distinct (De Vis 1905; Nowak & Paradiso 1983) caution must be applied in using echolocation calls collected from outside of Australia.

Consequently primary actions in the National Recovery Plan for this species (Schulz & Thomson 2007) are to characterise the echolocation call of this species, thereby enabling targeted surveys to be conducted:

Action 1.1
Obtain voucher echolocation calls from individuals confirmed to be the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat through the collection of calls from flying individuals, the fly-out of individuals from known roosts or released individuals that have been captured at roosts or by various trapping methods in both the north-eastern Queensland and Northern Territory 'populations'. Concentrate efforts in localities previously known to support populations of this species.

Action 1.2
Where reliable voucher calls are obtained and the echolocation call is determined to be diagnostic, review libraries of reference calls of bats collected in the north-eastern Queensland and the Top End of the Northern Territory for the presence of this species.

Note: Such an approach may result in the detection of this species from previously unknown sites that could then be targeted in subsequent surveys. Such an approach was used successfully in finding additional localities for the poorly known Arnhem Sheathtail Bat Taphozous kapalgensis (Milne et al. 2003).

Action 1.3
Conduct targeted surveys (once echolocation calls have been characterised) using a range of techniques in the wet season (when the majority of records have been obtained) concentrating sampling effort around recent localities and in areas of north-eastern Queensland identified by the BIOCLIM analyses as occurring within the predicted distribution. Also conduct targeted surveys in the Kapalga area of Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory.

Because the distribution, habitat preferences and biology of the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat are poorly known the identification of known and likely threats facing this species are incomplete.

Known past and current threats

Habitat loss
The Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat occurs primarily in tropical eucalypt woodland, and possibly rainforest in the coastal lowlands, of north-eastern Queensland and the Top End of the Northern Territory. Parts of its range have been subjected to extensive habitat clearance for agriculture (some coastal areas south of Townsville and in the Wet Tropics bioregion) and, in some areas, urban development (Cairns and Townsville areas) (Duncan et al. 1999). For example, the Jerona Fauna Sanctuary site, Ayr, Queensland (Compton & Johnson 1983) has been extensively modified by broadscale clearing for agriculture.

The small number of confirmed roosts located in Australia have all been in tree hollows. Two of these roosts, at Jerona Fauna Sanctuary and on the outskirts of Darwin in the Northern Territory, were found as a result of land clearing operations (Compton & Johnson 1983; Churchill 1998). Tree hollow availability is likely to be reduced in some areas due to land clearance, such as in the Darwin-Mary River area (Woinarski & Milne 2002).

Likely or future threats

Vegetation change
Vegetation change due to a variety of factors, such as clearing of understorey vegetation for agriculture and livestock grazing, altered fire regimes, saltwater intrusion and invasion by exotic weed species (such as Mimosa (Mimosa pigra)) may adversely affect habitat suitability (Duncan et al. 1999; Woinarski & Milne 2002). Such factors may affect recruitment, longevity and growth of roost trees and have an unknown effect on prey resources (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

Timber collection and targeted tree removal
Timber collection and the targeted removal of hollow-bearing and dead trees along road reserves, in parks (such as old trees deemed to be a potential threat to visitors due to falling branches) and other urban situations may result in the destruction of some roosts (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

Competition for hollows
In urban and some agricultural areas this species may be adversely impacted by feral birds (such as the Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)), native birds that have benefited as a result of urban/agricultural environments (for example, the Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) and the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita)) and introduced insects (for example, feral bees) through competition for tree hollows as roosting and breeding resources (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

Disease
Diseases such as Australian Bat Lyssavirus (ABLV) have not been recorded for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat, but this may be a function of the lack of specimens presented for examination. In the related Yellow-bellied Sheathtail Bat (Saccolaimus flaviventris), five of seven individuals (71.4%) examined in Queensland were found to be ABLV-positive (Barrett 2004).

The impact of diseases on the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat is unknown. Where there are adverse changes in population structure or dynamics, such as through food shortages, the prevalence of disease may alter and result in a threat to populations of this species (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

Climate change
The loss of climatic habitat such as tropical forests caused by anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases has been identified as a key threatening process under the EPBC Act (DEH 2006q). The narrow bioclimatic habitat range occupied by the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat potentially makes it susceptible to climate change (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

Due to the lack of information on the species there are currently no specific actions being undertaken in north-eastern Queensland or the Northern Territory to abate known or likely threats. However, indirectly the species is likely to be benefit from habitat protection within current and future reserve systems within these regions and through reductions in broad-scale land clearance activities where extensive stands of hollow-bearing trees are cleared (Schulz & Thomson 2007).

The following recovery objectives were identified in the National Recovery Plan for the species (Schulz & Thomson 2007):

  • Develop more effective detection techniques (including obtaining echolocation reference calls) and undertake systematic surveys to enable a more comprehensive assessment of distribution, population size, status and habitat preferences.
  • Increase protection of known roosts both on and outside reserved lands.
  • Better determine roosting requirements and document foraging requirements of the species, including potential seasonal and distributional differences and the identification of threatening processes.
  • Establish monitoring sites to investigate population trends in the species.
  • Clarify the taxonomic status of the species.

Prior to the recovery plan for the species by Schulz and Thomson (2007), Coles and colleagues (1999) identified the following recovery objectives:

  • Clarify the current distribution and abundance of the species. In particular, determine if this species is still extant in Australia. Increase understanding of the basic ecology of the species to determine: habitat requirements; roost and maternity site selection; and threatening processes.
  • Protect any habitats and roost sites where the species is found to occur.
  • Assess whether there is a taxonomic distinction between Northern Territory and Queensland populations, and determine relationships to extralimital populations.

No major studies on the taxonomy, ecology or conservation biology of this species have been undertaken in Australia or extralimitally. Scientific papers published on this species in Australia have related to reporting the accidental location of roosts, including Compton and Johnson (1983), McKean and colleagues (1981), and Murphy (2002).

Other available management documents on this species include Coles and colleagues (1999) and Woinarski and Milne (2002).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Biological Resource Use:Logging and Wood Harvesting:Habitat loss, modification and degradation due to timber harvesting Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate change altering atmosphere/hydrosphere temperatures, rainfall patterns and/or frequency of severe weather events Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat modification, destruction and alteration due to changes in land use patterns Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation Acridotheres tristis (Common Myna, Indian Myna) Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition and/or predation by birds Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Recovery plan for the Bare-rumped Sheathtail Bat Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus 2007-2011 (Schulz, M. & B. Thomson, 2007) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Listing Advice on ten species of Bats (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2001a) [Listing Advice].

Balance Environmental (2012). Microbat Call Identifiaction Report. Attachment F - Townsville Ring Road Section 4. Prepared for AECOM.

Barrett, J.L. (2004). Australian Bat Lyssavirus. PhD Thesis. Ph.D. Thesis. Queensland: School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland.

Bonaccorso, F.J. (1998). Bats of Papua New Guinea. Conservation International Tropical Field Guide Series 2. Washington D C: Conservation International.

Boonsong, L. & J.A. McNeely (1977). Mammals of Thailand. Bangkok, Thailand: Sahakarnbhat.

Brosset, A. (1962). The bats of Central and Western India. Part 1. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society. 59:1-57.

Carpenter, G., A. N. Gillison & J. Winter (1993). DOMAIN: a flexible modelling procedure for mapping potential distributions of plants and animals. Biodiversity and Conservation. 2:667-680.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Saccolaimus saccolaimus nudicluniatus in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 24 Jul 2014 05:05:19 +1000.