Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National recovery plan for the Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009e) [Recovery Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Threatened flora of the Western Central Wheatbelt (Collins, J., 2009) [State Species Management Plan].
WA:Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora Largely Restricted to the Shire of Wongan-Ballidu (Stack, G., N. Willers, M. Fitzgerald & A. Brown, 2006) [State Species Management Plan].
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Critically Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list)
Scientific name Acacia pharangites [20281]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Maslin
Infraspecies author  
Reference Nuytsia 4: 33, figs 2, 3C-D (14 Oct. 1982).
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

The Wongan Gully Wattle is a spindly, open shrub to 4 m high with slightly oblong golden flower heads (Brown et al. 1998; Evans & Brown 1999; Orchard & Wilson 2001a). The phyllodes are concentrated towards the ends of branches and the stems below are pockmarked with scars of phyllodes that have died and fallen off (Brown et al. 1998; Evans & Brown 1999).

This species is restricted to the Wongan Hills area, SW WA (Brown et al. 1998). It is known from a single population, consisting of two sub populations on Mt O'Brien (TV Tower Hill). It is likely that the species still occupies its full geographic range, being naturally rare (Evans & Brown 1999). It is presumed to be a relict species (Maslin 1982).

Population details as in Evans & Brown (1999):

Population [as
numbered by
WA CALM]
LocationLand StatusYear of survey/
number of plants
Condition
1aWongan HillsPrivate Property1980 - 329
1992 - 7
1998 - 36
Undisturbed
1bWongan HillsPrivate Property1988 - 4
1992 - 4
1998 - 2
Undisturbed

This species is not known from a conservation reserve (Briggs & Leigh 1996).

This species grows mostly on the lower slopes of sheltered gullies, in rocky red-brown clay, flanking seasonally dry creeks, and also in grey sand in the creek beds themselves. This soil type, comprising of small stones derived from greenstone, is not known from elsewhere in the hills (Evans & Brown 1999).

The species forms part of a dense shrub layer to 5 m tall with Allocasuarina campestris, Calothamnus asper, Melaleuca radula and Allocasuarina acutivalvis (Maslin 1982; Evans & Brown 1999). The species is normally of scattered occurrence, only rarely forming dense stands (Maslin 1982).

The slightly oblong golden flower heads are borne Aug.-Nov. (Brown et al. 1998; Evans & Brown 1999). Mature fruits have been collected from mid-Dec. to mid-Jan. (Maslin 1982).

The species is presumed to be insect pollinated. Plants produce fruits but no seedlings have been located. It is possible that fire or another form of disturbance is required to stimulate germination (Evans & Brown 1999).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Evans, R. & A. Brown, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Evans, R. & A. Brown, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) National recovery plan for the Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009e) [Recovery Plan].
Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Evans, R. & A. Brown, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low genetic diversity and genetic inbreeding National recovery plan for the Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009e) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals National recovery plan for the Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009e) [Recovery Plan].
Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Evans, R. & A. Brown, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Poor recruitment (regeneration) and declining population numbers Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Evans, R. & A. Brown, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Population senescnce and lack of recruitment Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002 (Evans, R. & A. Brown, 1999) [State Recovery Plan].

Briggs, J.D. & J.H. Leigh (1996). Rare or Threatened Australian Plants - Revised Edition. Collingwood: CSIRO Publishing.

Brown, A., C. Thomson-Dans & N. Marchant, eds. (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Como, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Evans, R. & A. Brown (1999). Wongan Gully Wattle (Acacia pharangites) Interim Recovery Plan 1999-2002. [Online]. Wanneroo: WA CALM. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/a-pharangites/index.html.

Maslin, B.R. (1982). Studies in the genus Acacia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae) - 10. Acacia species of the Wongan Hills, Western Australia. Nuytsia. 4(1):29-46.

Orchard, A.E. & A.J.G. Wilson, eds. (2001a). Flora of Australia, Volume 11B, Mimosaceae, Acacia Part 2. In: Flora of Australia. Canberra, ACT: ABRS & CSIRO.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Acacia pharangites in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sun, 27 Jul 2014 05:41:04 +1000.