Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eucalyptus langleyi (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ol) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Albatross Mallee - profile (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2005du) [Internet].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Vulnerable (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): August 2014 list)
Scientific name Eucalyptus langleyi [56224]
Family Myrtaceae:Myrtales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author L.A.S.Johnson & Blaxell
Infraspecies author  
Reference Telopea 4(2) (1991) 259.
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Eucalyptus langleyi

Common name: Albatross Mallee

Other names: Green Mallee Ash, Nowra Mallee, Nowra Mallee Ash

Conventionally accepted as Eucalyptus langleyi (CHAH 2010).

The Albatross Mallee is a eucalypt species growing 5–6 m in height with multiple stems (mallee). The bark is smooth, and variable in colour from brown to grey, green or pink, and shed in long ribbons (Harden 1991; Hill & Johnson 1991; Plantnet 2012).

Juvenile leaves are broadly oval-shaped and glossy green in colour. Adult leaves are large, lance-shaped, approximately 18 cm long by 4 cm wide, also glossy-green, and alternate along stems. Adult leaves have obscure veins but prominently thickened margins (Plantnet 2012).

Flower buds are club-shaped, have a hemispherical cap and look minutely warty. Cream flowers in clusters of 7 are borne on a flattened stalk (peduncle) 8–12 mm long and up to 7 mm wide. Each individual flower stalk (pedicel) is 0–2 mm long and angular (flattened). The fruits are hemispherical or urn-shaped, with 3 or 4 chambers, ribbed with enclosed valves, 8–10 mm long and in diameter, sometimes with 1–3 vertical ridges and tips often exserted (protruding). Seeds are dull, grey-brown, kidney shaped but angular, to 2.5 mm long (Plantnet 2012).

The Albatross Mallee occurs inland west and south-west of Nowra on the south coast of NSW (Brooker & Kleinig 1999; Hill & Johnson 1991). The main occurrence of the Albatross Mallee is to the south-west of Nowra as far as Yarramunmun Creek and on rocky outcrops near the Tomerong-Yerriyong area with a small, isolated stand found north of the Shoalhaven River near Nowra (NSW DECCW 2005du; NSW OEH 2012c).

There is no published data to estimate the species to estimate the species' area of occurrence, however, an unsourced publication suggests that the species occurs in an area of approximately 12 x 4 km (NRMS 2011).

There is no published data on the total population, however, an unsourced publication suggests that the Albatross Mallee has an estimated total population of 2300 plants over approximately 25 sites, several of which contain several hundred plants each (NRMS 2011).

The Endangered Population in the Shoalhaven Local Government Area listed under the TSC Act consisted of 20 plants in a 2008 (down from 32 in 1998) and occurred as a series of fragmented stands across approximately 1.3 km² on land owned by Shoalhaven City Council and in Bomaderry Creek Regional Park (NSW SC 2010). The Endangered Population is approximately 5 km from the nearest population of the Albatross Mallee to the south-west, across the Shoalhaven River (NSW SC 2010).

Populations of the Albatross Mallee are known to occur in the Parma Creek Nature Reserve (at the eastern end of the Nowra-Braidwood Road (Main Road No. 92)) (NRMS 2011), land owned by Shoalhaven City Council (NSW SC 2010) and in Bomaderry Creek Regional Park (NSW SC 2010).

The main occurrences of the Albatross Mallee are on shallow, poorly drained sandy soils over sandstone or associated with laterite (Brooker & Kleinig 1999; Hill & Johnson 1991). It occurs on plateaux in highly dissected areas, often in heath patches surrounded by woodland of Red Bloodwood (Corymbia gummifera), Yertchuk (Eucalyptus consideniana) and a 'Scribbly Gum', probably E. racemosa (Brooker 2001 pers. comm; Hill & Johnson 1991).

The isolated northern population occurs on skeletal soils on rocky sloping Nowra Sandstone outcrops along Bomaderry Creek, in woodland dominated by Grey Gum (E. punctata), but sometimes with Spotted Gum (C. maculata) present. The woodland habitat has a shrubby midstorey comprising species such as Sweet Pittosporum (Pittosporum undulatum), Tick Bush (Kunzea ambigua), Bracelet Honey-myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris), Black Sheaok (Allocasuarina littoralis), Tea-tree (Leptospermum spp.) and Sandpaper Fig (Ficus coronata) (NSW OEH 2012c; NSW SC 2010).

The northern population occurs at an altitude of 30–40 m above sea level (asl) whilst the southern populations occur at between 130–255 m asl (NSW OEH 2012c).

The Albatross Mallee is recorded to flower between May and June (Brooker & Kleinig 1999), with insects the suggested pollinators (Briggs 2009 pers. comm. cited in NSW OEH 2012c). Pollination of plants is limited spatially (NSW SC 2010), with an estimate of pollen movements for eucalypts of less than 1 km, with rare events of greater than 5 km (Potts et al. 2003, cited in NSW OEH 2012c). Seed dispersal is also over limited distances, with estimates of less than twice a tree's height, though distances of up to 310 m may occur in favourable conditions. Therefore isolated populations of this species may have gene combinations that are not present in other populations (NSW SC 2010). Vigorous regrowth has been observed from plants that have been burnt only occasionally, however regrowth becomes weak on frequently burnt plants and no seedling regrowth has been observed within the isolated northern population (NSW OEH 2012c).

The Albatross Mallee may be mistaken for the Yellow-top Mallee Ash (E. luehmanniana), which has its southern most extent in Bulli approximately 90 km north of Nowra. The Yellow-top Mallee Ash has duller, grey juvenile leaves and coarser buds and fruit (Brooker & Kleinig 1996). It can also be mistaken for the Faulconbridge Mallee Ash (E. burgessiana) found in the Blue Mountains area, which does not have flattened stems and has narrower adult leaves (2.5 cm wide), smaller buds (7–10 mm long and 3–4 mm wide) and lacks the distinctly winged shoots of the Albatross Mallee (Brooker & Kleinig 1999; NSW DECCW 2005du; Plantnet 2012).

The main identified threats to Albatross Mallee are (Hill & Johnson 1991; NSW OEH 2012c):

  • residential and recreational development and related infrastructure such as road, power, trail and pipeline construction/maintenance
  • illegal rubbish dumping
  • weed invasion suppressing seedling establishment
  • trampling of seedlings and damage to new growth from stems and lignotubers by recreational users of the area in which the population occurs.

The main potential threats to Albatross Mallee include (Hill & Johnson 1991; NSW OEH 2012c):

  • habitat loss through clearing, with some individuals likely to be lost if the central route of the proposed Bomaderry Link Road is approved
  • inappropriate fire regimes with frequent fire events combined with drought conditions responsible for the death of several individuals over the past 20 years
  • stochastic events such as fire and drought due to the small population size and restricted distribution.

Management documents relevant to the Albatross Mallee are at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Mechanical disturbance during construction, maintanance or recreational activities Eucalyptus langleyi in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006iw) [Internet].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Recreational Activities:Disturbance, especially from human recreational activities and development Eucalyptus langleyi in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006iw) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eucalyptus langleyi (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ol) [Conservation Advice].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Eucalyptus langleyi in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006iw) [Internet].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eucalyptus langleyi (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ol) [Conservation Advice].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Utility and Service Lines:Habitat modification due to construction and maintenance of gas pipeline easement Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eucalyptus langleyi (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ol) [Conservation Advice].

Brooker, M.I.H. (2001). Personal Communication.

Brooker, M.I.H. & D.A. Kleinig (1996). Eucalyptus. An illustrated guide to identification. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Reed New Holland.

Brooker, M.I.H. & D.A. Kleinig (1999). Field Guide to Eucalypts. Volume 1, South-eastern Australia. Hawthorn, Victoria: Bloomings Books.

Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) (2010). Australian Plant Census. [Online]. Australian National Herbarium, Australian National Botanic Gardens and Australian Biological Resources Study . Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/chah/apc/.

Harden, G.J. (ed.) (1991). Flora of New South Wales, Volume Two. Kensington, NSW: University of NSW Press.

Hill, K.D. & L.A.S. Johnson (1991). Systematic studies in the eucalypts - 3. New taxa in Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae). Telopea. 4(2):223-267.

New South Wales Office of the Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH) (2012c). Eucalyptus langleyi L.A.S. Johnson & Blaxell north of the Shoalhaven River in the Shoalhaven local government area Endangered Population profile. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedspecies/.

New South Wales Scientific Committee (NSW SC) (2010). Eucalyptus langleyi L.A.S. Johnson & Blaxell population north of the Shoalhaven River in the Shoalhaven local government area - endangered population listing- final determination. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/determinations/eucalyptuslangleyiF.htm.

NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW) (2005du). Albatross Mallee - profile. [Online]. Available from: http://www.threatenedspecies.environment.nsw.gov.au/tsprofile/profile.aspx?id=10298.

NSW Roads and Maritime Services (NRMS) (2011). Main Road 92: Project Documents. [Online]. NSW Roads and Maritime Services. Available from: http://www.rta.nsw.gov.au/roadprojects/projects/south_eastern_region/mr92/project_documents/index.html.

PlantNET (2012). The Plant Information Network System. [Online]. Sydney, Australia: The Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust. Available from: http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008ol). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Eucalyptus langleyi. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/56224-conservation-advice.pdf.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Eucalyptus langleyi in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 2 Oct 2014 09:27:38 +1000.