Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aeb) [Listing Advice].
 
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afn) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, the species occurs entirely within managed national parks. Therefore the approved Conservation Advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and manage the threats of Phytophthora cinnamomi and wildfire (19/12/2008).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Other EPBC Act Plans Fitzgerald Biosphere Recovery Plan: A Landscape Approach to Threatened Species and Ecological Communities Recovery and Biodiversity Conservation (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2012) [Recovery Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (69) (19/12/2008) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008d) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list)
Scientific name Daviesia obovata [17311]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Turcz.
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/browse/profile/3825

The current conservation status of the Paddle-leaf Daviesia, Daviesia obovata, under Australian and State Government legislation, is as follows:

National: Listed as Endangered under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Western Australia: Listed as Declared Rare Flora under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950.

Scientific name: Daviesia obovata

Common name: Paddle-leaf Daviesia

Paddle-leaf Daviesia is an erect, slender shrub that grows 0.7–1.5 m high. Flowers are yellow and black and the flowering period is from September to October. This species has paddle-shaped leaves and woody fruits. This species is very distinctive, even when not flowering (WA CALM 2006).

Paddle-leaf Daviesia is endemic to Western Australia and is known from 11 subpopulations in Stirling Range National Park and Fitzgerald River National Park, approximately 100 km north and 200 km north-east of Albany, respectively. The distance between these two areas is approximately 130 km. The land between these areas has been cleared extensively, however, scattered remnants of vegetation occur across the landscape. These national parks occur within the South Coast Natural Resource Management Region (TSSC 2008aeb).

The Paddle-leaf Daviesia's extent of occurrence is approximately 500 km². The area was calculated by creating a polygon around known subpopulations. Data was taken from the Western Australia's Department of Conservation and Land Management (WA CALM, currently known as the Department of Environment and Conservation) Threatened Flora Database (which contains a single GPS coordinate for each population). The future trends for extent of occurrence of the species are uncertain, however, the majority of populations are infected by dieback (Phytophthora cinnamomi) or are in areas where the disease occurs. It is therefore likely that there will be a decline in the species extent of occurrence in the future, however, the extent of this decline is uncertain. There is no data to indicate past decline in extent of occurrence of this species (WA CALM 2006).

There is insufficient data to calculate this species area of occupancy as not all subpopulations have the area recorded. For subpopulations where the area of occupancy is recorded, most occurred over a few hectares, with one subpopulation occupying 20 ha. Based on extrapolations of this information, the area of occupancy for the 11 subpopulations is estimated to be approximately 0.3 km². There is little data available to show a past decline in area of occupancy of this species. However, it is likely that the area of occupancy of the species will decline given that the majority of subpopulations are infected by Phytophthora cinnamomi (WA CALM 2006).

There are no translocated populations for the Paddle-leaf Daviesia. Seed material has been collected and stored at WA CALM's Threatened Flora Seed Centre (WA CALM 2006).

The subpopulations occur within two national parks in the south coast region of Western Australia. The land between these national parks has been largely cleared for agriculture. Therefore the species distribution is considered to be fragmented as known subpopulations are scattered with some distances between them (WA CALM 2006).

This species was first collected from a number of locations in Stirling Range National Park in 1982. Extensive surveys in the Stirling Range National Park were undertaken from autumn 1999 to spring 2000 and discovered several new subpopulations.

In 1995, surveys of suitable habitat at Fitzgerald River National Park located a new subpopulation. Another subpopulation was found in this national park in 2002.

Most of the potential habitat for the Paddle-leaf Daviesia has been surveyed. However, the mountainous topography of the Stirling Range National Park has restricted some surveying. These non-surveyed areas occur within the known range of this species, thus, the discovery of new locations in these areas would not increase area of occurrence (WA CALM 2006).

The total population size for this species is estimated to be approximately 1952 plants. This figure is based on actual number of plants counted during subpopulation monitoring. The following table presents survey dates and population size for known subpopulations (WA CALM 2006):

Subpopulation number Survey date Population information
1a 09/06/1982
08/12/2000
06/11/2003
14/12/2004
Not recorded
400
500
700
1b 06/11/2003 200
1c 06/11/2003 1
1d 14/12/2004 7
2 07/05/1982 10
3 07/10/1982 Not recorded
4a 21/09/1995
13/10/1996
07/11/1997
19/04/2000
28/02/2001
01/02/2002
15/04/2003
Not recorded
300
300
50
9
5
22
4b 15/04/2003 0
5a 13/10/1995
27/11/2002
20
500
5b 27/11/2002 Included with 5a
5c 27/11/2002 Included with 5a
6a 13/10/1996
15/03/2000
05/02/2002
Not recorded
0
0
6b 15/03/2000
05/02/2002
1
0
7 09/09/1987
21/11/2000
10/01/2002
03/04/2003
Not recorded
0
0
160
8a 11/02/2002
01/12/2004
1
50
8b 11/02/2002
28/02/2002
01/02/2004
1
10
100
8c 25/05/1999
11/02/2002
24/03/2003
01/12/2004
30
1
0
100
8d 28/11/2003
01/12/2004
20
100
8e 01/12/2004 1
9 17/10/2000 1
10 01/11/2001
28/11/2002
3
Not recorded
11 25/04/2003 0

Some Paddle-leaf Daviesia subpopulations have experienced a substantial increase in subpopulation size, mainly due to survey efforts locating more plants. WA CALM observed this species in decline at Ellen Peak (subpopulation 4a and 4b) and Moongoongoonderup (subpopulation 2, 6a and 6b) during 1999 and 2000 surveys (WA CALM 2006).

Paddle-leaf Daviesia subpopulations at Ellen Peak (subpopulation 4a and 4b), Moongoongoonderup (subpopulation 2, 6a and 6b), Mount Success (subpopulation 8a, 8b, 8c, 8d and 8e) and Kyanorup (subpopulation 9) were burnt during a October 2000 fire. Some of these subpopulations have appeared to recover since the fire with resprouting and seedlings (WA CALM 2006).

Trends for the whole species are difficult to determine based on survey information. Some subpopulations are experiencing a decline due to dieback; other population are increasing in size due to recovery after fire or more comprehensive surveys yielding more specimens (WA CALM 2006).

All known subpopulations occur within conservation estate (Stirling Range National Park and Fitzgerald River National Park), which are managed by WA CALM (WA CALM 2006).

The Paddle-leaf Daviesia grows in stony loam, sandy loam and occurs on hill slopes and outcrops. Associated species include Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) and Spearwood Mallee (E. doratoxylon) over heath of Beaufortia anisandra and Isopogon spp. (WA CALM 2006).

Details on Paddle-leaf Daviesia generation length, life expectancy and natural mortality are unknown. This species has been observed to resprout after fire but can also recruit from seed. The flowering period for this species is from September to October. A pollination study has not been conducted but, based on floral architecture, is likely to be insect pollinated (WA CALM 2006). This species is likely to mature at an early age (TSSC 2008aeb).

Surveys should be conducted in areas of similar soil types and vegetation during the flowering season (September to October) (WA CALM 2006).

All Paddle-leaf Daviesia subpopulations are affected by similar threats. Past threats include land clearing, present threats include dieback from Phytophthora cinnamomi and inappropriate fire regimes, and future threats include climate change, dieback from Phytophthora cinnamomi and inappropriate fire regimes (WA CALM 2006).

The two areas that this species occurs in are national parks, and the area between these locations has been cleared for agriculture. It is likely that previous populations occurred in areas that have been cleared (WA CALM 2006). As remaining subpopulations occur in national parks, land clearing is not considered a present or future threat (TSSC 2008aeb).

This species is susceptible to dieback caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi. The impact of dieback on this taxon is difficult to determine as subpopulations tend to be small and fragmented. It has also been confirmed that the poor state of the majority of the known subpopulations has been exacerbated by dieback and it has been reported that several of the known subpopulations (4, 6b, 8 and 11) are in decline due to this disease (WA CALM 2006). Long-term impacts of dieback may be masked by germination events following mortality (TSSC 2008aeb).

In October 2000 several subpopulations were affected by wildfire with mortality occurring followed by regermination. The species has a long-lived soil seed bank that can germinate in response to fire or soil disturbance. Too frequent fire will deplete the soil seed bank and lead to localised extinction (WA CALM 2006).

Climate change and the associated processes such as sea level rise are expected to affect biodiversity in Western Australia during the next few decades (WA CALM 2006). It is of particular threat to rare species that are often already occurring in small fragmented subpopulations that have evolved specifically to their habitat. Should particular parameters of their habitat change the species may not be able to cope and hence lead to extinction. However it is unknown how climate change will specifically affect this species.

Minister's reasons for recovery plan decision

The Paddle-leaf Daviesia occurs entirely within managed national parks. Therefore the approved Conservation Advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and manage the threats of Phytophthora cinnamomi and wildfire. A recovery plan is not considered to be necessary at this time.

Recovery actions

A number of priority actions have been identified in the Conservation Advice for Daviesia obovata (TSSC 2008afn) and WA CALM (2006) and include:

  • Undertake seed germination and/or vegetative propagation trials to determine the requirements for successful establishment.
  • Develop and implement a suitable fire management strategy.
  • Monitor known populations to identify key threats and subpopulation health.
  • Undertake survey work in suitable habitat and potential habitat to locate any additional subpopulations.
  • Develop and implement suitable hygiene protocols to protect known sites from further outbreaks of dieback caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi.
  • Develop and implement suitable hygiene protocols to protect known sites that are free from Phytophthora cinnamomi from outbreaks of the disease.
  • Investigate ex situ propagation programs.

A number of management plans would assist in the management of Paddle-leaf Daviesia. These include the Conservation Advice for Daviesia obovata (TSSC 2008afn), the Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root-rot Fungus Phytophthora cinnamomi (EA 2001l), the Stirling Range and Porongurup National Parks Management Plan 1999-2009 (Herford 1999) and the Fitzgerald River National Park Management Plan 1991-2001 (Moore et al. 1992).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Commonwealth Listing Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aeb) [Listing Advice].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Commonwealth Listing Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aeb) [Listing Advice].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aeb) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi Commonwealth Listing Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aeb) [Listing Advice].
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afn) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Daviesia obovata (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afn) [Conservation Advice].

Environment Australia (EA) (2001m). Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root-rot Fungus Phytophthora cinnamomi. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/phytophthora.html.

Herford, I.K. (1999). Management plan: Stirling Range National Park and Porongurup National Park 1999-2009. Perth: Department of Conservation and Land Management for the National Parks and Nature Conservation Authority.

Moore, S., M. Cavana, K. Gillen, C. Hart, S. Hopper, K. Orr & W. Schmidt (1992). Fitzgerald River National Park Management Plan 1991-2001. Perth: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2008aeb). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Daviesia obovata. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/17311-listing-advice.pdf.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2008afn). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Daviesia obovata. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/17311-conservation-advice.pdf.

Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management (WA CALM) (2006). Records held in CALM's Declared Flora Database and rare flora files. Perth, Western Australia: WA CALM.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Daviesia obovata in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 1 Aug 2014 00:33:56 +1000.