Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Macropus robustus isabellinus
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island Euro) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008fw) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011j) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Macropus robustus isabellinus.
 
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Vulnerable (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list) as Macropus robustus isabellinus
Scientific name Macropus robustus isabellinus [26196]
Family Macropodidae:Diprotodonta:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author  
Infraspecies author (Gould, 1842)
Reference  
Other names Macropus robustus isabellensis [64471]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific Name: Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island)

Common Name: Barrow Island Wallaroo, Barrow Island Euro

The Barrow Island Wallaroo is a stocky, dark-backed marsupial with a paler coloured belly and coarse, shaggy fur (Strahan 2002; van Dyck & Strahan 2008). It is smaller than the mainland form of the Wallaroo. While the mainland form have an average weight of 35 kg (male) and 16 kg (female), the Barrow Island Wallaroo is much smaller, with an average weight of 20 kg (male) and 8 kg (female). This species has a relatively short, thick tail (Cronin 1991; Strahan 2002).

The Barrow Island Wallaroo is a subspecies of the Common Wallaroo, Macropus robustus, which is distributed widely across Australia. The Barrow Island Wallaroo only occurs on the Barrow Island off the Pilbara coast of Western Australia, to the west of Karratha.

The Barrow Island Wallaroo is present throughout Barrow Island and has an extent of occurrence of 233 kmē. Barrow Island Wallaroos occur mainly in the deeply dissected country in the central west of the Island in the low lying grassy areas dominated by species other than Triodia (Short & Turner 1991) and so their area of occuapancy is likely to be less than the whole of the Barrow Island area.

The Barrow Island Wallaroo only occurs on Barrow Island, Western Australia.

The Barrow Island Wallaroo is a subspecies which occurs only on Barrow Island. Population numbers were assessed during a survey of 50 randomly assigned 1 kmē blocks in 1988. Wallabies occurred on 22 of these blocks at densities which gave an estimate for the entire island of approximately 1800 individuals (Short & Turner 1991).

Short and Turner (1991) conducted a survey in 1991, using spotlight surveys along line transects chosen by restricted random sampling within 50 1 kmē blocks chosen randomly within three major habitat strata. While annual surveys are conducted on Barrow Island by the Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management (see Morris et al. 2001, 2002), the Barrow Island Wallaroos are not surveyed under this program. Mammal surveys have more recently been conducted in association with the previously proposed Gorgon gas development (see Bamford et al 2005) and the proposed revised and expanded Gorgon gas development (Chevron Australia 2008).

The survey conducted by Short and Turner (1991) suggested a total population of 1800 Barrow Island Wallaroo. Total population figures range from 1500 (Short et al. 1988 cited in Bamford et al 2005) to 528–914 (Burbidge et al. 2003 cited in Bamford et al 2005).

Barrow Island is a declared Class A Reserve, reserved under Section 41 of the Land Administration Act (1997), Western Australia, for the purpose of conservation of flora and fauna.

Barrow Island is a small, limestone island dominated by Triodia grasslands. Barrow Island Wallaroos occur mainly in the deeply dissected country in the central west of the island, along coastal fringes where low cliffs provide shade and in flood-out flats where grasses other than Triodia dominate (Short & Turner 1991).

The Barrow Island Wallaroo is reported to feed on growing flower stalks of Triodia (Short & Turner 1991).

The introduction of invasive animals and plants to Barrow Island and inappropriate fire regimes represent the greatest potential threats to the population of the Barrow Island Wallaroo.

Processing facilities have been present on the Island since the mid 1960s and there have been approximately 10 000 cargo landings of both marine barges and aircraft since the 1960s (Bowen 2005) while there have also been several hundred thousand movements of people on and off the Island. Two breaches of quarantine have resulted in vertebrate introductions, including two house mice found in a drilling rig in 1995 and a single mouse found in a car wreck imported for emergency training purposes in 1998. These mice were contained and eradicated (Lagdon 2002 cited in Bowen 2005). There are four introduced weed species which have a small presence around the airport and camp facilities (Lagdon 2002 cited in Bowen 2005).

Casson (2003) reports that naturally occuring fires on Barrow Island have been suppressed over the last 40 years or so and that the continued surpression of naturally occuring fires may eventually alter the vegetation structure, particularly the ratio of fire sensitive/fire adapted species.

A study into the levels of genetic diversity among Barrow Island Wallaroos was undertaken by Eldridge and associates (in prep.) and a comparison of metabolism among Barrow Island Wallaroos, the Burrowing Bettong and the mainland Wallaroo was undertaken by Billiards and colleagues in 1999.

The Barrow Island Wallaroo is included in the 1996 Commonwealth Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes (Maxwell et al 1996).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Ecosystem Degradation:Decline in habitat quality Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island Euro) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008fw) [Conservation Advice].
Energy Production and Mining:Mining and Quarrying:Habitat destruction, disturbance and/or modification due to mining activities Management of disturbance in an arid remnant: the Barrow Island Experience. In: Saunder, D.A., G.W. Arnold, A.A. Burbidge & A.J.M. Hopkins, eds. Nature Conservation: The Role of Remnants of Native Vegetation. Page(s) 279-285. (Butler, W.H., 1987) [Book].
Macropus robustus isabellinus in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ny) [Internet].
Energy Production and Mining:Oil and Gas Drilling:Habitat modification due to oil/gas/petroleum activities Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island Euro) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008fw) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Macropus robustus isabellinus in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ny) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Management of disturbance in an arid remnant: the Barrow Island Experience. In: Saunder, D.A., G.W. Arnold, A.A. Burbidge & A.J.M. Hopkins, eds. Nature Conservation: The Role of Remnants of Native Vegetation. Page(s) 279-285. (Butler, W.H., 1987) [Book].
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island Euro) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008fw) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Macropus robustus isabellinus in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006ny) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Management of disturbance in an arid remnant: the Barrow Island Experience. In: Saunder, D.A., G.W. Arnold, A.A. Burbidge & A.J.M. Hopkins, eds. Nature Conservation: The Role of Remnants of Native Vegetation. Page(s) 279-285. (Butler, W.H., 1987) [Book].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low genetic diversity and genetic inbreeding Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island Euro) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008fw) [Conservation Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island Euro) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008fw) [Conservation Advice].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Vehicle related mortality Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Macropus robustus isabellinus (Barrow Island Euro) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008fw) [Conservation Advice].

Bamford, M.J, Bamford, A.R, Biota Environmental Services, RPS Bowman Bishaw Gorham (2005). Technical Appendix C2 of Gorgon Gas Development - Mammals and Reptiles. Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Review and Management Programme for the Gorgon Development. [Online]. Chevron Australia Pty Ltd. Available from: http://www.chevronaustralia.com/ourbusinesses/gorgon/environmentalresponsibility/environmentalapprovals.aspx.

Billiards, S.S, King, J.M, Agar, N.S (1999). Comparative erythrocyte metabolism in three species of marsupials from Western Australia. Comparative Haematology International. 9:86-91.

Bowen, B (2005). Technical Appendix D1-D5 Quarantine Expert Panel Advice to the Gorgon Joint Venture. Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Review and Management Programme for the Gorgon Development. [Online]. Chevron Australia Pty Ltd. Available from: http://www.gorgon.com.au/03moe_eis.html#frames(content=03moe_eis_body.html).

Casson, N. (2003). Overview of the influence of fire on spinifex ecosystems, with particular reference to the ecosystem of Barrow Island. Report to the Department of Environment Protection, Western Australia. [Online]. Available from: http://www.epa.wa.gov.au/template.asp?area=EIA&ID=36&Cat=Gorgon+Gas+Project+Information.

Chevron Australia Pty Ltd (2008). Public Environmental Review for the Gorgon Gas Development Revised and Expanded Proposal. [Online]. Chevron Australia Pty Ltd. Available from: http://www.gorgon.com.au/03moe_environmentalreview.html#frames(content=03moe_environmentalreview_body.html).

Cronin, L. (1991). Key Guide to Australian Mammals. Balgowlah, NSW: Reed Books.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) (2011j). Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5. [Online]. EPBC Act policy statement: Canberra, ACT: DSEWPAC. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/publications/threatened-mammals.html.

Eldridge M.D.B, King, J.M, Bradshaw, S.D (in prep.). Low levels of genetic diverstiy, inbreeding and reduced fitness in the Barrow Island population of the euro Macropus robustus (Marsupialia: Macropodidae). Molecular Ecology.

Maxwell, S., A.A. Burbidge & K. Morris (1996). The 1996 Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes. [Online]. Wildlife Australia, Environment Australia. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/resource/action-plan-australian-marsupials-and-monotremes.

Morris, K. Burbidge, A.A., Drew, M., & Kregor, G. (2001). Mammal monitoring, Barrow Island Nature Reserve, October 2001. Department of Conservation and Land Management. Woodvale, Western Australia.

Morris, K., Burbidge, A.A, Drew, M., Kregor, G. (2002). Mammal monitoring, Barrow Island Nature Reserve, October 2002. Department of Conservation and Land Management. Woodvale, Western Australia.

Short, J. & B. Turner (1991). Distribution and abundance of spectacled hare-wallabies and euros on Barrow Island, Western Australia. Wildlife Research. 18:421-429.

Strahan, R. (Ed.) (1998). The Mammals of Australia, Second Edition, rev. Sydney, NSW: Australian Museum and Reed New Holland.

Van Dyck, S. & R. Strahan (2008). The Mammals of Australia, Third Edition. Page(s) 880. Sydney: Reed New Holland.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Macropus robustus isabellinus in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sun, 13 Jul 2014 00:03:07 +1000.