Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by Feral Cats (Environment Australia (EA), 1999b) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011j) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
Non-government
    Documents and Websites
The action plan for threatened Australian macropods 2011-2021 (World Wildlife Fund for Nature - Australia (WWF), 2011).
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Endangered (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Endangered (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
Scientific name Petrogale persephone [226]
Family Macropodidae:Diprotodonta:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author Maynes,1982
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Petrogale persephone

Common name: Proserpine Rock-wallaby

The Proserpine Rock-wallaby was first observed by biologists in 1976, and described in 1982 (Maynes 1982).

The overall fur colour of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby is light brown (grey in freshly moulted individuals) turning to yellow-brown on the outer limbs. Sparse white hairs often give it a grey-mauve tinge. It has a pale grey band from the corner of the mouth to the ears. The paws and feet are black, and the backs of the ears are blackish brown. It grows to 64 cm long and 60 cm tall. The last third of the very long, bushy tail is black, but the tail usually ends in a white or cream tip. The tail has a reddish base. Males can weigh up to 8.8 kg, and females up to 6.4 kg (Queensland EPA 2006a; Sharman et al. 1995).

The Proserpine Rock-wallaby has the smallest known distribution of any Rock-wallaby, and is limited to near the towns of Proserpine and Airlie Beach, in the Whitsunday Shire of northern Queensland (Nolan 1997; Nolan & Johnson 2000). It occurs in the western margins of the Conway Range (the northern and eastern sections of this margin) in Conway National Park, Dryander National Park, around the town of Airlie Beach, and on Gloucester Island. There is a small translocated population on Hayman Island (Nolan & Johnson 2000). Schaper and Nolan (2000) and the Queensland Environment Protection Agency (EPA) (2002) found evidence of the Proserpine Rock Wallaby at the following locations:

Clarkes Range (North) (western limit)
Mount Julian
Mount Lucas
Mandalay Point
Charlies Creek
Stripe Point
Box Creek
Puritan Bay
Conway
South western Conway Peninsula (southern limit)
Gloucester Island (northern limit)
Grimstone Point
Dryander
Repulse Creek
Bluff Point
Pioneer Point
Flame Tree Hill
Cannondale
Sugarloaf.

The total area of known and potential habitat of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby is around 17 000 ha. The wallaby has been confirmed to live in an area of around 13 500 ha (Nolan & Johnson 2000; Schaper & Nolan 2000).

Wild Proserpine Rock-wallabies occur in three main regions: Conway Range / Mt Dryander, Clarke Range, and Gloucester Island (Close 2001). These three regions are separated by substantial areas of unsuitable habitat. Proserpine Rock-wallabies at Clarke Range are isolated from other subpopulations by around 20 km of unsuitable vegetation and cleared land (Schaper & Nolan 2000). Between 24 and 26 colonies of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby are known in the wild (Close 2001; Nolan 1997; Nolan & Johnson 2000).

Proserpine Rock-wallabies have been translocated to Hayman Island, around 30 km north-east of Airlie Beach. Since 1998, 27 wallabies have been released (Johnson et al. 2003; Schaper & Nolan 2000).

Ground surveys to locate colonies of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby were conducted from 1989 to 2000. Researchers surveyed an area between Mackay and Bowen up to 75 km inland from the coast, and confirmed that the Proserpine Rock-wallaby was present at 24 sites (Nolan & Johnson 2000). Surveys to find suitable habitat and further colonies of the species continue. Close (2001) states that 25 colonies have now been discovered.

The population size of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby is small, because it occurs in limited habitat within a small geographical area.

In 1997, 14 colonies of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby were on private land, nine in National Parks (Conway Range National Park, Dryander National Park and Gloucester Island National Park), two in State Forests (Conway and Dryander State Forests, and State Forest 387) and one on Crown Land (south of Mandalay Point). Sixty percent of the wallaby's confirmed habitat (8152 ha) is in State-owned land, including 41% in National Parks (5541 ha) (Schaper & Nolan 2000). In 1996, an area of 1100 ha containing 850 ha of habitat for the Proserpine Rock-wallaby adjacent to Dryander National Park was acquired by the Queensland Government and added to the Park. Since then, 650 ha of land in the Clarke Range managed by the Queensland Department of Natural Resources has been secured as an Environmental Reserve (Nolan & Johnson 2000).

The Proserpine Rock-wallaby is the only species of Rock-wallaby to live exclusively in rainforest (Winkel 1997a). It lives in sites with large boulder piles and perched boulders creating crevices, tunnels and overhangs (Winkel 1997b). On the mainland, it inhabits boulder outcrops in pockets of semi-deciduous, semi-evergreen or complex microphyll or notophyll vine forest (dry rainforest containing two canopy layers of trees with leaves 2.5 to 12.5 cm long, some deciduous canopy and emergent trees, large woody vines, and often with thorny or spiny shrubs in the understorey) (Harden et al. 2006; McDonald 1995; Nolan 1997). This habitat generally occurs on foothills near open woodland (Delaney 1993).

In Gloucester Island National Park, the Proserpine Rock-wallaby prefers littoral (beachside) habitat. It uses rocky outcrops and rock piles covered with dry vine scrub, usually associated with beach scrub. At higher elevations, its habitat is rocky outcrops, rock piles and rocky creeks within an Acacia open forest (Nolan 1997; Nolan & Johnson 2000). On Hayman Island, where the wallaby has been translocated, it occurs in association with boulder piles covered with vine thicket (low dry rainforest with one canopy layer and many vines and thorny shrubs, Harden et al. 2006) or vine forest (Schaper & Nolan 2000).

According to the Queensland EPA (2006b), the following species of trees are native to the habitat of the Proserpine Rock Wallaby:

Large trees
Milky Pine (Alstonia scholaris)
Brown Tulip Oak (Argyrodendron polyandrum)
Cluster Fig (Ficus racemosa)
White Fig (Ficus virens)
Bumpy Ash (Flindersia schottiana)
Foam Bark (Jagera pseudorhus)
Mackay Cedar (Paraserian toona)
Burdekin Plum (Pleiogyniun timorense)
Damson (Terminalia sericocarpa)


Small and medium trees
Milky Pine (Acmenosperma claviflorum)
Soap Tree (Alphitonia excelsa)
Coogera (Arytera divaricata)
Hard Bolly Gum (Beilschmiedia obtusifolia)
Cordia dichotoma
Brown Laurel (Cryptocarya triplinervis)
Maiden's Blush (Euroschinus falcate)
Cheese Tree (Glochidion apodogynum)
Macaranga (Macaranga involucrata)
Macaranga (Macaranga tanarius)
Red Kamala (Mallotus philippensis)
White Cedar (Melia azedarach)
Celery Wood (Polyscias elegans)
Peanut Tree (Sterculia quadrifida)

There is no permanent free water in most sites occupied by the Proserpine Rock-wallaby, but there are ephemeral creeks, and dew and rainwater collect on plants and in rock crevices and hollow logs. The wallaby will also drink from water sources in suburban gardens (Winkel 1997b).

From a habitat model for the Proserpine Rock-wallaby, Holloway (2001) concluded that the most important characteristics are:

  • Relatively short trees with a large girth, and a dense understorey of vines and saplings. These features are typical of low-growing vine thickets, rainforest margins and partially disturbed rainforest with gaps in the canopy. Such vegetation structure offers the densest cover, and food for herbivores is often particularly abundant in ecotone habitat (the margin between different vegetation types).
  • A high proportion of rock cover on the ground, but relatively few pebble-sized or very large rocks. Rock-wallabies rely on boulder piles for shelter, and these are in areas containing numerous medium-sized and large rocks.
  • A convex slope. Ridge lines and rocky outcrops with a convex slope are most likely to have boulder piles at the base of the slope, because weathered boulders have broken off from the ridge top and rolled down.

Vine forest habitat near Proserpine contains two plants listed as vulnerable under the EPBC Act: Neisosperma kilneri (six of nine records of this tree are at Mt Dryander), and Medicosma obovata (the only records of this small tree are at Mt Dryander) (Nolan & Johnson 2000). This habitat also contains fifteen species of plants that are listed as rare under the Nature Conservation (Wildlife) Regulation 1992 (Queensland EPA 2006a).

In captivity, female Proserpine Rock-wallabies are sexually mature at around 20.5 months old, and males at around 25 months old (Johnson & Delean 1999).

The Proserpine Rock-wallaby breeds year round. Females mate within hours of giving birth, and the timing of development is such that the next young is born the day after the previous one leaves the pouch permanently. Young leave the pouch at around 209 days old, and in captivity they are weaned around 122 days later (Johnson & Delean 1999).

The Proserpine Rock-wallaby is opportunistic in its diet. It eats at least 142 species of plants, including grass (54%), leaves (and sometimes fruit) of trees (31.5%), vines (7.5%), shrubs (7.5%), fungi and herbs (1%). The diet contains more tree leaves during the dry season than the wet season, because the wallaby eats leaf litter on the forest floor. It eats fallen fruit when available. The most important trees and shrubs in its diet are Archer Cherry (Aidia racemosa), Argyrodendron spp. (including Brown Tulip Oak), Capparis spp (native caper bushes and climbers), Boonah Tuckeroo (Cupaniopsis wadsworthii), Figs (Ficus spp.), Crow Ash (Malaisia scandens), Neiosperma spp. (including Milkbush), Burdekin Plum (Pleiogynium timorense), and Coastal Sophora (Sophora tomentosa). The most commonly eaten grasses are Hooked-hairy Panic Grass (Ancistrachne uncinulata), Button Grass (Dactyloctenium spp.), Bluegrasses (Dicanthium spp.), Clustered Lovegrass (Eragrostris elongata), Russell River Grass (Paspalum paniculatum), Guinea Grass (Panicum maximum), Fairy Grass or Couch (Sporobolus spp.), Kangaroo Grass or Oatgrass (Themeda spp.) and Whorled Pigeon Grass (Setaria verticillata). Proserpine Rock-wallabies on Gloucester Island also eat Pandanus sp. (Winkel 1997b).

During dry periods the Proserpine Rock-wallaby sometimes visits the edge of the forest and road verges to feed on grasses, including Guinea Grass (Nolan & Johnson 2000; Schaper & Nolan 2000). It will enter gardens and consume domestic plants such as hibiscus flowers, balsam and vegetables (Winkel 1997a).

Proserpine Rock-wallabies are essentiallly nocturnal, and do not usually move far from their rock shelters when foraging (Menkhorst & Knight 2001). Of the 15 wallabies initially translocated to Hayman Island, eight remained in the forest patch where they were released, and seven moved up to 1 km between patches (Schaper & Nolan 2000).

By radio-tracking one female and five males, Winkel (1997b) estimated that during the dry season the average home range of male Proserpine Rock-wallabies was 13.6 ha, and the home range of the female was 12.4 ha. During the wet season the average home range of male Proserpine Rock-wallabies was 20.1 ha, and the home range of the female was 9.7 ha. The average home range overall was 22 ha, and the ranges of individuals in the same area overlapped by 14% on average.

Proserpine Rock-wallabies sometimes graze in groups of two to five, and a group of six related females has been observed feeding together. A group of four to eight tends to rest together in the same boulder pile, or in the same section of a line of boulders (Winkel 1997b).

The Proserpine Rock-wallaby is cautious, and difficult to trap and observe (Holloway 2001). It is mainly nocturnal, but will sun itself in cool weather (Tipping et al. 2004).

The distribution of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby overlaps in some areas of its range with that of the Unadorned Rock-wallaby (Petrogale inornata). The two species are distinguished by differences in habitat preferences and appearance. The Unadorned Rock-wallaby occurs in rocky habitat within open forest, rather than within rainforest. The Unadorned Rock-wallaby has a rounder face, is smaller, has brown fur, lacks bold facial patterns, and never has a white tail tip or a brown or paler patch of fur at the base of the tail (Menkhorst & Knight 2001; Nolan & Johnson 2000; Winkel 1997b). Rock-wallaby droppings are characteristically long and cylindrical. Droppings alone cannot be used to distinguish between Unadorned and Proserpine Rock-wallabies; Rock-wallaby droppings near rock shelters in vine forest are likely to originate from Proserpine Rock-wallabies, and those in woodland from Unadorned Rock-wallabies (Tipping et al. 2004).

The Red-legged Pademelon (Thylogale stigmatica) also occurs in Proserpine Rock-wallaby habitat. It is a small, stocky macropod with a short, naked tail and reddish-brown fur, except for the back and shoulders which are grey-brown, and its chest and belly which are cream (Johnson & Vernes 1995). The droppings of the Red-legged Pademelon and Proserpine Rock-wallaby overlap in size. The droppings of the Red-legged Pademelon are shorter and more compact in shape than those of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby, and are flat at one end and squareish at both ends rather than round at one and pinched off to a narrow point at the other. Pademelons leave droppings on the forest floor or occassionally on low, flat rocks, whereas Proserpine Rock-wallabies leave droppings on rocks, ledges, the forest floor, or on horizontal tree trunks. Analysis of the hair in droppings (swallowed while grooming) can also distinguish between them. Winkel (1997b) contains photo-micrographs of hair casts and cross-sections, and photographs of droppings of Proserpine Rock-wallabies and other macropods in the same habitats.

According to Winkel (1997b), the Swamp Wallaby (Wallabia bicolor) is most often mistaken for the Proserpine Rock Wallaby. The Swamp Wallaby hops with a characteristic gait with its head down and tail straight, whereas the Proserpine Rock Wallaby carries its more furry tail slightly arched over its back (Merchant 1995; Sharman et al. 1995; Winkel 1997b). The Swamp Wallaby has a rusty-orange fur 'cap' in front of its ears, whereas the Proserpine Rock-wallaby has a grey head. Both species have dark paws and feet, and sometimes a white tail tip (Winkel 1997b).

Before beginning a survey to detect the Proserpine Rock-wallaby, daytime searches can be used to find potentially suitable habitat (caves, rock boulders and rock ledges within notophyll and microphyll vine forest). Searches of areas up to 5 ha should be along transects spaced at 50 to 100 m intervals. The placement of transects should be planned in advance using aerial photographs and maps. As a guide, for every 1 ha surveyed, at least two hours should be spent searching for potential habitat and signs of activity. It is possible to confirm the presence of Proserpine Rock-wallabies by trapping, collecting predator scats, owl casts or remains for hair analysis, and by conducting genetic analysis of hair and tissue (Tipping et al. 2004), or by using remote video monitoring (Queensland EPA 2002).

The Proserpine Rock-wallaby can be surveyed using daytime searches for droppings, and rock shelters worn smooth from wallabies resting. Winkel (1997b) recommended using faecal pellet counts and spotlighting to identify areas used by Proserpine Rock-wallabies prior to any clearing of potential habitat. The species can also be surveyed by direct observations of wallabies basking during the day, or becoming active at dusk. The species is also active during the day at sites above 140 m elevation (Nolan 1997). Observers use binoculars from a location on the ground beneath suitable habitat or possibly from a helicopter (avoiding excessive disturbance to animals, so that they do not panic and fall) (Tipping et al. 2004).

Habitat clearing
Most of the threats to the Proserpine Rock-wallaby come from development within its habitat, particularly for housing. Lowland woodland and riparian forest in the region of Airlie Beach and Proserpine are cleared for sugar cane and cattle grazing, which isolates remaining rainforest fragments on the surrounding slopes, and limits dispersal of Proserpine Rock-wallabies. Rainforest on steeper slopes in the region is cleared for both intensive housing developments (where no forest remains in the site) and acreage housing developments (where larger blocks often contain forest) (Nolan & Johnson 2000; Winkel 1997b). Between 1994 and 1997, the number of development applications in coastal areas of the Whitsunday shire increased by a third (Nolan 1997). Approximately 40% of the wallaby's remaining habitat occurs on freehold and leasehold land (Nolan & Johnson 2000; Queensland EPA 2006a).

Vehicle collisions
Housing developments include road construction through the habitat of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby. The wallaby sometimes grazes on road verges, especially during the dry season, and this leads to road deaths (Nolan & Johnson 2000; Queensland EPA 2006a; Winkel 1997b).

Predation
Feral dogs, dingoes and domestic dogs attack Proserpine Rock-wallabies, and wallaby hairs and remains have been found in dingo scats. A pack of seven dogs was observed in Proserpine Rock-wallaby habitat at Mt Julian (Winkel 1997b). Dogs can also kill wallabies by harrassing them, so they die from stress. Dogs travel along roads and tracks, and they sometimes kill wallabies by trapping them against fences. Housing developments create fences and tracks, and bring more domestic dogs into Proserpine Rock-wallaby habitat (Nolan & Johnson 2000; Winkel 1997b). Proserpine Rock-wallabies may also be preyed upon by eagles, pythons and cats (capable of killing joeys) (Queensland EPA 2006a; Reddiex & Forsyth 2004).

Disease
Feral and domestic cats are the definitive hosts of the damaging blood parasite Toxoplasmosis gondii, which is spread through cat faeces and can cause death and blindness in macropods. The disease has been confirmed in a wild Proserpine Rock-wallaby at Mandalay Point, but the extent of its impact is unknown (Nolan & Johnson 2000; Schaper & Nolan 2000). Dogs are hosts for the parasitic hydatid tapeworm (Echinococcus granulosus). Hydatids occur in Proserpine Rock-wallabies and can be debilitating or fatal. A wild male near Proserpine was confirmed to have died from hydatid cyst damage to the lungs, but the impact of the disease on population dynamics is unknown (Johnson et al. 1998).

Toxic garden plants
In the dry season, Proserpine Rock-wallabies sometimes leave the rainforest at night to feed in household gardens, where they may eat toxic plants. Potentially lethal plants include Pink Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), Mother of Millions (Kalanchue spp.), Oleander (Nerium oleander), Yellow Oleander (Thevetia peruviana), Rhoeo (Rhoeo discolor), Brazilian Nightshade (Solanum seaforthianum), Fruit Salad Plant (Monstera deliciosa), Elephant Ear (Colocasia antiquorum), Dumb Cane (Dieffenbachia maculata), Yellow Allamanda (Allamanda cathartica), Angel's Trumpet (Datura metel), Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), Pepper Tree (Schinus terebinthifolius), Coral Bush (Jatropha podagrica), Arum Lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), and Castor Oil Plant (Ricinus communis) (Queensland EPA 2006a). Pink Periwinkle has invaded the wallaby's habitat on Gloucester Island, where it may pose a considerable poisoning threat (Batianoff & Dillewaard 1994; Nolan & Johnson 2000).

Fire
Although the Proserpine Rock-wallaby inhabits rainforest, wildfires could potentially burn its habitat during droughts, especially in the drier locations (Gloucester Island, and the translocated population at Hayman Island). Because the distribution of the species is very small, fire could destroy entire subpopulations (Close 2001; Schaper & Nolan 2000; Winkel 1997b).

Climate change
Because of its extremely specific habitat requirements and limited distribution, the Proserpine Rock-wallaby is likely to be threatened by climate change (Clancy & Close 1997).

Recommended recovery actions from the Proserpine Rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone Recovery Plan 2000–2004 (Nolan & Johnson 2000) are to:

  • maintain and protect known habitat
  • increase community awareness and involvement (especially among land owners of habitat critical to the species' survival)
  • release captive bred animals into the wild within suitable and appropriate habitat, and ensure the wild population is self-sustaining
  • minimise disease, incidental kills and other destructive impacts on populations.

    Nolan & Johnson (2000) consider that community awareness and participation in the protection of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby and its habitat is crucial. Holloway (2001) recommended that land agreements with the Shire Council could be used to protect the habitat of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby on privately-owned land, for example using a rate deferment system. He also suggested that vegetation corridors be established between the most isolated patches of habitat. Residents that have Proserpine Rock-wallabies on their property are given information about entering a formal conservation agreement, extending and improving the habitat, and planting vegetation corridors to link patches of habitat (Close 2001). Winkel (1997b) suggested that native vegetation should be protected along creeklines, because these are likely to be important dispersal routes for Proserpine Rock-wallabies. A 'Land for Wildlife' programme started in 2000, and several landholders have registered Proserpine Rock-wallaby habitat on their properties (Queensland EPA 2002).

    The Queensland EPA has published a list of suitable trees that are available from local plant nurseries and can be used for habitat restoration. Rainforest tree seedlings should be planted 1.5 to 2 m apart. Weeds should be cleared at least 1 m around each seedling, the grass slashed, and if seedlings are likely to be grazed or trampled, the area around them should be fenced. The Queensland National Parks and Wildlife Service office at Airlie Beach offers advice on habitat restoration and conservation (Queensland EPA 2006b).

    Winkel (1997b) suggested that routes for new roads should be planned to avoid known colonies of Proserpine Rock-wallabies. Other ways to reduce road deaths include speed limits shown on large signs at either end of sections of habitat, wildlife reflectors, vegetation removal from roadside verges, and culverts under roads. Residents of the Mt Lucas area have established a community group with the aims of protecting and rehabilitating Proserpine Rock-wallaby habitat and reducing road kills (Schaper & Nolan 2000). Roadside reflectors ('Swareflex') that produce a strip of light along the side of the road when a vehicle drives past inhibit wallabies from crossing in front of vehicles (Johnson et al. 1993; Winkel 1997b). These reflectors have been installed in places where road deaths of Proserpine Rock-wallabies occurred along Shute Harbour Road, Crystal Brook Road and Dingo Beach Road. There was a sharp reduction in the number of deaths after reflectors were installed (Johnson et al. 1993; Nolan & Johnson 2000; Winkel 1997b).

    According to Winkel (1997b), the ideal protection for the wallaby would be if dogs and cats were absent from all developments within its habitat. Because this is unlikely to occur, existing dog and cat owners need information on how to minimize contact between pets and wallabies. Fences within Proserpine Rock-wallaby habitat should be removed or modified so that dogs cannot kill wallabies by cornering them against a fence. Dogs should be restrained, and cats should be kept inside or in an outdoor enclosure. Cats should not be given raw meat, to minimise the risk of them contracting and spreading Toxoplasma (Queensland EPA 2006a).


    The Queensland EPA (2006a) recommends that residents of the Proserpine and Airlie Beach districts remove toxic plants from their gardens, and councils do not use toxic plants in urban development landscapes.

    The toxic invasive plant Pink Periwinkle is being controlled within Proserpine Rock-wallaby habitat, and Guinea Grass (which attracts the wallaby to roads) is being controlled along roadside margins (Queensland EPA 2002).

    Proserpine Rock-wallabies have been translocated to Hayman Island. Feral goats have been removed from the Island and a fire strategy has been developed, including construction and maintenance of firebreaks (Schaper & Nolan 2000).

    The following organisation has recieved Government funding for conservation and recovery work benefiting the Proserpine Rock-wallaby:

    Pioneer Intergrated Catchment Management Association Inc received $15 483 of funding through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2000–01 for the establishment of vegetation corridors to provide a food source for the Proserpine Rock-wallaby, and the extension of their habitat onto freehold land.

  • Johnson (1992) undertook studies of the distribution of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby, focusing on the Dryander, Conway and Quandong Ranges. Additional research conducted on this species includes habitat use and preference (Delaney 1993; Holloway 2001) and reproductive ecology (Johnson & Delean 1999).

    Guides to threat abatement and management strategies for the Proserpine Rock-wallaby can be found in:

  • An update of the Proserpine Rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone Recovery Plan (Nolan 1997)
  • The Proserpine Rock-wallaby (Petrogale persephone) Recovery Plan 2000–2004 (Nolan & Johnson 2000)
  • The Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes (Maxwell et al. 1996).

  • The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

    Threat Class Threatening Species References
    Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Catharanthus roseus (Pink Periwinkle, Madagascar Periwinkle) National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Canis lupus familiaris (Domestic Dog) National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Introduction of pathogens and resultant disease National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition and/or predation Canis lupus dingo (Dingo, Warrigal, New Guinea Singing Dog) An update of the proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone Recovery Plan. Australian Mammalogy. 19: 309-313. (Nolan, B.J., 1997) [Journal].
    Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Residential and Commercial Development:Residential and Commercial Development:Habitat modification (clearance and degradation) due to urban development National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low genetic diversity and genetic inbreeding National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
    Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Vehicle related mortality National recovery plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone (Department of Environment and Resource Management, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
    Recovery Plan for the Proserpine rock-wallaby Petrogale persephone 2000-2004 (Nolan, B. & P. Johnson, 2000) [State Recovery Plan].

    Batianoff, G.N. & H.A. Dillewaard (1994). Draft Botanical Summary Report of Gloucester Island National Park, Whitsunday Region, Queensland. Brisbane, Queensland Herbarium, Department of Environment and Heritage.

    Clancy, T.F. & R.L. Close (1997). The Queensland rock-wallabies - an overview of their conservation status, threats and management. Australian Mammalogy. 19: 169-174.

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    This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

    Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Petrogale persephone in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 1 Aug 2014 00:09:40 +1000.