Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered as Kennedia lateritia
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Kennedia macrophylla (Augusta Kennedia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ej) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Kennedia macrophylla.
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (87) (23/09/2009) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2009i) [Legislative Instrument] as Kennedia lateritia.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Central Forest Region. Part 2 (Williams, K., A. Horan, S. Wood & A. Webb, 2001) [State Species Management Plan].
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list) as Kennedia lateritia
Scientific name Kennedia lateritia [45985]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author F.Muell.
Infraspecies author  
Reference Mueller, F.J.H. von (1864) Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae 4:78
Other names Kennedia macrophylla [19904]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Kennedia lateritia

Common name: Augusta Kennedia

Conventionally accepted as Kennedia lateritia F.Muell. (CHAH 2010). Previously known as Kennedia macrophylla.

The Augusta Kennedia is described as a "woody twiner", usually growing over low vegetation forming a "creeping cover" of 2 to 4 metres across, but the species can climb up trees to approximately 4 metres (Brown et al. 1998; Rye 1982). The species can be a vigorous climber with long twisted trailing stems (Leigh et al. 1984). Young stems have spreading hairs while older stems are woody. The leaves are made up of three broad glossy leaflets, each up to 7 cm long. The leaf stalks are about 4 cm long and have two leaf-like, very broad stipules at their base which are often joined to one another. Its flowers are 1.5+ cm in length and red with a yellow patch at the base of the largest petal. The individual flowers, each on stalks about 8 mm long, are in scattered groups of three along a common stalk which often is greater then 20 cm in length (Williams et al. 2001).

Confined to coastal dunes on the south coast of Western Australia (Leigh et al. 1984), in the Augusta-Cape Leeuwin area (Brown et al. 1998).

The species' geographical range is less than 5 km (Williams et al. 2001).

The Augusta Kennedia is an established cultivar in the ornamental plant industry in Western Australia and some other states. It is readily grown from seed provided the seeds are scarified before being sown but does not grow well from cuttings. Commercial supplies of seed and nursery plants are obtained from cultivated stocks rather than wild plants of the species (Williams et al. 2001).

Known from four populations near Augusta, with a total population of 100+ plants (Williams et al. 2001):


Population No. of Plants Land Status
East of Leeuwin Road 12 Reserve
Albany/Deere Street 13 Private Property
South west Augusta 15 Private Property
South west Augusta Unknown Unknown

The population trend for the species may be in decline. Williams and colleagues (2001) provide a total population figure of 100+ individuals in four populations with low numbers in each population. Rye (1982) identified only three populations with a total population figure of approximately 100 individuals. Of these the largest population close to Augusta, containing 40–50 plants, was considered under threat from roadworks as the population is adjacent to a major road and covers an area of less than 0.1 ha (Masters, unpublished report 1978, cited in Leigh et al. 1984).

The Augusta Kennedia occurs close to the coast in black humus-rich sand, often amongst granite outcrops. Typically the vegetation is low coastal heath, but sometimes Peppermints (Agonis flexuosa) or Karris (Eucalyptus diversicolor) are present (Rye 1982). The mean annual rainfall is approximately 1000 mm (Brown et al. 1998).

Flowering has been recorded from September to November (Leigh et al. 1984; Rye 1982). Honeyeaters feeding on the flowers nectar may be the main pollinators. Unopened pods can remain on the plant for over a year, suggesting the pods take a long time to reach maturity. The species produces numerous seeds which are scattered by mechanical means when the pods split open. Plants are probably killed by fire and regenerate from seed. The seedlings are fast growing (Rye 1982).

Identified Threats

The main identified threats to the Augusta Kennedia include:

  • trampling by tourists
  • inappropriate fire regimes
  • clearing for development
  • weed invasion
  • fragmentation.

Fire

Fire can kill plants of this species, but also stimulates germination of seeds. Therefore, it is important that fire regimes are conducted at frequencies that allow new plants a chance to reproduce and add their seed to the soil-stored seed bank.

Weed Invasion

The threat from weed invasion also increases following fire, and needs to be controlled as part of the fire management strategy (Brown et al. 1998; DEWHA 2007m; Hearn et al. 2004).

Some threat abatement strategies were outlined by Williams and colleagues in their report (Williams et al 2001), however the conservation advice is limited. The strategies for conserving the Augusta Kennedia include:

  • Further survey work (to identify patches yet to be discovered).
  • Control of problem weeds in localised areas known to contain this species.
  • Study into the susceptability of Phytophthora dieback.
  • Barriers to exclude tourists from trampling sites.
  • Protection from inappropriate fire regimes by identifying patches of this species to local fire authorities.
  • Protection from fragmentation and land development by ensuring no or little development occurs within the very limited natural range of the species.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Sea level rise:Inundation associated with climate change Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Kennedia macrophylla (Augusta Kennedia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ej) [Conservation Advice].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Recreational Activities:Disturbance, especially from human recreational activities and development Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Central Forest Region. Part 2 (Williams, K., A. Horan, S. Wood & A. Webb, 2001) [State Species Management Plan].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Recreational Activities:Soil disturbance and/or trampling due to bushwalking Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Kennedia macrophylla (Augusta Kennedia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ej) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Kennedia macrophylla (Augusta Kennedia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ej) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Kennedia macrophylla (Augusta Kennedia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ej) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Central Forest Region. Part 2 (Williams, K., A. Horan, S. Wood & A. Webb, 2001) [State Species Management Plan].
Residential and Commercial Development:Residential and Commercial Development:Habitat modification (clearance and degradation) due to urban development Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Kennedia macrophylla (Augusta Kennedia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008ej) [Conservation Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Central Forest Region. Part 2 (Williams, K., A. Horan, S. Wood & A. Webb, 2001) [State Species Management Plan].

Brown, A., C. Thomson-Dans & N. Marchant, eds. (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Como, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) (2010). Australian Plant Census. [Online]. Australian National Herbarium, Australian National Botanic Gardens and Australian Biological Resources Study . Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/chah/apc/.

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA) (2007m). Biodiversity Assessment - Warren - Species at risk and the Threatening Process. [Online]. Canberra. Available from: http://www.anra.gov.au/topics/vegetation/assessment/wa/ibra-war-species-threats.html.

Hearn, R., K. Williams & S. Comer (2004). Warren. [Online]. Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://www.naturebase.net/pdf/science/bio_audit/warren_p637-655.pdf.

Leigh, J., R. Boden & J. Briggs (1984). Extinct and Endangered Plants of Australia. Melbourne, Victoria: Macmillan.

Rye, B.L. (1982). Augusta Kennedia. Kennedia macrophylla (Meisn.)Benth. (PAPILIONACEAE). Perth: Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Williams, K., A. Horan, S. Wood & A. Webb (2001). Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Central Forest Region. Part 2. [Online]. Western Australian Wildlife Management Program No. 33. Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/plants-and-animals/threatened-species-and-communities/threatened-plants.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Kennedia lateritia in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sat, 30 Aug 2014 16:26:11 +1000.