Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Recovery plan for Stream Frogs of South-east Queensland 2001–2005 (Hines, H.B. & South-east Queensland Threatened Frogs Recovery Team (SEQTFRT), 2002) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat Abatement Plan for Predation, Habitat Degradation, Competition and Disease Transmission by Feral Pigs (Australian Government Department of the Environment and Heritage (AGDEH), 2005p) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Threat Abatement Plan for infection of amphibians with chytrid fungus resulting in chytridiomycosis (Commonwealth Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006o) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey Guidelines for Australia's Threatened Frogs. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.3 (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2010h) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (126) (20/12/2011) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2011) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Endangered (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Critically Endangered (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
Scientific name Taudactylus pleione [1889]
Family Myobatrachidae:Anura:Amphibia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author Czechura, 1986
Infraspecies author  
Reference Czechura, G.V. 1986. A new species of Taudactylus (Myobatrachidae) from southeastern Queensland, Australia. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum 22(2): 299-307 [299, figs 1,4, pl. 1].
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://geoffthompson.net/art/bw/taudactylus_pleione.html

Scientific name: Taudactylus pleione

Common name: Kroombit Tinker Frog or Pleione's Torrent Frog

The Kroombit Tinker Frog is a grey coloured frog growing to 25 mm. It has darker grey flecks, spots and blotches, roughly in a uniform width between the eyes. There is an X-shaped patch between the shoulders and a large patch above each groin. There is a broad blackish streak from the snout to the forelimb, dark cross-bars on limbs and digits, yellowish hind side of thighs, barred with brown specks and rounded snout (Cogger 2000).

The distribution of the Kroombit Tinker Frog is extremely restricted. The species is only known from twelve small (up to 25 ha) unconnected patches of rainforest above 500 m at Kroombit Tops, south-west of Gladstone, Queensland (Clarke et al. 1999; Clarke 2001, pers. comm.). It is believed that the species is a relict species, restricted to Kroombit Tops through habitat fragmentation that disrupted rainforest connections between southern and north-east Queensland (Czechura 1986a). Within the rainforest patches, populations of the Kroombit Tinker Frog are clumped around drainage lines and seepage areas. The occupied patches are estimated to be scattered within an area of 700 ha (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.).

The total area of occupancy for the Kroombit Tinker Frog is approximately 120 ha (Hines & SEQTFRT 2002).

It is estimated that there are less than 150 Kroombit Tinker Frog's in a series of small unconnected rainforest patches (Qld Regional NRM Groups' Collective 2013). Surveys in February 1997 and regular surveys since 1998 have greatly expanded the known distribution of the Kroombit Tinker Frog. The species is now known to occur in nine rainforest patches in Kroombit Tops National Park in the headwaters of Degalgil and Diglum Creeks in the Boyne River catchment and in three patches in Kroombit Forest Reserve on separate drainage lines in the headwaters of Kroombit Creek (Clarke et al. 1999; Clarke 2001, pers. comm.; Hines & SEQTFRT 2002). All potential sites on the Kroombit Tableland and escarpment have been searched at least once during the calling season although additional potential habitat for the species exists on the Dawes Range and Mt Roberts (Cunningham 2001, pers. comm.).

The only regularly monitored population, in the head of Kroombit Creek, appears to have declined (Hines et al. 1999). The species was regularly encountered at this site prior to 1997 but the species was not heard or seen at this site during the 1997/98 season despite systematic monitoring (Clarke et al. 1999). Data from recent annual searches also indicate a decline in numbers of Kroombit Tinker Frog on Kroombit Plateau (Meyer 2002, pers. comm.). During 1997/98 little other monitoring work was undertaken in the area but the species was heard calling at three recently discovered sites (Hines et al. 1999). Estimates of population size are highly conjectural with no more than 13 individuals being recorded from one site at any one time, and only three females have ever been recorded (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.). No information is available on population structure or genetic variation (Hines et al. 1999).

The Kroombit Frog is known from Kroombit Tops National Park and Kroombit Forest Reserve (formerly Kroombit Tops State Forest Scientific Area No. 48) (Clarke et al. 1999).

The Kroombit Frog is known from Kroombit Tops National Park and Kroombit Forest Reserve (formerly Kroombit Tops State Forest Scientific Area No. 48) (Clarke et al. 1999).

The Kroombit Tinker Frog is highly cryptic and is mainly associated with Piccabeen Palm (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana) rainforest and boulder scree gullies (Clarke et al. 1999; Czechura 1986a; Meyer et al. 2001). The species is found around rocky shelves and boulders, under rocks or in deep rock piles near temporary stream lines, seepage zones and in sheltered rocky scree (Clarke et al. 1999). Most sites have little or no surface water (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.). Unlike other species of Taudactylus, the Kroombit Tinker Frog has never been observed basking (Czechura 1986b).

Important habitat for this species has been identified as rainforest patches over 500 m in altitude in Kroombit Tops (Kroombit Tops National Park and Kroombit Forest Reserve) (Hines & SEQTFRT 2002).

Only three gravid female Kroombit Tinker Frogs have ever been found: one (the holotype) in early February, another in mid-January and a third (partly gravid) in early December (Clarke et al. 1999; Meyer 2002, pers. comm.). Large unpigmented eggs were visible through the abdominal wall of specimens found in late January and December (Meyer et al. 2001). Eggs, tadpoles and oviposition sites have not been observed (Clarke et al. 1999). It is suspected that this species breeds in seepage areas amongst rock piles, and that tadpoles remain well hidden (Meyer 2002, pers. comm.).

Feeding behaviors have not been reported for this species, however males have been observed moving about, possibly searching for prey, after cessation of calling (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.).

The Kroombit Tinker Frog has not been observed between April and August and is presumed to retreat into deep cracks and bolder piles (Cunningham 2001, pers. comm.). In summer when the frogs are active, individuals may be found in leaf-litter or under stones along water courses where ephemeral pools and soaks form (Czechura 1986a). In the height of the breeding season individuals are increasingly found away from obvious rock refuges and can be found under small stones, palm fronds, surface debris and leaf-litter alongside both permanent and temporary streams (Czechura 1986b). The species is regularly found away from watercourses where seepages are common (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.).

The methods that have successfully been used in the past to survey the Kroombit Tinker Frog are visual encounter surveys and call surveys (UC 2003).

Call surveys should be conducted during the known calling period of the Kroombit Tinker Frog, between September and March (Ingram 1980). Activity seems to be initiated by the first heavy falls of rain during the spring-summer period (Czechura 1986a). Calling peaks on warm, wet nights from September to February. (Clarke et al. 1999; Clarke 2001, pers. comm.). Calling is usually most intense at dusk and early evening (Borsboom et al. 1997; Clarke et al. 1999; Czechura 1986a) although the species will call all night and all day if conditions are suitable (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.). It has been observed that the Kroombit Tinker Frog ceases calling during periods of heavy rain (QLD EPA 2005). The males call partially or completely concealed in rock crevices or under leaf litter, and often exhibit territorial behaviour by segregating themselves along the stream (Czechura 1986a), although the Kroombit Tinker Frog is frequently recorded away from streams or seepages (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.).

Effective sampling should be targeted towards sites and periods when the species will be most likely to be detected. It has been noted that there can also be dramatic variation in activity between quite closely spaced sites and the surveyor should be aware of this. In particular, the Kroombit Tinker Frog has been recorded calling quite strongly at one stream, but inactive at an occupied stream only 1 km away (QLD EPA 2005).

The apparent low population, isolation and extremely restricted distribution of the species make it highly susceptible to demographic instability, disturbance and extinction. Clarke et al. (1999) and Borsboom et al. (1998) list five main potential threats to the species: wildfire, domestic and feral animals, unknown agent(s) responsible for declines of other Queensland frogs, visitor pressure and timber harvesting.

Timber harvesting has ceased in the catchments above all known populations (Hines et al. 1999), but may be a threat to any new populations on leasehold land. Visitor numbers are low at present, but increased visitation may disrupt breeding or impact on habitat. A high intensity wildfire in 1994 burned into many rainforest patches used by the species (Hines et al. 1999). A later flood altered stream hydrology and removed leaf litter in the area (Clarke et al. 1999). The wildfire may be partially responsible for the decline of the species at the monitoring site. Modified fire management procedures have now been put in place to reduce the risk of further high intensity fires (Hines et al. 1999).

Four species of Taudactylus from similar habitat elsewhere in Queensland have also declined dramatically or disappeared due to unknown causes (Ingram & McDonald 1993). In May 1998, several dead L. pearsoniana were found at Kroombit Tops (Hines & Clarke unpubl. data). Chytrid fungus, a disease found by Berger et al. (1998) to be associated with frog deaths and declines elsewhere in Australia and Central America, was isolated from these animals (Berger unpubl. data). This, in conjunction with the apparent decline of the Kroombit Tinker Frog at the monitoring site has heightened concern for this species. Clarke et al. (1999) and Borsboom et al. (1998) list domestic cattle, horses and feral pigs as potential threats to the species. Stock pose a threat to the Kroombit Tinker Frog mainly through the destruction of habitat and fouling of water (Clarke et al. 1999). A fence has been constructed to exclude stock, but impacts at the head of Kroombit Creek continue.

At Kroombit Tops, feral pigs have only recently arrived but they have caused significant damage to at least two sites known to support the Kroombit Tinker Frog. Although there may be direct predation by pigs, the greatest effect is likely to be the impact of increased silt on embryos and tadpoles. Streams in the area now carry heavy silt loads. Silt reduces the availability of food for tadpoles and reduces their fitness at metamorphosis. Soil disturbance by pigs is also likely to greatly increase the spread of riparian weeds such as mistflower and crofton weed (Hines & SEQTFRT 2002). Feral pigs are also potential vectors of chytrid fungus (Clarke 2001, pers. comm.).

Chytridiomycosis is an infectious disease affecting amphibians worldwide. The disease has been recorded in four regions of Australia, namely the east coast, south-west Western Australia, Adelaide, and more recently Tasmania. This highly virulent fungal pathogen of amphibians is capable at the minimum of causing sporadic deaths in some populations, and 100 per cent mortality in other populations (DEH 2006).

Actions undertaken

The Fitzroy Basin Assocaition in partnership with the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Services through the Queensland Government Q2 Coasts and Country funding has continued the implementation of a fire strategy and feral animal control program (Kroombit Tops Pest Rea Project). Undertaken actions that were reported in 2013 include (Queensland Regional NRM Groups' Collective 2013):

  • a week long amphibian survey
  • Song Meter audio monitoring of populations and the effectiveness of fire and pest animal control. 

National recovery plan

The Recovery Plan for Stream Frogs of South-east Queensland 2001-2005 (Hines & SEQTFRT 2002) identifies the following recovery objectives and actions for several frog species, including the Kroombit Tinker Frog.

Overall objective

To significantly improve the conservation status and long term survival of each species through protection of its habitat, and through location of additional populations or expansion of existing populations into areas currently uninhabited.

Specific objectives (2001-2005)

  • To downlist the cascade treefrog from endangered to vulnerable within five years based on IUCN (2001) criteria of population size and trends, extent of occurrence and probability of extinction.
  • To determine whether the southern gastric-brooding frog and the southern dayfrog are extant.
  • To secure existing populations of extant species.
  • To investigate disease as a key threatening process.
  • To increase the number of populations of extant species by facilitating expansion into their former range.

Recovery actions

  • Action 1. Manage the recovery process
  • Action 2. Monitor populations
  • Action 3. Gain information required for management
  • Action 4. Protect populations and manage habitat
  • Action 5. Provide education and information

The Recovery Plan for Stream Frogs of South-east Queensland 2001-2005 has been prepared to guide recovery actions and objectives (Hines & SEQTFRT 2002).

The Department of the Environment and Heritage has developed a threat abatement plan which aims to :

  • Prevent amphibian populations or regions that are currently chytridiomycosis-free from becoming infected by preventing further spread of the amphibian chytrid within Australia,
  • Decrease the impact of infection with the amphibian chytrid fungus on populations that are currently infected.

The Threat Abatement Plan for infection of amphibians with chytrid fungus resulting in chytridiomycosis can be found at http://www.deh.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/chytrid/index.html

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes The recovery process for the Kroombit tinkerfrog, Taudactylus pleione. In: B.R. Boyes, ed. Rainforest Recovery for the New Millennium. WWF 1998 SE Qld Rainforest Recovery Conference. Page(s) 109-123. (Clarke, J.M., A.C. Borsboom, M. Cunningham & H. Hines, 1999) [Proceedings].
Biological Resource Use:Logging and Wood Harvesting:Habitat disturbance due to foresty activities The recovery process for the Kroombit tinkerfrog, Taudactylus pleione. In: B.R. Boyes, ed. Rainforest Recovery for the New Millennium. WWF 1998 SE Qld Rainforest Recovery Conference. Page(s) 109-123. (Clarke, J.M., A.C. Borsboom, M. Cunningham & H. Hines, 1999) [Proceedings].
Biological Resource Use:Logging and Wood Harvesting:Habitat loss, modification and degradation due to timber harvesting Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human induced disturbance due to unspecified activities Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Chytridiomycosis disease Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (chytrid fungus) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Ageratina riparia (Mistflower, Mist Flower, Creeping Croftonweed, River Eupatorium, Spreading Mistflower) Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Ageratina adenophora (Crofton Weed, Catweed, Hemp Agrimony, Mexican Devil, Sticky Agrimony, Sticky Eupatorium) Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Lantana camara (Lantana, Common Lantana, Kamara Lantana, Large-leaf Lantana, Pink Flowered Lantana, Red Flowered Lantana, Red-Flowered Sage, White Sage, Wild Sage) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Rhinella marina (Cane Toad) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Equus caballus (Horse) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Sus scrofa (Pig) The recovery process for the Kroombit tinkerfrog, Taudactylus pleione. In: B.R. Boyes, ed. Rainforest Recovery for the New Millennium. WWF 1998 SE Qld Rainforest Recovery Conference. Page(s) 109-123. (Clarke, J.M., A.C. Borsboom, M. Cunningham & H. Hines, 1999) [Proceedings].
Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Recovery plan for Stream Frogs of South-east Queensland 2001–2005 (Hines, H.B. & South-east Queensland Threatened Frogs Recovery Team (SEQTFRT), 2002) [Recovery Plan].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Bos taurus (Domestic Cattle) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Chytridiomycosis causes amphibian mortality associated with population declines in the rainforest of Australia and Central America. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science USA. 95:9031-9036. (Berger, L., R. Speare, P. Daszak, D.E. Green, A.A. Cunningham, C.L. Goggin, R. Slocombe, M.A. Ragan, A.D. Hyatt, K.R. McDonald, H.B. Hines, K.R. Lips, G. Marrantelli & H. Parkes, 1998) [Proceedings].
Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, grazing, predation and/or habitat degradation by rats Species threats data recorded on the SPRAT database between 1999-2002 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2012i) [Database].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Alteration of hydrological regimes including flooding The recovery process for the Kroombit tinkerfrog, Taudactylus pleione. In: B.R. Boyes, ed. Rainforest Recovery for the New Millennium. WWF 1998 SE Qld Rainforest Recovery Conference. Page(s) 109-123. (Clarke, J.M., A.C. Borsboom, M. Cunningham & H. Hines, 1999) [Proceedings].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) The recovery process for the Kroombit tinkerfrog, Taudactylus pleione. In: B.R. Boyes, ed. Rainforest Recovery for the New Millennium. WWF 1998 SE Qld Rainforest Recovery Conference. Page(s) 109-123. (Clarke, J.M., A.C. Borsboom, M. Cunningham & H. Hines, 1999) [Proceedings].
Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes An assessment of frog declines in wet subtropical Australia. In: Campbell, A., ed. Declines and Disappearances of Australian Frogs. Page(s) 44-63. (Hines, H., M. Mahony & K. McDonald, 1999) [Book].
Pollution:Pollution:Changes to water and sediment flows leading to erosion, siltation and pollution Commonwealth Listing Advice on Taudactylus pleione (Kroombit Tinker Frog) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012a) [Listing Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals The recovery process for the Kroombit tinkerfrog, Taudactylus pleione. In: B.R. Boyes, ed. Rainforest Recovery for the New Millennium. WWF 1998 SE Qld Rainforest Recovery Conference. Page(s) 109-123. (Clarke, J.M., A.C. Borsboom, M. Cunningham & H. Hines, 1999) [Proceedings].
Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006vj) [Internet].

Berger, L., R. Speare, P. Daszak, D.E. Green, A.A. Cunningham, C.L. Goggin, R. Slocombe, M.A. Ragan, A.D. Hyatt, K.R. McDonald, H.B. Hines, K.R. Lips, G. Marrantelli & H. Parkes (1998). Chytridiomycosis causes amphibian mortality associated with population declines in the rainforest of Australia and Central America. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science USA. 95:9031-9036.

Borsboom, A., J. Clarke & M. Cunningham (1998). Draft recovery plan for the Kroombit tinker frog Taudactylus pleione 1997-2001. Qld Dept Nat. Res. & Qld Dept Env.

Clarke, J. (2001). Personal Communication.

Clarke, J.M., A.C. Borsboom, M. Cunningham & H. Hines (1999). The recovery process for the Kroombit tinkerfrog, Taudactylus pleione. In: B.R. Boyes, ed. Rainforest Recovery for the New Millennium. WWF 1998 SE Qld Rainforest Recovery Conference. Page(s) 109-123. WWF, Sydney.

Cogger, H.G. (2000). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia - 6th edition. Sydney, NSW: Reed New Holland.

Commonwealth Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH) (2006o). Threat Abatement Plan for infection of amphibians with chytrid fungus resulting in chytridiomycosis. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/chytrid.html.

Cunningham, M. (2001). Personal communication.

Czechura, G.V. (1986a). A new species of Taudactylus (Myobatrachidae) from southeastern Queensland, Australia. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum. 22:299-307.

Czechura, G.V. (1986b). Kroombit Tops torrent frog Taudactylus pleione, with a key to the species of Taudactylus. Queensland Naturalist. 27:68-71.

Hines, H., M. Mahony & K. McDonald (1999). An assessment of frog declines in wet subtropical Australia. In: Campbell, A., ed. Declines and Disappearances of Australian Frogs. Page(s) 44-63. [Online]. Canberra: Environment Australia. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/frogs.html.

Hines, H.B. & South-east Queensland Threatened Frogs Recovery Team (SEQTFRT) (2002). Recovery plan for Stream Frogs of South-east Queensland 2001–2005. [Online]. Report to Environment Australia, Canberra. Brisbane, Queensland: Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/stream-frogs/index.html.

Ingram, G. (1980). A new frog of the genus Taudactylus (Myobatrachidae) from mid-eastern Queenlsand with notes on the other species of the genus. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum. 20:111-119.

Ingram, G.J. & K.R. McDonald (1993). An update on the decline of Queenslands frogs. In: Lunney, D. & D. Ayers, eds. Herpetology in Australia: a diverse discipline. Page(s) 297-303. Sydney, NSW: Royal Zoological Society of NSW.

Meyer, E. (2002). Personal Communication.

Meyer, E., H. Hines & J-M. Hero (2001e). Kroombit Tinker-Frog, Taudactylus pleione. In: Wet Forest Frogs of South-east Queensland. Page(s) 38-39. Griffith Uni., Gold Coast.

Queensland Environmental Protection Agency (Qld EPA) (2005). Comments on Survey Standards for Australian Frogs, an unpublished report prepared by the Applied Ecology Research Group, University of Canberra.

Queensland Regional NRM Groups' Collective (2013). One hop away from extinction. [Online]. Available from: http://www.rgc.org.au/one-hop-away-from-extinction/?utm_source=Queensland+Regional+NRM+Group%27s+Collective&utm_campaign=c7db4b4da5-Queensland_s_NRM_Rumble_October_201210_22_2012&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_23f30f7312-c7db4b4da5-5943885#more-901.

University of Canberra (UC) - Applied Ecology Research Group (2003). Survey Standards for Australian Frogs. Canberra, Australia.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Taudactylus pleione in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:25:18 +1000.