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Publications archive - Biodiversity

Disclaimer

Key departmental publications, e.g. annual reports, budget papers and program guidelines are available in our online archive.

Much of the material listed on these archived web pages has been superseded, or served a particular purpose at a particular time. It may contain references to activities or policies that have no current application. Many archived documents may link to web pages that have moved or no longer exist, or may refer to other documents that are no longer available.

Wildlife conservation and traditional medicines booklet

Tiger Medicine

Contents

What is the issue?

Many of the world's animals and plants are threatened because of human activity, such as loss of habitat, hunting, poaching and the uncontrolled trade in wildlife and wildlife parts. One factor driving this trade is the demand for animal and plant derivatives for use in traditional medicines. Some of these species, including the tiger and rhinoceros, are now in great danger of extinction.

If endangered species continue to be used in traditional medicine, the supply will simply run out. Ending the illegal trade in protected wildlife and wildlife parts, though not the only answer, will help prevent their further decline. While demand for properties contained in traditional medicine will continue, these can often be met from medically acceptable alternatives to protected animals and plants.

We must work together to address this threat now. This booklet is to inform users, practitioners and importers of traditional medicines containing wildlife about Australia's wildlife trade laws and alternatives to using endangered species.