Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered as Beyeria lepidopetala
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Beyeria lepidopetala (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008adx) [Conservation Advice].
 
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Beyeria lepidopetala (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aec) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan] as Beyeria lepidopetala.
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Beyeria lepidopetala.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Declared Rare or Poorly Known Flora in the Geraldton District (Patrick, S.J., 2001) [State Species Management Plan].
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Vulnerable (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list) as Beyeria lepidopetala
Scientific name Beyeria lepidopetala [18362]
Family Euphorbiaceae:Euphorbiales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author F.Muell.
Infraspecies author  
Reference Mueller, F.J.H. von (1859) Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae 1: 230
Other names Beyeriopsis lepidopetala [54910]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/photo?f=185&level=s&id=4599

The current conservation status of the Small-petalled Beyeria, Beyeria lepidopetala, under Australian and State legislation, is as follows:

National: Listed as Endangered under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Western Australia: Listed as vulnerable under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act 1950.

Scientific: Beyeria lepidopetala

Common Name: Small-petalled Beyeria, Short-petalled Beyeria

The species is conventionally accepted as Beyeria lepidopetala.

The Small-petalled Beyeria is an erect, open shrub, ranging from 0.25–1.7 m in height, with separate male and female flowers. The flowers are green to yellowish and the flowering period is from July to August. The fruit is a three-celled oval capsule which contains three seeds and is approximately 6 mm long (Leigh et al. 1984; Patrick 2001).

The Small-petalled Beyeria is endemic to Western Australia where it is known from three specific populations in the Kalbarri–Murchison area, approximately 600 km north of Perth. One population was recorded from within Kalbarri National Park, the remaining two populations occur in a private conservation reserve. The Kalbarri National Park population has not been recorded since 1994.

The extent of occurrence for Small-petalled Beyeria has been estimated to be 95 km² (CALM 2006a), which is considered to be a restricted geographic distribution.

The Short-petalled Beyeria had not been collected for 120 years and was presumed extinct (Hopper et al. 1990; Leigh et al. 1984; Meredith & Richardson 1990; O'Donaghue & Riley 1992). The species was re-discovered in 1994 in Kalbarri National Park and noted as 'locally common'. Subsequent surveys in 1995, 1996, 1998 and 2003 by CALM (Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management; now Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC)) failed to locate the species at this site.

Two subsequent populations were discovered in a private conservation reserve in 2004, in effect providing a net increase in total population numbers. When surveyed in 2005 there were a total of 220 mature individuals in these two populations (TSSC 2008aec).

The two extant populations of the species are 55 km apart. The original Kalbarri National Park population of Small-petalled Beyeria has yielded no specimens subsequent to its discovery in 1994 (TSSC 2008aec).

While the generation length of the species is unknown, it is suspected that it may be a relatively short-lived disturbance opportunist and may naturally experience large population fluctuations. These traits have been observed in other Beyeria species (TSSC 2008aec).

The Small-petalled Beyeria is known from Kalbarri National Park and a private conservation reserve, in Western Australia (TSSC 2008aec).

The Small-petalled Beyeria has been found growing in varied habitats such as yellow sandy clay in a gully in low heath, in turn situated in an area of open mallee woodland regenerating after fire, and low regenerating heath on a limestone ridge above a gully (Patrick 2001). The most northerly population grows in shallow sand over sandstone (WA Herbarium 2006).

The flowering period for this species is July to August (WA Herbarium 2006). Little is known about the levels of flower and fruit production of this species. However, its floral structure suggests that it is insect pollinated.

There are no data on seed viability.

While fire and changed fire regimes are considered a potential threat to Small-petalled Beyeria, it is considered likely that occasional fires are needed for recruitment, as this species regenerates after fire (Patrick 2001). Brown and colleagues (1998) consider it is probably a relatively short-lived disturbance opportunist, appearing after a fire and then declining in number over the next few years. Beyeria species as a group are characteristically fire/disturbance responsive and decline in the absence of suitable disturbance. As fire regimes in particular have changed since European settlement of the area, the occurrence of this species has been affected due to the change in fire frequency and intensity.

Track and firebreak maintenance

As Small-petalled Beyeria occurs on tracks and firebreaks, it is potentially susceptible to accidental damage from maintenance activities such as grading and widening. Track and firebreak maintenance is ongoing within the National Park and conservation reserves where Small-petalled Beyeria occurs. This maintenance will impact on the species, however the level of impact is being managed through a Western Australian government process, with approval and a permit required to "take" (damage or destroy) Declared Rare Flora.

Inappropriate fire regimes

Inappropriate fire regimes may potentially threaten the species, as seeds of Small-petalled Beyeria probably germinate following fire. Under an inappropriate fire regime, the soil seed bank is likely to be depleted by recurrent fires before regenerating plants have reached maturity and have replenished the soil seed bank (CALM 2006b). However, occasional fires are almost certainly needed for recruitment of this species (Brown et al. 1998; Patrick 2001).

A Conservation Advice (TSSC 2008adx) for the Small-petalled Beyeria identifies research priorities and actions to assist in threat abatement. These are:

  • Monitor known populations.
  • Identify appropriate fire or other disturbance regimes for Small-petalled Beyeria.
  • Monitor the progress of recovery, including the effectiveness of management actions and the need to adapt them if necessary.
  • Ensure road and firebreak maintenance activities in areas where Small-petalled Beyeria occurs do not adversely impact on known populations. Develop and implement a suitable fire management strategy for Small-petalled Beyeria.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Beyeria lepidopetala (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008adx) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Sus scrofa (Pig) Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Habitat degradation caused by firebreak construction and/or maintenance Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Beyeria lepidopetala (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008adx) [Conservation Advice].
Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Beyeria lepidopetala (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008adx) [Conservation Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Poor recruitment (regeneration) and declining population numbers Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009d) [Recovery Plan].

Brown, A., C. Thomson-Dans & N. Marchant, eds. (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Como, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

CALM (2006b). Unpublished draft. Short petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Interim Recovery Plan 2006-2011. Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Hopper, S.D., S. van Leeuwen, A.P. Brown & S.J. Patrick (1990). Western Australia's Endangered Flora and other plants under consideration for declaration. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Consrvation and Land Management.

Leigh, J., R. Boden & J. Briggs (1984). Extinct and Endangered Plants of Australia. Melbourne, Victoria: Macmillan.

Meredith, L.D. & M.M. Richardson (1990). Rare or Threatened Australian Plant Species in Cultivation in Australia. Report Series No. 15. Page(s) 1-114. Canberra: Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Mueller, F. (1859). Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae.:230.

O'Donaghue, M. & J. Riley (1992). Wanted Dead or Alive - Presumed Extinct Western Australian Plants. Page(s) 4. Perth, CALM.

Patrick, S.J. (2001). Declared Rare or Poorly Known Flora in the Geraldton District. [Online]. Wildlife Management Program No 26. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/plants-and-animals/threatened-species-and-communities/threatened-plants.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008adx). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Beyeria lepidopetala. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/18362-conservation-advice.pdf.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2008aec). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Beyeria lepidopetala. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/18362-listing-advice.pdf.

Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC) (2009d). Short-petalled Beyeria (Beyeria lepidopetala) Recovery Plan. [Online]. Canberra, ACT: DEWHA. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/short-petalled-beyeria.html.

Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management (WA CALM) (2006b). Records held in CALM's Declared Flora Database and rare flora files. Perth, Western Australia: Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Western Australian Herbarium (2006). Florabase - The Western Australian Flora. [Online]. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/.

EPBC Act email updates can be received via the Communities for Communities newsletter and the EPBC Act newsletter.

This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Beyeria lepidopetala in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 1 Aug 2014 09:56:33 +1000.