Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia brachypoda (Western Wheatbelt Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008agh) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Threatened flora of the Western Central Wheatbelt (Collins, J., 2009) [State Species Management Plan].
WA:Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Narrogin District (Durell, G.S. & R.M. Buehrig, 2001) [State Species Management Plan].
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Vulnerable (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013)
Scientific name Acacia brachypoda [55594]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Maslin
Infraspecies author  
Reference Nuytsia 7(2): (1990).
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Acacia brachypoda

Common name: Western Wheatbelt Wattle

Other names: Chinocup Wattle

Conventionally accepted as Acacia brachypoda (CHAH 2010).

The Western Wheatbelt Wattle is a dense, rounded, slightly aromatic shrub growing between 1–3 m in height and 1–4 m in width (Maslin 2001b). The leaves are hairless green phyllodes (flattened leaf stalks that resemble leaves) that are held erect and straight or slightly incurved. When viewed in cross-section, phyllodes are circular with four nerves evident, or flattened with one nerve, 2–5 cm long by 1 mm wide. Flowers are golden in colour and arranged in globular heads, two per leaf axil, each flower head on a stalk about 2–3 mm long. Seed pods are hairless, curved or coiled and 7–8 mm wide. Seeds are 4 mm long with a thick yellow-brown seed stalk (aril) (Brown et al. 1998; Maslin 1990a, 2001b).

The Western Wheatbelt Wattle occurs east of Perth, south-west Western Australia, from near the headwaters of the Darkin River, east to near Mt Kokeby Siding (between Beverley and Brookton) (Brown et al. 1998; Durell & Buehrig 2001; Maslin 1990a, 2001b).

The Western Wheatbelt Wattle is known from six populations in two main areas (Brown et al. 1998) with approximately 5000 recorded individuals in total (WA CALM 2008).

One population is recorded from Wandoo National Park. All other known populations occur in roadside and railway reserve remnants (WA CALM 2008).

The Western Wheatbelt Wattle grows in low-lying, winter-wet swamps in sandy loam or sandy clay soils in open scrub or on low sandy loam rises in open Wandoo (Eucalyptus wandoo) woodland with a dense understorey, adjacent to slightly saline flats. The species is associated with Wandoo, or, in open areas, with Allocasuarina sp., Lesser Bottlebrush (Callistemon phoneciceus), Variable-leaved Hakea (Hakea varia), Leptospermum sp. and Melaleuca sp. (Brown et al. 1998; Durell & Beuhrig 2001; Maslin 1990a, 2001; Paczkowska & Chapman 2000).

The Western Wheatbelt Wattle is described as a highly fecund (fertile) species (Maslin 1990a). Flowers and mature fruit are present from May to July (Brown et al. 1998; Maslin 2001b; Paczkowska & Chapman 2000). Records show that flowering commences late May near Brookton, but about a month later at Darkin Swamp (Maslin 1990a).

The Western Wheatbelt Wattle is distinguished from other members of the Acacia wilhelmiana group by its very short peduncles (flower stalk) and few-flowered heads (Maslin 1990a).

The main identified threats to Western Wheatbelt Wattle include the risk of rising salinity and water-logging (Brown et al. 1998; Durell & Beuhrig 2001) due to the species preference for low lying, potentially salt-prone localities (TSSC 2008agh).

The main potential threats to Western Wheatbelt Wattle include its susceptibility to extinction via stochastic events (chance events), due to the small number of individuals and limited geographic distribution. Other potential threats to the species include infrastructure or development activities, weeds, fire and improper land use (TSSC 2008agh).

Commonwealth Conservation Advice

Refer to the Commonwealth Conservation Advice (TSSC 2008agh) for information on research priorities and recovery priority actions to mitigate threats including habitat loss, disturbance, modification and weeds. Raising awareness of the species and enabling recovery of additional populations are also encouraged in the Advice.

Management documents for the Western Wheatbelt Wattle can be found at the start of this profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia brachypoda (Western Wheatbelt Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008agh) [Conservation Advice].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human induced disturbance due to unspecified activities Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia brachypoda (Western Wheatbelt Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008agh) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia brachypoda (Western Wheatbelt Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008agh) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Salinity Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia brachypoda (Western Wheatbelt Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008agh) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Other Ecosystem Modifications:Changes in hydrology leading to rising water tables and dryland salinity Acacia brachypoda in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006z) [Internet].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia brachypoda (Western Wheatbelt Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008agh) [Conservation Advice].

Brown, A., C. Thomson-Dans & N. Marchant, eds. (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Como, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) (2010). Australian Plant Census. [Online]. Australian National Herbarium, Australian National Botanic Gardens and Australian Biological Resources Study . Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/chah/apc/.

Durell, G.S. & R.M. Buehrig (2001). Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Narrogin District. [Online]. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/plants-and-animals/threatened-species-and-communities/threatened-plants.

Maslin, B.R. (1990a). Acacia Miscellany 4. Three new Western Australian species with affinities to A. wilhemiana (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae: Section Plurinerves) from Western Australia). Nuytsia. 7(2):221-228.

Maslin, B.R. (2001b). Mimosaceae. Acacia part 2. In: Orchard, A.E. & A. Wilson, eds. Flora of Australia. 11B:1-536. Melbourne, Victoria: Australian Biological Resources Study and CSIRO Publishing.

Paczkowska, G. & A.R. Chapman (2000). The Western Australian Flora, A Descriptive Catalogue. The Wildflower Society of Western Australia (Inc.), the Western Australian Herbarium, Department of Conservation and Land Management and the Botanic Gardens & Parks Authority.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2008agh). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia brachypoda (Western Wheatbelt Wattle). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/55594-conservation-advice.pdf.

Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management (WA CALM) (2008). Records held in CALM's Declared Rare Flora Database and rare flora files. Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia brachypoda in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 24 Apr 2014 23:51:18 +1000.