Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered as Phalaenopsis rosenstromii
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Phalaenopsis rosenstromii (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008sm) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Policy Statements and Guidelines Draft survey guidelines for Australia's threatened orchids (Department of the Environment, 2013b) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Phalaenopsis rosenstromii.
 
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Endangered (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list) as Phalaenopsis amabilis var. rosenstromii
Scientific name Phalaenopsis amabilis subsp. rosenstromii [87535]
Family Orchidaceae:Orchidales:Liliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author  
Infraspecies author (F.M.Bailey) Christenson
Reference Christenson, E.A., (2001) Phalaenopsis: a monograph: 190 [comb. nov.]
Other names Phalaenopsis rosenstromii [15984]
Phalaenopsis amabilis var. rosenstromii [32132]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.anbg.gov.au/stamps/stamp.phalaenopsis-ros.html

Scientific Name: Phalaenopsis rosenstromii

Common Name: Native Moth Orchid

Conventionally accepted as P. rosenstromii (CHAH 2005). The species has been known as P. amabilis subsp. rosenstromii and P. amabilis var. papuana (Dockrill 1992; Jones 1988; Lavarack & Gray 1985).

The Native Moth Orchid is a mostly epiphytic (growing on trees) plant with long, thick, flat roots and stems that grow to 10–30 cm in length. Each stem has 2–8 broad, fleshy, dark green and unequally notched leaves that are crowded and hang semi-pendulously (loosely). The inflorescence (flower cluster) grows up to 75 cm in length and is arching, stiff and sparsely branched. Each branch bears 2–10 flowers. Flowers are large, growing to 6–7 cm in height and 5–8 cm in width, white and are moth-like in shape. The labellum (lip or median petal) of the flowers is about 2.5 cm long, white with yellow and red-brown streaks and bars and has two curved thread-like appendages (Jones 1988, 2006).

The Native Moth Orchid occurs in north-east Queensland, being found sporadically from the Iron Range in the north and as far south as the Paluma Ranges (Jones 2006; Queensland Herbarium 2008c). This species occurs within the Cape York Peninsula Wet Tropics and Burdekin (Queensland) Natural Resource Management Region.

The Native Moth Orchid is recorded in Daintree National Park (NP), Iron Range NP and Mount Spec NP (Briggs & Leigh 1996).

The Native Moth Orchid is found in humid rainforest areas, close to waterfalls or streams, in deep gorges, sheltered slopes or gullies in notophyll vine thickets, deciduous vine thickets and in open forest. The Native Moth Orchid grows in shaded or partially shaded positions (Jones 1988; Lavarack 1977b, 1980, 1984b), on trees and less commonly on rocks. The species is found at altitudes from 200–500 m above sea level (though is less common below 500 m) (Dockrill 1992; Jones 2006).

The distribution of the Native Moth Orchid overlaps with the Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b), which is listed under the EPBC Act as a Critically Endangered Ecological Community.

Flowering in the Native Moth Orchid is recorded from December–April (Jones 1988).

Collection of plants from the wild by orchid enthusiasts is considered the major threat to the Native Moth Orchid (Leigh & Briggs 1992).

Management Plan

The species is managed under the Management Program for Protected Plants in Queensland 2011-2015, developed by the Queensland Department of Environment and Resource Management (Qld DERM 2011b).

Commonwealth Conservation Advice

Refer to the Commonwealth Conservation Advice (TSSC 2008sm) for information on research priorities and recovery priority actions to mitigate threats including habitat loss, disturbance and modification, weeds and fire. Raising awareness of the species and enabling recovery of additional populations are also encouraged in the Advice.

Management documents for the Native Moth Orchid can be found at the start of this profile. Other management documents relevant to the species include:

  • Management Program for Protected Plants in Queensland 2011-2015 (Qld DERM 2011b).
  • Wet Tropics Conservation Strategy: the conservation, rehabilitation and transmission to future generations of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area (WTMA 2004).
  • Interim management intent for day to day operations Iron Range National Park and resource reserves (Delaney & Blackman 1996).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Biological Resource Use:Gathering Terrestrial Plants:Illegal collection Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Phalaenopsis rosenstromii (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008sm) [Conservation Advice].
Uncategorised:Uncategorised:threats not specified Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Phalaenopsis rosenstromii (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008sm) [Conservation Advice].

Briggs, J.D. & J.H. Leigh (1996). Rare or Threatened Australian Plants - Revised Edition. Collingwood: CSIRO Publishing.

Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) (2005). Australian Plant Census. [Online]. Australian National Herbarium, Australian National Botanic Gardens and Australian Biological Resources Study . Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/chah/apc/.

Delaney, M.J. & M. Blackman (1996). Interim management intent for day to day operations Iron Range National Park & resource reserves. Brisbane, Department of Environment.

Dockrill, A.W. (1992). Australian indigenous orchids, revised edition. Sydney, SGAP, NSW Region.

Jones, D.L. (1988). Native Orchids of Australia. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Reed.

Jones, D.L. (2006). A complete guide to Native Orchids of Australia, including the island Territories. Sydney, NSW: New Holland Publishers (Australia) Pty Ltd.

Lavarack, P.S. (1977b). Project to study orchids of Cape York, Queensland. Qld Parks & Wildlife Service, Queensland.

Lavarack, P.S. (1980). Cape York orchid project. Orchids of McIlwraith Range. Qld Parks & Wildlife Service, Queensland.

Lavarack, P.S. (1984b). Orchids of the Carron Valley area. Qld Parks & Wildlife Service, Queensland.

Lavarack, P.S. & Gray, B. (1985). Tropical Orchids of Australia. Melbourne, Nelson.

Leigh, J.H. & J.D. Briggs (Eds) (1992). Threatened Australian Plants. Overview and Case Studies. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service.

Queensland Department of Environment and Resource Management (Qld DERM) (2011b). Management Program for Protected Plants in Queensland 2011-2015. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/wildlife-trade/sources/management-plans/qld-flora.html.

Queensland Herbarium (2008c). Specimen label information.

Wet Tropics Management Authority (WTMA) (2004a). Wet Tropics Conservation Strategy: the conservation, rehabilitation and transmission to future generations of the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Cairns, Wet Tropics Management Authority (WTMA).

EPBC Act email updates can be received via the Communities for Communities newsletter and the EPBC Act newsletter.

This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Phalaenopsis amabilis subsp. rosenstromii in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sat, 30 Aug 2014 22:49:31 +1000.