Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Acacia lauta
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia lauta (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gy) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia lauta.
 
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Vulnerable (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list) as Acacia lauta
Scientific name Acacia lauta [4165]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Pedley
Infraspecies author  
Reference Austrobaileya 1: 257 (29 Feb. 1980).
Other names Racosperma lautum [31044]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images

Acacia lauta is a shrub 1.5-3 m high, branching from the base (Orchard & Wilson 2001).

This species is restricted to a small region of the Darling Downs in south-eastern Qld, from Tara to Inglewood with a distributional range of approx. 140 km (BRI undated; Halford 1995c).

The most recent survey estimated the total population to be 2008 plants across three populations. The population at 'Marron Glen', about 15 km south-east of Inglewood is the largest with approx. 1890 adults in an area of around 25 ha. The population is on freehold land and about half of the area had been previously cleared of natural vegetation and cultivated (R.Lindner in Halford 1995c).The second population is at Spinifex Corner, 15 km north of Tara and consists of 110 adults in an area of about 1000 x 100 m. Most plants are in a road reserve with a small number on freehold land. The third population is at Goranba Lane, 16 km east of Tara with eight adults in an area of about 30 x 100 m. on a road verge (Halford 1995c).

A fourth unconfirmed population of about 100 plants is reported a short distance from the population at 'Marron Glen' (D.Halford 2001, pers. comm.).

In the Flora of Australia, A. lauta was treated as a synonym of A. johnsonii (Orchard & Wilson 2001), however, following advice from L.Pedley, it is now regarded as a distinct species (Australian National Botanic Gardens 2004a). It can be distinguished by the slightly raised translucent midrib on its phyllodes compared to A. johnsonii, which has one or two obscure raised nerves on its phyllodes (Halford 1995c).

The area where this species grows has a subhumid subtropical climate, with warm to hot, moist summers and cool to cold, dry winters. The localities are characterised by a gently undulating to flat landforms. Soils are moderately deep and hardsetting with a weakly acidic to neutral sandy loam surface grading into neutral to alkaline sandy clay subsoil (Halford 1995c).

The vegetation varies from open forest to low woodland with a dense or moderately dense shrub layer. Tree species present at all sites include Callitris glaucophylla (White Cypress Pine) and Allocasuarina luehmannii (Buloke). The understorey is rather diverse often including shrubs such as Melaleuca nodosa, Melaleuca uncinata, Acacia caroleae, Westringia cheelii, Ozothamnus diotophyllus, Melaleuca diosmatifolia, Kunzea opposita and Hakea purpurea and grasses like Aristida caput-medusae, Aristida jerichoensis var. jerichoensis, Triodia scariosa and Cymbopogon refractus (Halford 1995c).

Flowering has been observed from mid Aug. to mid Sept.; fruits from Oct. to Nov. The main method of regeneration is from seed which falls to the ground beneath the parent plant. However, seeds have a small pale aril (a fleshy growth) which usually suggests secondary dispersal by ants (Halford 1995c).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Acacia lauta in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ak) [Internet].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia lauta (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gy) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Acacia lauta in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ak) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Protected status:Protected status:Lack of secure conservation land tenure Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia lauta (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gy) [Conservation Advice].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia lauta (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gy) [Conservation Advice].
Uncategorised:Uncategorised:threats not specified Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia lauta (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gy) [Conservation Advice].

Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) (2004a). What's Its Name. [Online]. Australian Government Department of the Environment and Heritage. Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/fwhat.

Halford, D. (1995c). Acacia lauta Pedley (Mimosaceae) - Draft Recovery Plan.

Orchard, A.E. & A.J.G. Wilson (eds) (2001). Flora of Australia, Volume 11A, Mimosaceae, Acacia Part 1.

Queensland Herbarium (2008b). Unpublished data.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia lauta in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 1 Aug 2014 22:49:52 +1000.