Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Recovery Plan for Corangamite Water Skink Eulamprus tympanum marnieae (Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment (Vic. DSE), 2011f) [Recovery Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened reptiles. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.6 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011m) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
VIC:Flora and Fauna Guarantee Action Statement 142 - Corangamite Water Skink Eulamprus tympanum marnieae (Robertson, P., G. Peterson & K. Lowe, 2003) [State Action Plan].
State Listing Status
VIC: Listed as Threatened (Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Victoria): February 2014 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Endangered (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
VIC: Listed as Critically Endangered (Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria: 2013 list)
Scientific name Eulamprus tympanum marnieae [64487]
Family Scincidae:Squamata:Reptilia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author (Lvnnberg and Andersson,1913)
Infraspecies author Hutchinson and Rawlinson, 1995
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.museum.vic.gov.au/bioinformatics/lizards/images/tymplive1.htm

An olive-brown reptile growing to 80mm with head variegated with black and scattered black scales on the back, a broad, dark upper side zone from below the eye to the base of the tail, scattered small white/cream spots, whitish lower flanks with scattered black scales, white belly, limbs variegated with black and throat spotted with black (Cogger 2000).

Confined to the Dreeite region of south-western Vic., near Lakes Bolac, Colac and Corangamite (Cogger et al. 1993; Hutchinson & Rawlinson 1995).

The distribution has contracted, with at least two known populations (those at Lismore and on the north-eastern shore of Lake Bolac) now extinct. The current distribution includes 29 sites, probably representing at least 11 different populations. Pure E. t. marnieae populations occur in the Dreeite, Red Rock, Wool Wool, Nalangil, Lake Colac, Derrinallum, Vite Vite, Dundonnell, Nerrin Nerrin and Lake Bolac regions. Populations where the subspecies intergrades with E. t. tympanum occur in the Lake Corangamite, Lake Weeranganuk, Lake Koreetnang, Lake Colongulac, Darlington, Pura Pura and Vite Vite North regions (Robertson 2000).

First described as a subspecies by Hutchinson & Rawlinson (1995).

Found in grassy open woodland and cleared pastures dotted with ephemeral swamps and lakes, on rocky basaltic soils (Cogger et al. 1993). Within these areas, the lizards inhabit rocky mounds or "stony rises", sheltering in rock crevices and man-made drystone walls (Cogger et al. 1993; Hutchinson & Rawlinson 1995). Deep rock crevices may provide moist cover during the dry summer (Hutchinson & Rawlinson 1995).

The preferred habitat is a geographically peculiar landform comprising basalt ridges and boulder heaps resulting from the collapse of lava tunnels (Robertson 2000). Skinks occur at localities with high shrub density (often Hymenanthera dentata), high cover of Stinging Nettle (Urtica incisa), short distances to vegetation cover, large rock aggregations, rock fissures, and permanent freshwater bodies (Peterson 1997; Robertson 2000).

Like its relatives this skink is diurnal (active by day), often seen perching on a rockpile or fence. Unlike other water skinks this subspecies is extremely shy, fleeing to cover even when a human observer is tens of metres distant, and seldom comes into open view while being watched (Hutchinson & Rawlinson 1995).

There is little information available on diet, though insects are most likely the major prey item (Robertson 2000). The subspecies has been observed to consume the fruit of the Tree Violet (Hymenanthera dentata), which may be an important dietary component during some periods (Peterson 1997).

Reproduction is limited to a single litter born in Dec. to Jan. of 1 to 6 young (Robertson 2000), with a mean litter size (oviducal eggs) of 4.3 (Hutchinson & Rawlinson 1995). Litter size and mass increases with female body size (Robertson 2000). Ovulation occurs in late Oct.-early Nov. Probably viviparous as in the nominate subspecies, with birth probably occurring in Jan. (Hutchinson & Rawlinson 1995).

Males with enlarged testes have been collected in Apr. and Sept., with testes regressing in Oct.-Nov. and completely regressed in Jan. (Hutchinson & Rawlinson 1995).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Fertiliser application Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation The Action Plan for Australian Reptiles (Cogger, H.G., E.E. Cameron, R.A. Sadlier & P. Eggler, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Biological Resource Use:Gathering natural materials:Removal of bush rocks Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Vulpes vulpes (Red Fox, Fox) Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, competition and/or habitat degradation Mus musculus (House Mouse) Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Alteration of hydrological regimes and water quality Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Pollution:Agricultural Effluents:Habitat degradation due to agricultural chemical pollution Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses (suggest Reproductive Resilience?):Indirect Species Effects:Reduction of genetic intergrity of a species due to hybridisation Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003 (Robertson, P., 2000) [State Recovery Plan].

Cogger, H.G. (2000). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia - 6th edition. Sydney, NSW: Reed New Holland.

Cogger, H.G., E.E. Cameron, R.A. Sadlier & P. Eggler (1993). The Action Plan for Australian Reptiles. [Online]. Canberra, ACT: Australian Nature Conservation Agency. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/action/reptiles/index.html.

Hutchinson, M. N. & P.A. Rawlinson (1995). The water skinks (Lacertilia: Eulamprus) of Victoria and South Australia. Records of the South Australia Museum. 28 (2):185-207.

Peterson, G. (1997). Ecology, evolution and conservation of the Eulamprus quoyii complex in central southwestern Victoria. Hons. Thesis. LaTrobe University. LaTrobe University, Bundoora.

Peterson, G. (2000). Corangamite Water Skink (Dreeite) Recovery Plan Research Phase. LaTrobe University.

Robertson, P. (2000). Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae). 1998-2003. [Online]. Environment Australia. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/c-water-skink/index.html.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Eulamprus tympanum marnieae in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Tue, 2 Sep 2014 20:49:41 +1000.