Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered as Acacia whibleyana
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice for Acacia whibleyana (Whibley Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2013ff) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia whibleyana.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
SA:Draft recovery plan for 23 threatened flora taxa on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia 2007-2012 (Pobke, K., 2007) [State Recovery Plan].
State Listing Status
SA: Listed as Endangered (National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (South Australia): June 2011 list) as Acacia whibleyana
Scientific name Acacia whibleyana [64497]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author R.S.Cowan & Maslin
Infraspecies author  
Reference Nuytsia 10: 228 (1995).
Other names Acacia whibleyana Cowan & Maslin ms. [67393]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

The Whibley Wattle is a dense shrub growing to 2.5 m high and spreading to 4 m in diameter (Whibley & Symon 1992; Cowan & Maslin 1995; Orchard & Wilson 2001a) with globular golden flower heads (Whibley & Symon 1992; Orchard & Wilson 2001a).

This species is restricted to near-coastal areas near Tumby Bay on the Eyre Peninsula, SA (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998; Orchard & Wilson 2001a). The two known locations are 12-15 km apart (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998) and the species has been collected within a 40 km range of Tumby Bay (Whibley & Symon 1992). There is also an isolated herbarium record from 28 km S of Whyalla, on Eyre Peninsula, however, the locality details are unclear and a search did not reveal the species (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

The species was originally known from as few as 44 plants in several populations, growing on roadsides largely cleared of native vegetation, and overrun by agricultural grasses and weeds. These populations were surrounded by cleared, arable farming land. More extensive survey work revealed 322 plants in two disjunct localities - Salt Lake site and Quarry site. The species' area of occupancy is 0.25 km² (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

The Salt Lake population, about 10 km SW of Tumby Bay, contains 85 plants including 36 young plants. The population is located on a 0.75 ha triangle of council owned land at a road intersection (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

The Quarry population is located about 8 km NW of Tumby Bay, in a disused roadside quarry. The population is restricted to 250 ha, approximately 1 x 2 km in dimension, in the Koppio Hills overlooking Tumby Bay. The higher altitude supports markedly different vegetation to that on the coastal plain. This area supports a total population of 215 plants: 130 plants were found within and immediately adjacent to the quarry, 25 plants occur on adjacent roadsides and 60 on adjacent grazed farmland (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

The Salt Lake populations were enhanced through trial translocation planting. In 1996 and 1997, 254 plants were translocated, 46% of which were surviving at the end of 1997. Seed translocation contributed a further 39 seedlings to this population (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

This species grows on limestone and loam, sometimes near salt swamps (Whibley & Symon 1992; Cowan & Maslin 1995; Orchard & Wilson 2001a). Average annual rainfall is 350-400 mm (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

The Salt Lake site is on coastal plains at 10 m asl, on sandy to clayey loam of pH 6.6-6.7. The vegetation is tall shrubland or heath dominated by Pittosporum phylliraeoides and Melaleuca acuminata. Smaller shrubs include Enchylaena tomentosa, Lasiopetalum baueri, Tetragonia implexicoma and Acacia spinescens (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

The Quarry site is located in hills at 150 m asl, on a gravelly soil of pH 6.6. The vegetation is low open woodland with Pittosporum phylliraeoides, Eucalyptus flocktoniae, E. pileata, E. dumosa, A. cupularis and A. rupicola (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

Flowers are borne Aug.-Oct. (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998). Flowering commences in early Aug., full bloom is reached by early to mid Sept. Fruits mature Dec.-Jan. (Whibley & Symon 1992; Cowan & Maslin 1995; Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998).

Flowering and seed production is quite variable. The soil seedbank is poor, possibly due to seed predation (Jusaitis & O'Connor 1999). The seeds are dispersed by ants attracted by the fatty aril (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1998; Jusaitis & O'Connor 1999).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Energy Production and Mining:Mining and Quarrying:Habitat destruction, disturbance and/or modification due to mining activities Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oxalis pes-caprae (Soursob, Bermuda Buttercup, Buttercup Oxalis, Cape Cowslip, Geelsuring, Oxalis, Sorrel, Sourgrass, Yellow-Flowered Oxalis, Yellow Sorrel) Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Lycium ferocissimum (African Boxthorn, Boxthorn) Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Avena fatua (Wild Oats) Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Asparagus asparagoides (Bridal Creeper, Bridal Veil Creeper, Smilax, Florist's Smilax, Smilax Asparagus) Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi Threat abatement plan for disease in natural ecosystems caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2009w) [Threat Abatement Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Transportation and Service Corridors:Road and rail maintenance works Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ae) [Internet].

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia whibleyana in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 29 Aug 2014 21:59:19 +1000.