Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lomatia tasmanica (King's Lomatia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2001bb) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National Recovery Plan for Lomatia tasmanica (King's Lomatia) (Department of Primary Industries and Water, Tasmania, 2006 e) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat abatement plan for disease in natural ecosystems caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi (Department of the Environment, 2014a) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (05/10/2001) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2001c) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
TAS:Threatened Species Notesheet - Lomatia tasmanica (Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (Tas. DPIPWE), 2005) [Information Sheet].
TAS:King's Lomatia - the Oldest Plant Clone in the World? (Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (Tas. DPIPWE), 2009b) [Internet].
TAS:King's Lomatia (Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment (Tas. DPIWE), 2004) [Internet].
TAS:Lomatia tasmanica (King's Lomatia): Species Management Profile for Tasmania's Threatened Species Link (Threatened Species Section (TSS), 2014df) [State Action Plan].
State Listing Status
TAS: Listed as Endangered (Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 (Tasmania): September 2012 list)
Scientific name Lomatia tasmanica [3745]
Family Proteaceae:Proteales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author W.M.Curtis
Infraspecies author  
Reference The Student's Flora of Tasmania Pt. 3: 614, 651, fig. 131 (1967).
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/threatened/hollypic.html

King's Lomatia is a distinctive tall shrub, usually growing to 2-4 m tall, but may be up to 6-8 m in height. The plants are thin and spindly, usually branched at the top or sometimes leaning with a few erect branches. Flowers are crimson (Leigh & Briggs 1992; Lynch 1991; Wilson et al. 1995).

King's Lomatia is endemic to south-western Tas. The geographical range of the species was probably more extensive in the past. Originally found in 1934 on the New Harbour Range in south-western Tas., it has not been relocated at that site. The only known existing population is in the southern foothills of the Bathurst Range, near Cox Bight, Southwest NP and about 5 km west of the type locality. It consists of several hundred stems (estimated at 500) that occur in clustered patches over a total distance of 1.2 km (Lazarus et al. 2003; Lynch et al. 1998).

A late Pleistocene (at least 43,600 year old) macrofossil of Lomatia tasmanica was found at Melaleuca Inlet, less than 10 km from the extant population (Jordan et al. 1991; Leigh & Briggs 1992; Lynch 1991; Wilson et al. 1995).

This species occurs in mixed forest in the gully between two creeks. It extends over about 2-3 ha between 80 and 280 m altitude. The forest is composed of Eucalyptus nitida at 25 m height emerging from tangled rainforest at 13-18 m dominated by Nothofagus cunninghamii (Myrtle), Phyllocladus aspleniifolius (Celery-top Pine) and Eucryphia lucida (Leatherwood). A shrub layer between 2-8 m includes Anopterus glandulosus (Native Laurel), Anodopetalum biglandulosum (Horizontal) and Cenarrhenes nitida (Native Plum). There is a patchy fern layer (Leigh & Briggs 1992; Lynch 1991; Brown & Gray 1985 in Lynch 1991).

L. tasmanica is scattered amongst rainforest relicts along the margins of several creek gullies. The surrounding region, including the area between the creeks, is dominated by Gymnoschoenus (Buttongrass) sedgeland, scrub and rainforest (Lynch et al. 1998).

Flowering is occasional but not annual (Lynch et al. 1998; Wilson et al. 1995) and has been observed in Jan.-Feb., with old flowers collected in Mar. and Aug. (Lazarus et al. 2003; Lynch 1991). No fruit or seed has ever been observed on wild or cultivated specimens (Lazarus et al. 2003). The population appears to be sustained by root suckering and coppicing (Lynch et al. 1998].

No genetic diversity was found in an allozyme analysis. The apparent sterility and lack of genetic diversity suggest that the entire population is a single clone (genet). This is consistent with the observations that:
1. L. tasmanica shows no morphological variation by comparison with its highly variable congeners L. tinctoria, L. polymorpha and L. fraseri;
2. it propagates vegetatively;
3. it appears to be unable to produce fruit; and
4. it is a genetic triploid, having 33 chromosomes compared to the 22 present in other Lomatia species (Lynch et al. 1998).

The diploid ancestor of L. tasmanica is likely to be a species that has disappeared from Tasmania. Fossilised leaves identified as L. tasmanica and dated as at least 43,600 years old may indicate the minimum age of the triploid clone (Lazarus et al. 2003; Lynch et al. 1998).

The growth rate of this shrub species is very slow under the cold climate of south-western Tas. A stem 6.3 cm diameter was estimated as 240 years old using dendrochronology, i.e. 0.26 mm per year (Brown & Gray 1985).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lomatia tasmanica (King's Lomatia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2001bb) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi Threat abatement plan for disease in natural ecosystems caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2009w) [Threat Abatement Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Lomatia tasmanica Flora Recovery Plan: Research Plan Phase (Lynch, A.J.J., 1991) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Genetic evidence that Lomatia tasmanica (Proteaceae) is an ancient clone. Australian Journal of Botany. 46:25-33. (Lynch, A.J.J., R.W. Barnes, J. Cambecedes & R.E. Vaillancourt, 1998) [Journal].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lomatia tasmanica (King's Lomatia) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2001bb) [Listing Advice].

Brown, M.J. & A.M. Gray (1985). Lomatia tasmanica - a rare endemic plant from Tasmania's South-west. The Tasmanian Naturalist. 83:1-3.

Jordan, G.J., R.J. Carpenter & R.S. Hill (1991). Late Pleistocene vegetation and climate near Melaleuca Inlet, south-western Tasmania. Australian Journal of Botany. 39:315-333.

Lazarus, E., N. Lawrence & W. Potts (2003). Threatened Flora of Tasmania. [Online]. Threatened Species Unit, DPIWE, Tasmania. Available from: http://www.gisparks.tas.gov.au/ThreatenedFloraCD/home2.htm#.

Leigh, J.H. & J.D. Briggs (Eds) (1992). Threatened Australian Plants. Overview and Case Studies. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Lynch, A.J.J. (1991). Lomatia tasmanica Flora Recovery Plan: Research Plan Phase. Hobart: Tasmanian Parks & Wildlife.

Lynch, A.J.J. & J. Balmer (prep.). The ecology, phytosociology and stand structure of the endangered plant Lomatia tasmanica W.M.Curtis (Proteaceae). Page(s) 1-17.

Lynch, A.J.J., R.W. Barnes, J. Cambecedes & R.E. Vaillancourt (1998). Genetic evidence that Lomatia tasmanica (Proteaceae) is an ancient clone. Australian Journal of Botany. 46:25-33.

Meredith, L.D. & M.M. Richardson (1990). Rare or Threatened Australian Plant Species in Cultivation in Australia. Report Series No. 15. Page(s) 1-114. Canberra: Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Wilson, A.J.G., H.J. Hewson & J. Mowatt (1995). Lomatia. In: Orchard, A.E. & P.M. McCarthy, eds. Flora of Australia. 16:374-382. ABRS, Canberra/CSIRO, Melbourne.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Lomatia tasmanica in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Wed, 24 Sep 2014 04:12:16 +1000.