Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Adenanthos ellipticus (Oval-leaf Adenanthos) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008hk) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Fitzgerald Biosphere Recovery Plan: A Landscape Approach to Threatened Species and Ecological Communities Recovery and Biodiversity Conservation (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2012) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat abatement plan for disease in natural ecosystems caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi (Department of the Environment, 2014a) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Declared Rare & Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District. Western Australian wildlife management program no. 20 (Robinson, C.J. & D.J. Coates, 1995) [State Action Plan].
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Vulnerable (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list)
Scientific name Adenanthos ellipticus [4570]
Family Proteaceae:Proteales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author A.S.George
Infraspecies author  
Reference Nuytsia 1: 383 (23 May 1974).
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images

The Oval-leaf Adenanthos is an erect, slender, open shrub growing to 5 m with orange-red and cream flowers (George 1974; Nelson 1978, 1995: Brown et al. 1998).

This species is restricted to Fitzgerald River National Park, WA (Nelson 1978, 1995), though it has also been reported from 'a peak north-west of Hopetoun', just outside the eastern boundary of the National Park (Brown et al. 1998).

Collected from East Mount Barren many times, and collected once from Thumb Peak in January 1994. A 1992 survey of the East Mount Barren locality failed to locate any mature plants following the 1989 wildfire. However, several thousand seedlings were recorded and a May 1993 collection enabled positive identification of A. ellipticus (Robinson & Coates 1995).

Seedlings similar to those on East Mount Barren (and assumed to be A. ellipticus) have been found on the minor summits below West Mount Barren. These plants had not flowered in Sept. 1993 (Robinson & Coates 1995).

A small remnant of 12 pre-fire mature plants was later located in a protected gully, immediately above the ocean below East Mount Barren (Robinson & Coates 1995).

Summary of populations as in Robinson & Coates (1995):

Population [as
numbered by
WA CALM]
LocationLand StatusYear of survey/
number of plants
Condition
1East Mt BarrenNational Park1992 - 2000+Good
2Thumb PeakNational Park1994 - 10000+Good
3West Mt BarrenNational Park1992 - 1000+Good
4East Mt BarrenNational Park1993 - 12Adults

Some plants on East Mt Barren may be hybrids with A. cuneatus (Nelson 1978, 1995).

Grows in shallow, humus-rich siliceous soils over outcropping quartzite in association with dense scrub (Nelson 1978, 1995; Rye & Hopper 1981; Hopper et al. 1990), and at Thumb Peak on a 'wave cut beach in a minor gully' (Nelson 1978). It is associated with A. cuneata and A. venosa, but A. elliptica is predominant on higher slopes (Nelson 1978; Brown et al. 1998).

Flowering occurs Aug. to Jan., and in Apr. & May (perhaps all year round) (Rye & Hopper 1981; Brown et al. 1998). Plants lack a lignotuber (George 1974; Nelson 1978, 1995).

Adult plants are killed by fire but regenerate freely from seed, with the resulting seedlings growing quite slowly (Brown et al. 1998).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Adenanthos ellipticus in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ba) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Adenanthos ellipticus (Oval-leaf Adenanthos) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008hk) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi Adenanthos ellipticus in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ba) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Adenanthos ellipticus (Oval-leaf Adenanthos) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008hk) [Conservation Advice].

Brown, A., C. Thomson-Dans & N. Marchant, eds. (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Como, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

George, A.S. (1974). Five new species of Adenanthos (Proteaceae) from Western Australia. Nuytsia. 1(4):381-386. Department of Agriculture WA, Perth.

Hopper, S.D., S. van Leeuwen, A.P. Brown & S.J. Patrick (1990). Western Australia's Endangered Flora and other plants under consideration for declaration. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Consrvation and Land Management.

Meredith, L.D. & M.M. Richardson (1990). Rare or Threatened Australian Plant Species in Cultivation in Australia. Report Series No. 15. Page(s) 1-114. Canberra: Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Nelson, E.C. (1978). A taxonomic revision of Adenanthos (Proteaceae). Brunonia. 1(3):303-406.

Nelson, E.C. (1995). Adenanthos. In: Orchard, A.E. & P.M. McCarthy, eds. Flora of Australia. 16:318-342. ABRS, Canberra/CSIRO, Melbourne.

Robinson, C.J. & D.J. Coates (1995). Declared Rare & Poorly Known Flora in the Albany District. Western Australian wildlife management program no. 20. [Online]. Como, Western Australia: Australian Nature Conservation Agency, Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/plants-and-animals/threatened-species-and-communities/threatened-plants.

Rye, B.L. & S.D.Hopper (1981). A Guide to the Gazetted Rare Flora of Western Australia. Report No. 42. Page(s) 1-211. Perth: Department of Fisheries & Wildlife WA.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Adenanthos ellipticus in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 2 Oct 2014 19:35:09 +1000.