Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Minuria tridens
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012ar) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan] as Minuria tridens.
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Minuria tridens.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NT:Threatened Species of the Northern Territory - Minuria tridens (Nano, C., R. Kerrigan & D. Albrecht, 2012) [Information Sheet].
State Listing Status
NT: Listed as Vulnerable (Territory Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 2000 (Northern Territory): 2012) as Minuria tridens
Non-statutory Listing Status
WA: Listed as P1 (Priority Flora and Priority Fauna List (Western Australia): April 2014)
Scientific name Minuria tridens [13753]
Family Asteraceae:Asterales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author (D.Cooke) Lander
Infraspecies author  
Reference Nuytsia 6 (23 Dec. 1987) 64.
Other names Olearia tridens [22168]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Minuria tridens

Common name: Minnie Daisy

The Minnie Daisy is a perennial daisy that grows between 25–50 cm high. It produces flower heads with mauve or white ray florets and yellow disk florets (Albrecht & Pitts 2004; Cooke 1986).

The Minnie Daisy occurs in the Northern Territory (NT) and Western Australia (WA).

In the NT it has been recorded in the West MacDonnell National Park (NP) (two populations) (Albrecht & Pitts 2004; Cooke 1986), Watarrka NP (George Gill Range), Trephina Nature Park (Cooke 1986; Lander 1987), Ilparpa Swamp Wildlife Protected Area (Alice Springs News 1998), Finke Gorge NP (Palm Valley), Henbury Pastoral Lease, Loves Creek, Owen Springs, Todd River Stations, Ntaria, Santa Teresa, Roulpamaulpma, Haasts Bluff, Uruna and six sites in Alice Springs municipality (Firth 2009). In the NT, the species' area of occupancy is < 2000 km² (Nano et al. 2012) and extent of occurrence is 20 000 km² (Nano & Pavey 2008).

In WA, a single record has been made 22 km south of Cue on the Great Northern Highway (Cooke 1986; Lander 1987). A 2008 search failed to relocate the population (TSSC 2012ar).

The Minnie Daisy consists of 20 populations (Firth 2009) with a total population size of less than 3000 plants with approximately 300 individuals in the largest population (Threatened Species Network 1999b). Populations in the MacDonnell Ranges typically consist of 1–30 plants (Threatened Species Network 1999b). The WA population was described as common in 1986 but could not be relocated in 2008 (Firth 2009).

Approximately 1000 Minuria tridens individuals are known to occur within conservation reserves (Albrecht et al. 1997). These reserves include: Finke Gorge NP, Trephina Gorge NP and West MacDonnell NP (Moon & Low 2005).

The Minnie Daisy typically occurs on south facing slopes or steep rocky cliffs in low shrubland on dolomite, limestone and calcrete-impregnated sandstone hills and ranges (Cooke 1986; Nano & Pavey 2008).

Associated shrubland is mixed with Rock Fuchsia Bush (Eremophila freelingii), Witchetty Bush (Acacia kempeana), Silver Cassia (Senna artemisioides) and White Indigo (Indigofera leucotricha) (Nano et al. 2012; Nano & Pavey 2008) with spinifex (Triodia spp.) largely absent and Buffel Grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) in more disturbed areas (Nano et al. 2012).

During dry periods, the Minnie Daisy appears dead. Rain causes re-sprouting from dormant stem buds (Albrecht & Pitts 2004) and is required for flowering (Cooke 1986). Flowering has been observed in February, March, May–October and December. Fruit has been recorded in February, March, May, July, September and December (Moon & Low 2005). Less than 5% of florets may produce fertile fruit, possibly due to a lack of pollinators (Threatened Species Network 1999b). Plants live for at least 10 years (Firth 2009).

The Minnie Daisy has distinctive leaves (Cooke 1986), but surveys should be carried out during the flowering period. A targeted vegetation survey in 2005, used the following methodology (Moon & Low 1995):

  • determine the distribution of potential suitable habitat
  • obtain images of specimens from the herbarium to facilitate identification of the species in the field;
  • conduct a foot survey of potential suitable habitat to determine if the species is present.

The main threats to the Minnie Daisy are frequent fire, poor natural recruitment and invasion by Buffel Grass (Cenchrus ciliaris). The species is also palatable to the Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus); however the impact of this on the viability of populations is currently unknown (Threatened Species Network 1999b).

Fire

Frequent fire leads to a predominence of spinifex (Triodia spp.) in plant communities; often resulting in the exclusion of more fire-sensitive species (Threatened Species Network 1999b). Areas devoid of spinifex are thought to reflect infrequent burning regimes and some threatened plants are now restricted to these less-frequently burned sites. The largest population of the Minnie Daisy occurs where there is an absence or low density of spinifex. Buffel Grass increases fire frequency (Nano & Pavey 2006).

In WA, the Minnie Daisy is recognised as a Priority 1 flora species. This status indicates that the species is poorly known and requires further surveys.

The recovery plan for the Minnie Daisy (Nano & Pavey 2008) lists a number of specific objectives for the species.

Management documents for the Minnie Daisy are at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat alteration (vegetation, soil, hydrology) due to trampling and grazing by livestock National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate change altering atmosphere/hydrosphere temperatures, rainfall patterns and/or frequency of severe weather events National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Small isolated populations National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) Minuria tridens in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ql) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Cenchrus ciliaris (Buffel-grass, Black Buffel-grass) Minuria tridens in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ql) [Internet].
National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by insects National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by kangaroos and wallabies National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Minuria tridens in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ql) [Internet].
National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Declining genetic diversity National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low fecundity, reproductive rate and/or poor recruitment National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Poor recruitment (regeneration) and declining population numbers Minuria tridens in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ql) [Internet].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development of roads and railroads National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower) (Nano, C. & C. Pavey, 2008) [Recovery Plan].

Albrecht, D. & B. Pitts (2004). The vegetation and plant species of the Alice Springs municipality, Northern Territory. Greening Australia NT and the Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment, Alice Springs.

Albrecht, D.E., A.W. Duguid, P.K. Latz, H. Coulson & M.J. Barritt (1997). Vascular plant checklist for the southern bioregions of the Northern Territory: nomenclature, distribution and conservation status. Parks and Wildlife Commission of the Northern Territory, Alice Springs.

Alice Springs News (1998). Beautiful Ilparpa Valley Should be a Park, not a Rubbish Tip. Alice Springs News. [Online]. Alice Springs: Erwin Chlanda Pty Ltd. Available from: http://www.alicespringsnews.com.au/0506.html.

Cooke, D.A. (1986). Two new species of Olearia Moench (Compositae: Astereae) from Central Australia. Muelleria. 6(3,4):181-184.

Firth, L. (2009). Minuria tridens - Species Information Sheet. Provided to the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Department of Environment and Conservation.

Lander, N.S. (1987). New Combinations in Minuria DC. (Asteracrar: Astereae). Nuytsia. 6(1):63-66.

Moon, E. & B. Low (2005). Emily Valley Estate, Focused Vegetation Survey for the vulnerable Minnie Daisy, Minuria tridens. A report for QANTEC McWilliam consulting engineers, Low Ecological Services P/L, Alice Springs (NT).

Nano, C. & C. Pavey (2008). National Recovery Plan for Olearia macdonnellensis, Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy) and Actinotus schwarzii (Desert Flannel Flower). [Online]. Northern Territory: Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/daisies-flannel-flower.html.

Nano, C., R. Kerrigan & D. Albrecht (2012). Threatened Species of the Northern Territory - Minuria tridens. [Online]. Available from: http://lrm.nt.gov.au/plants-and-animals/threatened-species/specieslist.

Threatened Species Network (1999b). Lime Minuria Species Profile Sheet. [Online]. Available from: http://nccnsw.org.au/member/tsn/context/profiles/203.html.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2012ar). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Minuria tridens (Minnie Daisy). [Online]. Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Canberra, ACT: Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/13753-listing-advice.pdf.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Minuria tridens in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Mon, 21 Apr 2014 15:09:10 +1000.