Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Acacia curranii
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia curranii (Curly-bark Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gt) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat Abatement Plan for Competition and Land Degradation by Feral Rabbits (Environment Australia (EA), 1999c) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Threat Abatement Plan for Competition and Land Degradation by Feral Goats (Environment Australia (EA), 1999d) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Acacia curranii.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Curly-bark Wattle - profile (NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, 2014) [Internet].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Vulnerable (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013 list) as Acacia curranii
QLD: Listed as Vulnerable (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list) as Acacia curranii
Scientific name Acacia curranii [3908]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Maiden
Infraspecies author  
Reference Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales 49 (28 Apr. 1916) 492.
Other names Racosperma curranii [30365]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Other illustrations Google Images

The Curly-bark Wattle is an erect or spreading multi-stemmed shrub with distinctive red curling (minniritchi) bark (Pedley 1978; Harden 1991; Pickard 1995c). Its habit resembles that of broombush (Cunningham et al. 1992). It grows to 3-4 m (Pedley 1978; Harden 1991; Cunningham et al. 1992).

The species has a disjunct distribution in western NSW and south-eastern Qld, occurring in three areas each separated by several hundred kilometres. In NSW it grows in the Lake Cargelligo area and on the Gunderbooka Range near Bourke; in Qld it occurs in the Gurulmundi area, north of Miles. (Pickard 1995c).

About twenty populations are known from ten general localities in the three regions of occurrence (Pickard 1995c). This species is conserved in Nombinnie NR and Gundabooka NP (Pickard 1995c: NSW NPWS 2003j).

Lake Cargelligo area of the South-western Plains of NSW (Harden 1991; Pickard 1995c). Occurs in the Lake Cargelligo-Euabalong west of Mt Hope-Hillston area. Not all seemingly suitable hills in the area support populations (Pickard 1995c).

Gunderbooka Ranges of the North-western Plains of NSW (Harden 1991; Pickard 1995c; NSW NPWS 2003j). This is the most recently discovered area and not mentioned by Orchard & Wilson (2001a). Herbarium specimens suggest that up to five populations may exist (Pickard 1995c). The species grows at two sites 500 m apart on Mt Gunderbooka, in a rugged range (Pickard 1995c; NSW NPWS 2003j).

Gurulmundi area in the Darling Downs district of Qld (Pickard 1995c; Orchard & Wilson 2001a). Plants occur in widely scattered thickets of about ten plants. This distribution centre is less than 20 km across (Pickard 1995c).

Summary of site details as in Pickard (1995c) with additional data from NSW NPWS (2003j)

SiteRegionLand StatusNumber of populations/
Number of plants
1: Mylone-AmboneLake Cargelligo area, NSWLeasehold adjoining Nombinnie NR2c. 2000
2: Nombinnie NRLake Cargelligo area, NSWNature reserve1<10
3: Mt SolitaryLake Cargelligo area, NSWLeasehold 1unknown
4: Mt Solitary/
Rosewood
Lake Cargelligo area, NSWLeasehold 1<10?
5: Shepherds HillLake Cargelligo area, NSWState rail reserve1<1000
6: Yelkin SF (in and near)Lake Cargelligo area, NSWState forest, road reserve, freehold, vacant crown land10<1000
7: Wollongong GapLake Cargelligo area, NSWFreehold11
8: Monia GapLake Cargelligo area, NSWFreehold2>1000
9: Gundabooka NPGunderbooka Range, NSWNational park2c. 150
10: GurulmundiGurulmundi area, QldState forest, road reserve2c. 200

Specimens from Wollongong Gap and Monia Gap near L. Cargelligo have much wider phyllodes than elsewhere. Whether these plants are taxonomically distinct is not known (Pickard 1995b).

Grows most often on rocky outcrops of isolated hills and ranges (Pickard 1995a). Soils are variable between the different centres of distribution (Pickard 1995a,b,c)

This species forms groves (Pedley 1978; Stanley & Ross 1983; Pedley 1987). In NSW typical accompanying species are Acacia doratoxylon, Eucalyptus dwyeri and Callitris glaucophylla (Pickard 1995a). In Qld, the plant occurs in patches in very species-rich heathy scrub (Pickard 1995a).

NSW:
In the Lake Cargelligo area the species grows on the toeslopes and north-facing crests of hills and ranges (Pickard 1995c). All the populations are in stony soil with much bedrock outcrop (Pickard 1995b). There is some variation in lithology: sandstone, rhyolite and trachyte, but the shrub is always on acid rocks (Pickard 1995b). Vegetation communities supporting the species include E. dwyeri, A. triptera, A. doratoxylon mallee/shrubland and E. intertexta - C. glaucophylla, E. microcarpa-C. glaucophylla woodland (Ayers et al. 1996).

In the Gunderbooka Range, A. curranii is found on the crest and slope of the range (Pickard 1995c). The soil is quite stony, probably fairly shallow overlying sandstone (Pickard 1995c). Vegetation communities supporting the species include E. morrisii-C. glaucophylla woodland (Ayers et al. 1996).

QLD:
In Gurulmundi, it occurs on deeply weathered sandstone forming red sandy soils (Pickard 1995c). The soil is stony with patches of deep sand and little evidence of rock outcrop near the patches (Pickard 1995b). The species occurs in widely scattered thickets in patches of diverse heath scrub with emergent trees (Pickard 1995c).

The flowerheads are ovoid-shaped spikes and are golden in colour (Orchard & Wilson 2001a). Flowers are borne Aug.-Sept. (Orchard & Wilson 2001a). Pods ripen in November (Lithgow 1997).

This species may well require fire before the seeds will germinate (Pickard 1995c). Preliminary attempts to germinate seeds by seed scarification have been largely unsuccessful, though this may be due to insect damage or poor development rendering seeds unviable (Pickard 1995c).

Anecdotes and field observations indicate that populations adjacent to Nombinnie NR, at Shepherds Hill and at Gurulmundi are regenerating after disturbance and fire (Pickard 1995b). In general populations which have undergone disturbance (eg. railway spur at Shepherds Hill, and a burnt area on Mylone and Ambone) appear to have many small plants, while undisturbed populations are generally composed entirely of medium to large plants. It is uncertain whether the many small plants that seem to be a result of disturbance are seedlings or root suckers. No recruitment of juveniles was observed at Gundabooka NP (NSW NPWS 2003j).

The three main population regions are considered too isolated for gene flow. Populations within the Lake Cargelligo area are separated by tens of kilometres, possibly sufficient to hinder gene flow (Pickard 1995c).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Acacia curranii in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006af) [Internet].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat modification with associated erosion Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia curranii (Curly-bark Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gt) [Conservation Advice].
Energy Production and Mining:Mining and Quarrying:Habitat destruction, disturbance and/or modification due to mining activities Acacia curranii in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006af) [Internet].
Energy Production and Mining:Mining and Quarrying:Habitat modification through open cut mining/quarrying activities Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Mechanical disturbance during construction, maintanance or recreational activities Acacia curranii in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006af) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) The threat posed by pest animals to biodiversity in New South Wales (Coutts-Smith, A.J., P.S. Mahon, M. Letnic & P.O. Downey, 2007) [Management Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Capra hircus (Goat) Acacia curranii in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006af) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by insects Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia curranii (Curly-bark Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gt) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by kangaroos and wallabies Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Acacia curranii (Curly-bark Wattle) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008gt) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Acacia curranii in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006af) [Internet].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low fecundity, reproductive rate and/or poor recruitment Acacia curranii in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006af) [Internet].

Ayers, D., S. Nash & K. Baggett (Eds) (1996). Threatened Species of Western New South Wales. Hurstville: NSW NPWS.

Cunningham, G.M., W.E. Mulham, P.L. Milthorpe & J.H. Leigh (1992). Plants of Western New South Wales. Melbourne: Inkata Press.

Harden, G.J. (ed.) (1991). Flora of New South Wales, Volume Two. Kensington, NSW: University of NSW Press.

Lithgow, G. (1997). Sixty Wattles of the Chinchilla and Murilla Shires. M.G. Lithgow, Chinchilla, Queensland.

Meredith, L.D. & M.M. Richardson (1990). Rare or Threatened Australian Plant Species in Cultivation in Australia. Report Series No. 15. Page(s) 1-114. Canberra: Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service.

NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service (2003j). Gundabooka National Park - Draft Plan of Management. Page(s) 35. [Online]. NSW Dept of Environment and Conservation. Available from: http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/PDFs/pom_draft_gundabooka.pdf.

Orchard, A.E. & A.J.G. Wilson, eds. (2001a). Flora of Australia, Volume 11B, Mimosaceae, Acacia Part 2. In: Flora of Australia. Canberra, ACT: ABRS & CSIRO.

Pedley, L. (1978). A Revision of Acacia Mill. in Queensland. Austrobaileya. 1(2):75-234.

Pedley, L. (1987). Acacias in Queensland. Brisbane: Department of Primary Industries.

Pickard, J. (1995a). Acacia curranii Maiden (Curly Bark Wattle) Recovery Plan. Australian Nature Conservation Agency.

Pickard, J. (1995b). Acacia curranii Maiden (Curly Bark Wattle) Research Plan. Australian Nature Conservation Agency.

Pickard, J. (1995c). Acacia curranii Maiden (Curly Bark Wattle) Conservation Research Statement. Australian Nature Conservation Agency.

Stanley, T.D. & E.M. Ross (1983). Flora of south-eastern Queensland. Volume One. Brisbane, Queensland: Department of Primary Industries.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia curranii in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:24:03 +1000.