Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pseudophryne corroboree (Southern Corroboree Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2013aq) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Southern Corroboree Frog Pseudophryne corroboree and Northern Corroboree Frog Pseudophryne pengilleyi National Recovery Plan (NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH), 2012j) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat Abatement Plan for Predation, Habitat Degradation, Competition and Disease Transmission by Feral Pigs (Australian Government Department of the Environment and Heritage (AGDEH), 2005p) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Threat Abatement Plan for infection of amphibians with chytrid fungus resulting in chytridiomycosis (Commonwealth Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006o) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey Guidelines for Australia's Threatened Frogs. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.3 (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2010h) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (140) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2013h) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Threatened Species Management Information Circular No.6 - Hygiene protocol for the control of disease in frogs (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2008b) [Information Sheet].
NSW:Southern Corroboree Frog Threatened Species Information (NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NSW NPWS), 1999bw) [Information Sheet].
NSW:Predation by Gambusia holbrooki - The Plague Minnow (NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NSW NPWS), 2003i) [State Threat Abatement Plan].
NSW:Southern Corroboree Frog - profile (NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH), 2013e) [Internet].
NSW:Southern Corroboree Frog - critically endangered species listing - final determination (NSW Scientific Committee (NSW SC), 2009a) [Internet].
NSW:Review of the Threatened Species Conservation Act Schedules 2007-2009 (NSW Scientific Committee (NSW SC), 2009b) [State Species Management Plan].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Critically Endangered (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Critically Endangered (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
Scientific name Pseudophryne corroboree [1915]
Family Myobatrachidae:Anura:Amphibia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author Moore,1953
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/PDFs/tsprofile_southern_corroboree_frog.pdf

Scientific name: Pseudophryne corroboree

Common name: Southern Corroboree Frog

The Northern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne pengilleyi) was separated from the Southern Corroboree Frog due to its different appeareance and distribution (Wells & Wellington 1985) based on the work by Pengilley (e.g. Pengilley 1971, 1971a, 1973, 1992). Differences between the species' include:

  • colour-pattern and morphology (Osborne et al. 1996; Pengilley 1966, 1992), the lime-yellow and black pattern of the Northern Corroboree Frog tends to be less brilliant than that of the Southern Corroboree Frog (Cogger 2000)
  • distribution, the Northern Corroboree Frog occurs in the Brindabella Ranges (Namadgi National Park (NP), Brindabella NP), northern Koscuiszko NP and adjacent state forests, whereas the Southern Corroboree Frog occurs in central Koscuiszko NP (Osborne 1989)
  • considerable genetic divergence (Osborne & Norman 1991; Roberts & Maxson 1989)
  • skin biochemistry (Daly et al. 1990).

The Southern Corroboree Frog is distinctive and easily recognised because of its striking dorsal colour pattern consisting of bright yellow longitudinal stripes alternating with black stripes (Cogger 2000). The ventral surface is boldly marked with black and yellow and white blotches. A large flat femoral gland is present on each hind limb, and the inner metatarsal tubercle is low and round. Adults reach a length of between 25–30 mm (Barker et al. 1995). Tadpoles are dark in colour and have a long paddle shaped tail that grows to 30 mm in total length (Anstis 2002).

The Southern Corroboree Frog is restricted to the Jagungal Wilderness area in New South Wales in the north-west of its former range (Hunter 2002 pers. comm.). It is now extinct or in very reduced numbers at previous locations, particularly Pretty Plain, Happy Jacks Plain, Finns Swamp, Whites River and the Smiggin Holes and the Guthega area south of the Snowy River (NSW NPWS 2001q). Its extent of occurrence has declined by 90% to 60 km² with an area of occupancy of 0.8 km² (Hunter 2013b).

The species historically occurred more broadly in sub-alpine areas within Koscuiszko National Park from Smiggin Holes in the south, northwards to the Maragle Range about 5 km west of Cabramurra (NSW NPWS 2001q), which constituted a north-south linear range of 51 km. Near Mt Jagungal, the species had a 24 km east-west range (Osbourne 1989).

Prior to a detailed survey undertaken in 1986–1987 (Osborne 1989) there were museum records of the Southern Corroboree Frog from only seven locations, all in the Snowy Mountains (Guthega, Smiggin Holes, Happy Jacks Plain, Round Mountain, Alpine Hut, Pretty Plain and Tooma Swamp) (Osborne et al. 1999). Osborne (1989) surveyed 257 potential breeding sites in the Snowy Mountains and recorded the species at 63 locations, although he was unable to find the species at the formerly recorded locations near Guthega and Alpine Hut. Extensive surveys in 1997–1999 found the frog present at 79 sites of 213 survey locations (Hunter 2000; NSW NPWS 2001q).

Extensive surveys occurred in 1986–1987 (Osborne 1989) and 1997–1999 (Hunter 2000). Monitoring occurred in the 2000s (Hunter 2013b).

Of the 60 sites surveyed between 1986–87, only two were found to still have frogs in 2013 (Hunter 2013b). The total population estimate in 2012 was eight adults and, in 2013, four adults (Hunter 2013b; TSSC 2013aq).

A monitoring program has been conducted since 1986, in which 23 sites have been surveyed annually. The abundance of male frogs at the monitoring sites declined by over 80% across the first two years of this program. This was followed by a more gradual decline through to 1998, by which time 19 of the 23 monitoring sites had become locally extinct (Osborne et al. 1999). To compensate for the loss of sites with frogs and to address management and research actions, an additional 37 extant populations were incorporated into the annual monitoring program in 1999. In 1998, the largest population had 95 adult males (NSW NPWS 2001q). Over the following four years, the abundance of frogs at these sites dropped by 75%, with 25% of the sites becoming locally extinct (Hunter 2002 pers. comm.). In the January 2002 breeding season, the largest populations contained only 12 calling males with the total number of males remaining across the species distribution estimated to be fewer than 150 individuals (Hunter 2002 pers. comm.). A low degree of genetic diversity among populations of Southern Corroboree Frogs suggests a recent genetic bottleneck event (Osborne & Norman 1991).

All populations occur in Kosciuszko National Park and there is also an ex situ population (Hunter et al. 2009).

The Southern Corroboree Frogs is a habitat specialist, restricted to gently sloping montane and sub-alpine habitats between 1300–1760 m above sea level. The species utilises two distinct habitat types: a breeding season habitat associated with pools and seepages in sphagnum bogs, wet tussock grasslands and wet heath usually occurring on granitic and volcanic substrates; and a terrestrial non-breeding habitat in forest, sub-alpine woodland and tall heath adjacent to the breeding area. During the summer, the adult frogs breed in shallow pools and seepages within the breeding area, before returning to the adjacent woodland and tall moist heath at the end of the breeding season (Pengilley 1966). Osborne (1988) found that, following breeding, adults are capable of dispersing over 300 m into the surrounding woodland.

Vegetation at breeding sites varies considerably and consists of spreading rope-rush Empodisma minus, peat moss Sphagnum cristatum, and the shrubs Baeckea gunniana and Epacris paludosa. Several other plant species, including sod-tussock grasses Poa spp., candle heath Richea continentis, the rush Restio australis and the sedge Carex gaudichaudianacommonly occur at breeding sites. The breeding pools are characteristically shallow (often ephemeral), and have relatively large surface areas, low water flow rates, and have a long duration (Osborne 1990b). This allows the water in the preferred pools to become warmer during the day, possibly enhancing tadpole development. The breeding pools are the most sensitive feature of the breeding habitat of the Southern Corroboree Frog and protection of the catchment area of the pools and seepages is essential for their long-term persistence as breeding sites.

Litter, logs and dense ground cover in the understorey of snow gum woodland provides over-wintering habitat (Pengilley 1966). Plant species typical of this habitat include Bossiaea foliosa, Prostanthera cuneata, Oxylobium spp. and Phebalium spp. Very little is known about non-breeding habitats utilised by this species (Osborne 1990b).

Very little is known about the life-history of the frogs after they leave the pools as juveniles (NSW NPWS 2001q). A skeleto-chronological study (counting growth rings in bone cross-sections) indicated that after metamorphosis males take 3–4 years to reach sexual maturity and females take 4–5 years. Frogs may live up to nine years as a breeding adult (Hunter 2000).
Adult males move into the breeding areas in early summer and call during January and February from small chambers in vegetation at the edges of breeding pools (Hunter 2000; Osborne 1990b). Females only enter the bogs briefly to lay their eggs in terrestrial nests, then leave the breeding site (Osborne 1990b). Eggs are laid in small clutches of 16–38 eggs (Pengilley 1973). Tadpoles develop to an advanced state within the egg capsule then enter diapause, awaiting flooding of the nest to trigger hatching (Osborne 1990b). Hatching is thought to occur during autumn and winter during periods of high rainfall or snow melt. At the end of winter, when snow has melted from the breeding sites, tadpoles continue growing slowly until metamorphosis in early summer (NSW NPWS 2001q). Tadpoles are known to occur in long lasting pools in bog areas. Preferred pools are generally warmer than unused pools with a greater surface area (Osborne 1990b).

The diet of juveniles and adults consists largely of small ants and, to a lesser extent, other invertebrates. Food intake is greatly reduced during winter, with many individuals apparently not feeding (Pengilley 1966, 1971).

The daily and seasonal patterns of movement of the Southern Corroboree are largely unknown. It is known that the species moves between its distinct breeding and non-breeding habitats. Some information is available on the seasonal movements of the closely related species P. pengilleyi (Pengilley 1966). Following breeding, adults are capable of dispersing over 300 m into surrounding woodland (Osborne 1988).

The Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened frogs (DEWHA 2010h) includes survey design principles when planning a frogsurvey and includes recommendations for survey methods for the Southern Corroboree Frog (DEWHA 2010h). The following information is additional to the guidelines.

Call surveys should be conducted during January and February (Ehmann 1996b; Hunter 2000; Osborne 1989; Pengilley 1973). Call playback (using a tape recorder) is an effective technique for stimulating a response from male frogs. A version of this technique has been developed for corroboree frogs. Males of these species respond to loud shouting from the observer (Hunter 2000; Osborne 1989). A single observer is sufficient for call stimulation surveys, and in the case of using human vocalisations. The technique is most reliable in the last two weeks of January (Hunter 2000), however, it may be unreliable for the two days following heavy rain (Hunter 2013).

The Southern Coroboree Frog is one of a number of Australian alpine amphibian species, including Alpine Tree Frog (Litoria verreauxii alpina), Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) and Baw Baw Frog (Philoria frosti), which have experienced pronounced population declines for unknown reasons. It is likely that declines will continue through the 2010s (Hunter 2013). There is no single aspect of the field biology of these species which stands out as a feature in common that may help explain the declines (Osborne et al. 1999). Osborne and colleagues (1999) reviewed some of the possible factors contributing to population declines at high altitudes including long term weather patterns and pathogens such as the Chytrid fungus (Berger et al. 1999).

Chytridiomycosis affects the Southern Corroboree Frog throughout its range (Hunter et al. 2010). This highly virulent fungal pathogen of amphibians is capable at the minimum of causing sporadic deaths in some populations, and 100 per cent mortality in other populations (AGDEH 2006o). Chytrid fungus has been detected in some museum specimens of the species (Osborne 2001 pers. comm.). The spread of this diease is possibly facilitated by the Common Eastern Froglet (Crinia signifera) (Hunter et al. 2009).

Climate change is predicted to decrease winter and spring precipitation for the Australian Alps (Hennessey et al. 2003) that may lower spring water tables and result in pools drying earlier (Hunter 2013). Although droughts are a common in south-east Australia, climate change may increase the severity and frequency of these events (Hunter 2013).

Planting of exotic trees, such as Willows (Salix spp.), has been widespread in the Snowy Mountains. Although no breeding sites are directly threatened by willow invasion, in the longer-term the spread of willows by vegetative growth along seepages and streams may present a problem for the management of some sites (Osborne 1990b). Excavation by feral pigs has also been identified as a potentially threatening process (Osborne 1990b; Osborne 2001 pers. comm.).

The Pig (Sus scrofa), the Horse (Equus equus), the Sambar Deer (Cervus unicolour) and the Fallow Deer (Dama dama) have been observed damaging habitat. Ultimately, trampling and grazing by these species cause wetland incision that alters drainage patterns and vegetation structure (Costin et al. 1959; Hunter 2013; McDougall 1989; Whinam & Chilcott 2002).

Facilitating the recovery of the Southern Corroboree Frog will require assisting this species to attain greater resistance to Chytridiomycosis at the population level. The National Threat Abatement Plan for Chytridiomycosis recommends implementing a captive breeding and reintroduction program for achieving greater resistance in frog populations threatened with extinction, because maintaining the species in the wild will facilitate ongoing selection for increased resistance (AGDEH 2006o). A captive breeding and reintroduction program is currently being undertaken using individuals that have been bred at the Amphibian Research Centre, Taronga Zoo, Melbourne Zoo, and Healseville Sanctuary. Furthermore, research investigating the immune response of the Southern Corroboree Frog to the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus is currently being undertaken at James Cook University and Taronga Zoo. The reintroduction of tadpoles into artificial pools that remain free from Amphibian Chytrid Fungus infection is currently being trialed as a technique to successfully establish wild popultions (Hunter et al. 2009).

The NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service is undertaking an effective feral animals control program throughout the range of the Southern Corroboree Frog. This program has involved a range of actions including aerial shooting of pigs, and trapping of horses. This program has successfully mitigated any significant impacts from feral herbivores on the Southern Corroboree Frog. The Southern Corroboree Frog and Northern Corroboree Frog National Recovery Plan (NSW OEH 2012j) evaluates the implementation of the 2001 national recovery plan (NSW NPWS 2001q). Key actions that have been undertaken include (NSW OEH 2012j):

  • annual monitoring
  • various research projects
  • development and implementation of effective captive breeding protocols.

Research was commenced in 1997 at the Amphibian Research Centre (ARC), Melbourne, which examined the potential role of captive husbandry in aiding the recovery of small populations. Studies were aimed at reducing egg and frog mortality. An intial assessment compared the level of survivorship to the metamorphis stage of captive-reared and field embryos and tadpoles (Hunter et al. 1999).

Management plans for the Southern Corroboree Frog are at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat loss and modification due to clearance of native vegetation and pasture improvements Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate change altering atmosphere/hydrosphere temperatures, rainfall patterns and/or frequency of severe weather events Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate Change and Severe Weather:Reduced rainfall caused by climate change Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat modification with associated erosion Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Recreational Activities:Disturbance, especially from human recreational activities and development Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Juncus effusus (Rush) Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Mimulus moschatus (Monkey Musk, Musk Monkey-flower) Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Mentha spicata (Spearmint) Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Salix spp. except S.babylonica, S.x calodendron & S.x reichardtii (Willows except Weeping Willow, Pussy Willow and Sterile Pussy Willow) Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
The conservation biology of Pseudophryne corroboree Moore (Anura: Myobatrachidae): a study of insular populations Ph.D. Thesis. (Osborne, W.S., 1990b) [Ph.D. Thesis].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Equus caballus (Horse) The threat posed by pest animals to biodiversity in New South Wales (Coutts-Smith, A.J., P.S. Mahon, M. Letnic & P.O. Downey, 2007) [Management Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Sus scrofa (Pig) The threat posed by pest animals to biodiversity in New South Wales (Coutts-Smith, A.J., P.S. Mahon, M. Letnic & P.O. Downey, 2007) [Management Plan].
Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
The conservation biology of Pseudophryne corroboree Moore (Anura: Myobatrachidae): a study of insular populations Ph.D. Thesis. (Osborne, W.S., 1990b) [Ph.D. Thesis].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Predation, Habitat Degradation, Competition and Disease Transmission by Feral Pigs (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2001ab) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Infection by parasites Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Negative impacts caused by insects Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, grazing, predation and/or habitat degradation by rats Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Predation by reptiles Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Changes in hydrology including habitat drainage Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
The biology and management of the Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) in NSW. Species Management Report No. 8. (Osborne, W.S., 1991) [Report].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Changes to hydrology due to water diversion Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Changes to hydrology including construction of dams/barriers Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].
Uncategorised:Uncategorised:threats not specified Recovery Plan for the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) (NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, 2001q) [State Recovery Plan].

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Ehmann, H. (1996b). Corroboree Frog, Pseudophryne corroboree. In: Ehmann, H., ed. Threatened Frogs of New South Wales: Habitats, Status and Conservation. Page(s) 145-148. Frog and Tadpole Study Group of NSW Inc, Sydney South, Australia.

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Hunter, D. (2013b). Southern Corroboree Frog - Species Information Sheet. Provided to the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. NSW Office of Environment and Heritage.

Hunter, D., R. Pietsch, G. Marantelli, M. McFadden & P. Harlow (2009). Field research, recovery actions and recommendations for the southern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) recovery program: 2007-2009. Report to the Murray Catchment Management Authority.

Hunter, D., W. Osborne, G. Marantelli & K. Green (1999). Implementation of a population augmentation project for remnant populations of the Southern Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree). In: A. Campbell, ed. Declines and Disappearances of Australian Frogs. Page(s) 158-167. Environment Australia, Canberra.

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Pengilley, R.K. (1966). The biology of the genus Pseudophryne (Anura: Leptodactylidae). M.Sc. Thesis. Canberra: Australian National University.

Roberts, J.D. & L.R. Maxson (1989). A Molecular Perspective on Relationships of Australian Pseudophryne (Anura: Myobatrachidae) . Systematic Biology. 38(2):154-165.

Speare, R & L. Berger (2000). Chytridiomycosis in amphibians in Australia. [Online]. Townsville, Queensland: Rainforest CRC & School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, James Cook University. Available from: http://www.jcu.edu.au/school/phtm/PHTM/frogs/chyspec.htm.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2013aq). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pseudophryne corroboree (Southern Corroboree Frog). [Online]. Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Canberra, ACT: Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/1915-listing-advice.pdf.

Wells R.W. & C.R. Wellington (1985). A Classification of the Amphibia and Reptilia of Australia. Australian Journal of Herpetology Supplementary Series. 1:1-61.

Whinam, J. & N. Chilcott (2002). Floristic description and environmental relationships of Sphagnum communities in NSW and the ACT and their conservation managment. Cunninghamia. 7:463-500.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Pseudophryne corroboree in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Wed, 27 Aug 2014 20:27:47 +1000.