Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Ctenotus lancelini (Lancelin Island Skink) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008do) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat abatement plan to reduce the impacts of exotic rodents on biodiversity on Australian offshore islands of less than 100 000 hectares 2009 (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2009u) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened reptiles. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.6 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011m) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Lancelin Island Skink Recovery Plan. Wildlife Management Program No 22 (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2000) [State Recovery Plan].
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Vulnerable (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Vulnerable (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
Scientific name Ctenotus lancelini [1482]
Family Scincidae:Squamata:Reptilia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author Ford,1969
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

A reptile similar to Ctenotus labillardieri but is larger (growing to 8 cm) with paler brown back colour, speckled back, and yellow legs spotted and streaked with blackish-brown (Cogger 2000).

Until recently, thought only to occur on Lancelin I., a 7.6 ha Nature Reserve 700 m off the WA coast near the town of Lancelin, approximately 100 km north of Perth (Cogger et al. 1993; Pearson & Jones 2000). In 1993-5, searches of several nearby mainland areas found a single specimen in a Lancelin foreshore reserve directly opposite the island (Maryan & Browne-Cooper 1994). Subsequent searches and trapping at this site have failed to locate any further specimens (Pearson & Jones 2000).

The Lancelin I. population was estimated to consist of 3000 adults in 1994-5. Population density varied over the island, with the most densely populated habitats containing 800 skinks per hectare. The species is very rare at the only known mainland location (Pearson & Jones 2000).

C. lancelini is closely related to the highly variable Ctenotus labillardieri of south-western WA (Cogger 2000; Pearson & Jones 2000). Genetic work has revealed they are distinct species, but found two specimens of C. labillardieri from Meelup and near Pinjarra to be very similar to C. lancelini. Further morphological and DNA work is required to determine if these specimens represent further mainland populations of C. lancelini or a sister taxon (Pearson & Jones 2000).

Occurs in all major vegetated habitat types on the island. Preferred substrates were sand and shallow soil over limestone. The vegetation consists of low shrubs with winter annuals, predominantly Rye Grass (Lolium rigidum) and Wild Oats (Avena barbata). Skinks were most dense in areas with nearby slopes facing north to northeast as these are protected from strong winds and receive early morning sunlight. The area with the highest density was the dune and swale behind the eastern beach (Pearson & Jones 2000).

The vegetation at the single mainland site is structurally and floristically similar to the vegetation on the eastern side of Lancelin I. (Pearson & Jones 2000).

In rocky outcrops where the species was first discovered, specimens were found sheltering under exfoliating limestone slabs, sometimes using loose sand under the slabs for cover when disturbed (Ford 1963; Wilson & Knowles 1988; Browne-Cooper & Maryan 1992, Pearson & Jones 2000). In other areas of the island, individuals were observed to use seabird nesting burrows for shelter when disturbed (Pearson & Jones 2000).

Foraging occurs within leaf litter, with the diet consisting almost entirely of insects and litter accumulations (Jones 1996).

Males are less abundant than females, making up only 30% of total captures. Males are particularly rare in areas with the highest densities of females (Jones 1996).

Some females begin breeding in their second year, while others delay until their third year. The reproductive life span of females appears to exceed six years (Jones 1996).

Gravid females were captured throughout the island, but were the most common on well protected NE slopes, suggesting these represent the best egg incubation sites. Hatchlings were captured in other areas, suggesting alternate sites are still successful (Jones 1996).

Six gravid females were captured and brought into captivity, and they laid eggs between 12 Dec. and 20 Jan. Clutch size varied between two and five, with the most common clutch size being three. Eggs hatched after 40-46 days when incubated at 29°C (Pearson & Jones 1996).

Hatchlings appear in the population in mid-Jan. In years of low rainfall between Dec. and Apr., there appears to be no recruitment into the population, suggesting juveniles are dependent on rain to survive to sub-adulthood (Jones 1996).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Ctenotus lancelini (Lancelin Island Skink) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008do) [Conservation Advice].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat modification with associated erosion Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fw) [Internet].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fw) [Internet].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Recreational Activities:Disturbance, especially from human recreational activities and development Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fw) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Ctenotus lancelini (Lancelin Island Skink) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008do) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition and/or predation by birds Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fw) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fw) [Internet].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fw) [Internet].
Uncategorised:Uncategorised:threats not specified Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fw) [Internet].

Browne-Cooper, R. & B. Maryan (1992). Notes on the status of the skink lizard Ctenotus lancelini, on Lancelin Island. Western Australian Naturalist. 19 (1):63-65.

Cogger, H.G. (2000). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia - 6th edition. Sydney, NSW: Reed New Holland.

Cogger, H.G., E.E. Cameron, R.A. Sadlier & P. Eggler (1993). The Action Plan for Australian Reptiles. [Online]. Canberra, ACT: Australian Nature Conservation Agency. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/action/reptiles/index.html.

Ford, J. (1963). The reptilian fauna of the islands between Dongara and Lancelin, Western Australia. Western Australian Naturalist. 8 (6):135-142.

Jones, B. (1996). A field study of the Lancelin Island Skink Ctenotus lancelini. CALM.

Maryan, B. & R. Browne-Cooper (1994). Discovery of the Lancelin Island Skink (Ctenotus lancelini) on the mainland. Western Australian Naturalist. 20:13-14.

Pearson, D. & B. Jones (2000). Lancelin Island Skink Recovery Plan. Page(s) 1-14. CALM. CALM, Perth.

Wilson, S.K. & D.G. Knowles (1988). Australia's Reptiles: A Photographic Reference to the Terrestrial Reptiles of Australia. Australia: Collins Publishers.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Ctenotus lancelini in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:49:11 +1000.