Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered as Acacia aprica
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Blunt wattle (Acacia aprica) Interim Recovery Plan 2003-2008 (Bayliss, B., 2003) [Recovery Plan] as Acacia aprica.
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia aprica.
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (11/04/2007) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2007f) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia aprica.
 
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Critically Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013) as Acacia aprica
Scientific name Acacia aprica [64821]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Maslin & A.R.Chapman
Infraspecies author  
Reference Nuytsia 12(3): 471 (1999).
Other names Acacia aprica Chapman & Maslin ms. [67429]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

The Blunt Wattle is an open shrub 0.3 m (Paczkowska & Chapman 2000) growing to 1.5-2 m tall (Brown et al. 1998; Maslin & Chapman 1999; Stack & English 1999; Orchard & Wilson 2001a).

This species is confined to the Coorow-Carnamah area, about 250 km north of Perth in south-western WA, and has a known range of about 10 km (Brown et al. 1998). The species is known from six natural populations, five of them on narrow degraded road reserves (Monks & Coates 2002). Four of the populations are very small, consisting of 15 or fewer plants whilst the largest population contains 106 plants (Buist et al. 2002). The number of plants remaining in the wild has been estimated at around 150 plants (Stack & English 1999) and more recently around 220 (Monks & Coates 2002).

The species does not occur naturally in a conservation reserve (Briggs & Leigh 1996). However, since 1999, seedlings have been planted and established successfully in a disused gravel pit in a Shire Reserve near Carnamah (Monks & Coates 2002).

Population details as in Stack & English (1999):

Population [as
numbered by
WA CALM]
LocationLand StatusYear of survey/
number of plants
Condition
1SE of CarnamahMain Roads WA Road ReserveJuly 1996 - 102
Apr. 1998 - 107
July 1998 - 139
Moderate
2SE of CarnamahMain Roads WA Road ReserveJuly 1996 - 2
Apr. 1998 - 2
Poor
3SE of CarnamahShire Road ReserveJuly 1996 - 5
Apr. 1998 - 7
July 1998 - 8
Very poor
4SE of CarnamahShire Road ReserveJuly 1996 - 1
Apr. 1998 - 1
July 1998 - 1
Poor
5SE of CarnamahShire Road ReserveJuly 1996 - 2
Apr. 1998 - 3
July 1998 - 3
Very poor
6SE of CarnamahPrivate propertyJuly 1998 - 1Poor condition

The species has been confused with Acacia merinthophora which it resembles in habit (Stack & English 1999).

The species grows on plains and rocky hills. Soils are red/brown gravelly or clayey sand (Brown et al. 1998; Paczkowska & Chapman 2000) and often contain surface quartz (Stack & English 1999).

The vegetation is heath and low woodland (Brown et al. 1998; Maslin & Chapman 1999; Orchard & Wilson 2001a). Associated species include Allocasuarina campestris, Acacia acuminata, Grevillea paniculata and Hakea scoparia (Stack & English 1999).

Five of the populations are in highly disturbed linear road reserves but the sixth and largest is in relatively undisturbed scrub heath in a small remnant of native vegetation (Buist et al. 2002).

The golden inflorescences (flower heads) are globular to oblong and are borne June to Aug. (Brown et al. 1998; Maslin & Chapman 1999; Stack & English 1999). Mature pods are found mid-Dec. (Maslin & Chapman 1999).

The species appears to be a disturbance opportunist (Stack & English 1999), often occupying tracks and fire breaks. Studies indicate that seeds are patchily distributed in the soil and that germinations is increased by scarification or exposure to heat. It has been demonstrated that experimental fires can break seed dormancy and promote germination (Buist et al. 2002).

Size class structure, levels of canopy death and an absence of juveniles indicate that all populations are in decline. All populations were capable of producing viable seed but seed production varied considerably between years and populations (Buist et al. 2002).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Mechanical disturbance during construction, maintanance or recreational activities Leionema obtusifolium in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006abe) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Leionema obtusifolium in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006abe) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi Threat abatement plan for disease in natural ecosystems caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2009w) [Threat Abatement Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Habitat degradation caused by firebreak construction and/or maintenance Blunt Wattle (Acacia aprica) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Stack, G . & V. English, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Blunt Wattle (Acacia aprica) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Stack, G . & V. English, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].
Pollution:Airborne Agricultural pollutants:Fertiliser drift Leionema obtusifolium in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006abe) [Internet].
Pollution:Airborne Agricultural pollutants:Herbicide drift Leionema obtusifolium in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006abe) [Internet].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Leionema obtusifolium in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006abe) [Internet].

Briggs, J.D. & J.H. Leigh (1996). Rare or Threatened Australian Plants - Revised Edition. Collingwood: CSIRO Publishing.

Brown, A., C. Thomson-Dans & N. Marchant, eds. (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Como, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Buist, M.L., D.J. Coates & C.J. Yates (2002). Rarity and threat in relation to the conservation of Acacia in Western Australia. Kathryn Lee, ed. Conservation Science Western Australia. 4 (3):36-51. Dept of Conservation and Land Management, WA.

Coates, D.J. (1999). Acacia species (6) Interim Recovery Plans (Implementation). WA CALM.

Maslin, B.R. & A.R. Chapman (1999). Acacia miscellany 19. The taxonomy of some Western Australian species of Acacia section Juliflorae with 4-merous flowers (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae). Nuytsia. 12(3):469-486.

Monks, L. & Coates, D. (2002). The translocation of two critically endangered Acacia species. Kathryn Lee, ed. Conservation Science Western Australia. 4 (3):54-61.

Orchard, A.E. & A.J.G. Wilson, eds. (2001a). Flora of Australia, Volume 11B, Mimosaceae, Acacia Part 2. In: Flora of Australia. Canberra, ACT: ABRS & CSIRO.

Paczkowska, G. & A.R. Chapman (2000). The Western Australian Flora, A Descriptive Catalogue. The Wildflower Society of Western Australia (Inc.), the Western Australian Herbarium, Department of Conservation and Land Management and the Botanic Gardens & Parks Authority.

Stack, G . & V. English (1999). Blunt Wattle (Acacia aprica) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002. Natural Heritage Trust/ CALM. Waneroo, WA; CALM.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia aprica in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 17 Apr 2014 11:54:11 +1000.